For 1,480 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

J.R. Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Precious: Based on the Novel 'Push' by Sapphire
Lowest review score: 0 Play the Game
Score distribution:
1480 movie reviews
    • 90 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The fun hardens into Fun after he's (Mr. Incredible) lured out of retirement and imprisoned in a remote island compound, though the sleek computer animation is spellbinding as usual.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Long, heavy, and not particularly edifying Holocaust drama.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The key scene -- is typical of the film's fanciful narrative approach but also its grating pretentiousness.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Like the earlier film, this one has an airless quality, much of the action taking place in the hushed and colorless offices of "the Circus." But whereas the dank tone of "Let the Right One In" served to heighten the moments of poignance and shrieking horror, Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy begins to seem phlegmatic after a while.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Alexander Payne has won an Oscar for best adapted screenplay (Sideways), but you'd never guess that from this clumsily written drama: characters keep explaining things that their listeners would already know, and the first couple reels are so thick with expository voice-over that you may think you're listening to a museum tour on a set of headphones.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    A relatively mindless thrill ride that would have made the old NBC execs grin from ear to ear.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    It often seems precious and overconceived, its accumulating crosses and double-crosses as devoid of consequence as a child's backyard game.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The project was produced in association with National Geographic World Films, a relationship borne out by the movie's cultural detail, rich earth-toned cinematography (by Falorni), and almost complete lack of dramatic tension.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Unfortunately, as in many such big-screen comic books, the backstory beats the hell out of the present-tense plot.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Like the incessant ringing of cowbells in the first two segments, the film may either hypnotize you or drive you stark staring mad.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Visually and dramatically it works well - it's Shakespeare by way of "Black Hawk Down" - but as an allegory of modern-day geopolitics it doesn't really go anywhere.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Claudel commits the cardinal sin of withholding the full story until the very end, when it spills out in a histrionic scene between the two sisters and largely exonerates the older one.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Bong's opening and climactic scenes, in which the old woman bops around to a dance tune amid a vast field of yellow grass, are typical of the movie's cockeyed poetry.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Though it easily surpasses most American action flicks, it suffers from the old commercial imperative of making the protagonist a nice guy, something Refn has seldom bothered with in Europe.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    You'd have to be a real curmudgeon not to enjoy a show with Ruth Brown, Mavis Staples, Solomon Burke...
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Whenever writer-director Oren Moverman moves past these scattered and admittedly voyeuristic moments into the lives of the two soldiers, the movie drifts into received wisdom and unconvincing romance.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Director Bob Clark teamed with nostalgic humorist Jean Shepherd for this squeaky clean and often quite funny 1983 yuletide comedy, adapted from Shepherd's novel In God We Trust: All Others Pay Cash.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Naturally, age and infirmity are a major subtext of Shine a Light (and, really, any movie featuring Keith Richards). No matter how cadaverous the Stones appear, they keep climbing onstage, and I’ll miss them when they’re finally gone.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Never really delivers on that promise, mainly because its scenes of two brilliant men discussing the nature of the subconscious can't compare with Cronenberg's visual rendering of that subconscious in earlier movies.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    After she's forced to confess, director Marc Rothemund doesn't have much to do but marvel at her heroic defiance, and the film is overtaken by its talkiness, claustrophobia, and polarized morality.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Stiller plays a monster, and when Gerwig goes for him, declaring that she sees his tender side, the development seems like a fond indulgence on the part of writer-director Noah Baumbach.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The cluttered narrative leaves little room for character development, though director Niels Arden Oplev does manage to accommodate plenty of gratuitous torture and rape.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The project reeks of commercial calculation, which is just tolerable until Walker, in search of a story arc, follows two chorus members with serious illnesses into the hospital.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 J.R. Jones
    This low-budget sci-fi item was produced by some of the Brits who made "Shaun of the Dead" and "Hot Fuzz," including their writer and director, Edgar Wright, but it hardly compares, despite Nick Frost's brief appearance as a mangy pot dealer.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    It never conjures up any coherent drama of its own, focusing instead on the historical destiny of Bernal's beefcake messiah.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Winterbottom and screenwriter Tony Grisoni were clearly motivated by conscience, but I can't help thinking that Stephen Frears's "Dirty Pretty Things," a much more conventional and contrived movie about third-world refugees, will have a greater social impact than this murky art-house item.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Emotionally charged but not entirely honest documentary.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The scenes between husband and wife are spectacularly awkward and arresting, though the movie grows more dubious the nearer the guys get to their shooting session in a local hotel room.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Inception delivers dazzling special effects and a boatload of stars, but it sags and eventually buckles under the weight of its complicated premise.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 40 J.R. Jones
    There's a lot less here than meets the eye.

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