For 1,480 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1 point lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

J.R. Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 God Bless America
Lowest review score: 0 The Quiet
Score distribution:
1,480 movie reviews
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Hawke’s script is admirably light-handed in showing how the hero’s unreasoning passion is fueled by his parents’ painful divorce, and despite the story’s date-movie aspects, its most penetrating observations come not from the kids but from the young man’s estranged father and mother (Hawke and Laura Linney, both superb).
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Treacle takes over in the last act, but most of this fact-based story by screenwriters Michael Bortman and Allison Burnett takes the inspirational sports drama into unexpected and morally complex territory.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    The movie loses credibility with the arrival of Rogen and Bill Hader as two uniformed patrolmen who are drunker and crazier than any high schooler could ever get, but the variety of complications thrown at the three pubescent heroes raises this a cut above most raunchy comedies.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    After a 40-year career playing jut-jawed a__holes, Michael Douglas must relish the occasional oddball role: he gave a winning performance as the pot-addled professor in "Wonder Boys," and he seems to be having a ball in this funny debut feature by Mike Cahill.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Like "The Verdict," this is a big, crowd-pleasing Hollywood redemption drama in which the lonely hero not only thwarts the corporate villains in the end but silences them with a killer riposte.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    With a score by the Residents, cartoon art by Warren Heise and Timothy Stock, and scenes of the actors commenting on and interacting with the real-life Kurtz, this 2006 advocacy video brings a jumpy energy to its Orwellian tale.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Occasionally a movie's subject outweighs any aesthetic flaws, as it does in this unsettling thriller about the extraordinary rendition of terror suspects.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Bier is one of the cinema's most acute observers of intimate relations, her Scandinavian reserve muting the inherent melodrama of her material, and she draws piercing, modestly scaled performances from Duchovny, Del Toro, Alison Lohman, and John Carroll Lynch.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Cate Blanchett returns to the role that made her a star, and though this sequel to "Elizabeth" (1998) is less defensible as history, as florid costume drama it's just as entertaining.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    It provides a more detailed and perhaps more reliable picture of the early movement's motives and practices than anything I've seen in the mainstream media.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    With one of these two alpha males anchoring nearly every scene, Scott really can't go wrong, but the lead characters are pretty thin, a fact highlighted by generic subplots.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Effective advocacy film about the genocide in Darfur.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    It's a funny and frequently affecting reminiscence from a man whose TV antics obscured a long, respectable career as a stage actor and director.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Once the competition arrives, the premise begins to suggest a marketing hook--it's "Spellbound" meets "The Devil Came on Horseback"!--but by then it's already served its purpose, imposing some structure around memories that would drive anyone mad.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    In this 2006 entry the insights are worthwhile.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    In the finest tradition of adolescent identification figures, he's not only ruthless, dispatching numerous baddies with hair-trigger shots to the head, but profoundly desexualized, brushing off the insistent come-ons of a slinky prostitute (Olga Kurylenko) he's taken under his wing.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Darabont doesn't match the sly cultural commentary of "The Host," a recent Korean import that also revamped the giant-monster genre, but his grocery-store survival drama, dominated by Marcia Gay Harden as a shrill fundamentalist, serves as a crude but effective allegory for post-9/11 America.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Jason Reitman follows his pitch-perfect satire "Thank You for Smoking" with another adventurous comedy, though here the cleverness can be grating; the movie is distinctive for its complicated emotions.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    The popcorn elements are well handled, but what lingers is the sense of urban despair: watching old videotapes of the Today show, carrying on friendships with mannequins, Smith turns out to be no legend at all, just another New Yorker slowly dying of loneliness.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    The story might have been lifted from an old Warner Brothers melodrama, though it's smartly paced, sincerely delivered, and consistently absorbing.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    The narrative conceit requires a fair amount of indulgence as the story progresses, but the fleeting, incomplete glimpses of the monster early on prove the old dictum of B movie auteur Val Lewton that a momentary image can have greater impact than a prolonged one.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    The 3-D element is unobtrusively handled, except when it perfectly re-creates the woman who's always perched on her boyfriend's shoulders in front of you at a concert.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Fascinating: supposedly the crooks kept all the cash and jewelry, but their sponsors in the MI5 were really after sexually explicit blackmail photos of Princess Margaret and other aristocrats that were being held by the revolutionary Michael X.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    A power­ful drama, but if I didn’t know Green had directed it I probably wouldn’t have guessed.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    The outcome is never much in doubt, but Salvadori artfully choreographs the endless table turning, and the Moroccan-born Elmaleh capitalizes on his striking resemblance to Buster Keaton with a similarly comic composure.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    First-time director Chen Shi-Zheng shows great sensitivity to the pressure and isolation felt by Chinese brains at American universities, and the relationship between Liu and Quinn provides a rare look at the intellectual serfdom of graduate study.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Poirer and director Noam Murro have trouble bringing this to a satisfying climax, but the characters are credible and sharply observed and all four actors go to town.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    The movie is so clever and smoothly paced that it's easy to overlook the odious story line.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    It's a classic fight movie, with Chiwetel Ejiofor as an honorable martial arts instructor...But nesting inside is a sour little 70s-style David Mamet play about the lies, calculations, and ice-cold politics of Hollywood, as the fighter is befriended and then discarded by a callow movie star.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    XXY
    Moody and thoughtful.

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