For 1,481 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

J.R. Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 A Separation
Lowest review score: 0 The Back-up Plan
Score distribution:
1481 movie reviews
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Costner has the stoic routine down pat, and there are some spectacular action sequences of helicopter rescues on the high seas, but Kutcher is in way over his head.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The bar for historical accuracy in Hollywood biopics hasn't always been this high -- paradoxically, it's been rising even as the public has become more ignorant of history.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Visually and dramatically it works well - it's Shakespeare by way of "Black Hawk Down" - but as an allegory of modern-day geopolitics it doesn't really go anywhere.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Emotionally charged but not entirely honest documentary.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    What might have been a serious drama about coming to terms with violence and loss turns into a crowd-pleasing and increasingly far-fetched remake of "Death Wish."
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Brothers Brad and John Hennegan track six thoroughbreds in the qualifying races running up to the 2006 Kentucky Derby, yet the horseflesh isn't as interesting to them as the owners and trainers, an odd assortment of moneymen and equine gurus with a culture all their own.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Jeb Stuart directed, his well-rounded portrait of the community partly undermined by the slack editing; with Rick Schroder as the minister and Michael Rooker as the defense attorney.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    More or less restages Tobe Hooper's 1974 original, including its much-loved family dinner scene.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    George Clooney produced and stars in this international spy thriller, which he probably thought of as existential but which registers onscreen as a giant bore.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Luhrmann's squirrelly, five-exclamation-point stylings mercifully subside after the first 20 minutes or so, leaving behind a palatable big-screen confection.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Based on a story by Steve Martin of all people, the script seldom rises above formula (Guy Pearce and Neal McDonough are especially ill served as a pair of starchy FBI agents), but its respectful treatment of Islam is both unusual and welcome.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    It's the angriest comedy I've encountered all year, though it's pretty well spoiled by Carrey, who insists on turning it into a star vehicle with his slapstick and spazz attacks.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    By the time director Patrice Leconte arrives at his predictable climax and conventional moral, this lethargic French comedy may not have any friends either.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The main pleasure of this high-stakes-poker drama is watching a septuagenarian Burt Reynolds effortlessly revive his 70s screen persona as a strutting paragon of male shrewdness and sexuality.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Director Nigel Cole is best known for "Calendar Girls" (2003), another condescending exercise in you-go-girl uplift.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Watching Best Worst Movie, you can't help but notice that the Troll 2 crowd consists almost exclusively of people in their 20s, which makes perfect sense: manufacturing an obsession with a terrible movie probably seems more worthwhile if you think you've got all the time in the world.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    As the WWF-style villain, Stiller misfires again and again, but Vaughn is reliably funny and Rip Torn has a great part as the underdogs' crotchety old coach.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Notorious on the festival circuit for its excruciating scenes of self-mutilation.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    After 9/11 and Katrina, this megabudget remake by Wolfgang Petersen benefits from a similar cultural oomph, though it's just as enjoyably silly as the original.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    This sitcom setup is as bad as it sounds, and Cox never really surmounts it, though the characters deepen significantly after the missionary is caught caressing the waiter and sent home to be excommunicated and shamed by his family.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Despite a three-hour running time Stone is too occupied with psychodrama to explore Alexander's innovations in battle, and Farrell, clearly out of his depth, seems less a leader of men than a Hellenistic James Dean.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Like her previous feature, "Look at Me" (2004), this relationship drama is mature and intelligent, but the character conflicts are so decorously handled that after a while the whole enterprise begins to seem more like a good waiter than a good story.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    This new version is an almost scene-for-scene remake, which is good news in the first half and bad news in the torpid second.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Unfortunately Jia --a rather limited actor, judging from the movies excerpted here -- has trouble either articulating or projecting the existential crisis that ultimately landed him in a mental institution, which leaves the emotional center of the film inert.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Warmly and gently handled, though the central story, detailing the personal politics between him and the six childlike monsters, steadily loses steam.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Accommodates some great water photography.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Scenes of harvested frogs provide an apt metaphor for Brazil's miserable have-nots, so apt that Kohn can't resist beating it to death.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Naturally, age and infirmity are a major subtext of Shine a Light (and, really, any movie featuring Keith Richards). No matter how cadaverous the Stones appear, they keep climbing onstage, and I’ll miss them when they’re finally gone.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The big green babysitter is back, but the charm has evaporated.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    An overloaded script by Heidi Thomas... defeats a fine cast

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