For 1,480 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

J.R. Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 The Proposition
Lowest review score: 0 The Back-up Plan
Score distribution:
1,480 movie reviews
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 J.R. Jones
    The experience couldn't be more realistic, though Cameron also superimposes imagery of passengers recalling the fateful night, to haunting effect.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 J.R. Jones
    In the last two decades rock documentaries have become ubiquitous on TV but marginalized as cinema; this is the rare exception that earns its place on the big screen.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 J.R. Jones
    If you come to this expecting the philosophical depth and psychological detail of Tolstoy’s work you’re sure to be disappointed, but as an actors’ romp it’s delectable.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 J.R. Jones
    After directing three Spider-Man movies, Sam Raimi makes a masterful return to the horror genre.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 J.R. Jones
    A densely textured moral universe that makes good on his metaphoric title-and in this case, the animals are perfectly willing to eat their young.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Overstays its welcome, but for mindless thrills you could do worse.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Director Peter Kosminsky elicits such genuine performances from his talented cast that the film rarely strikes a false note.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    The voice-over narration by Bill Kurtis is a stroke of genius.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    This remake by Joel and Ethan Coen is being positioned as a truer True Grit, and though they take their own liberties with the plot and tone, they preserve Portis's impeccably authentic dialogue, which does more to conjure up the Arkansas of the 1870s than any period trappings.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    There’s no denying this is a coldly commanding tale in which Haneke’s signature obsessions--bourgeois control, sexual repression, emotional cruelty, cathartic violence--simmer quietly as subtext before bursting into the open in the final reels.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Writer-director Celine Sciamma breaks little ground here, but her story is nicely scaled to the gender-rigid world of childhood, where boys playing soccer together take as much pride in their spitting skills as any scored goal.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    This second feature doesn't resonate with nearly as much power, but its suspenseful story of two generations of career criminals in the city's northerly Charlestown neighborhood has a similarly haunting quality.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    The moral dilemmas are perfectly fused with the amped-up action and outsize characters, but they're impossible to miss: like all of us, the people of Gotham have to protect themselves from evil without falling prey to it.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Winter's Bone often seems to be unfolding in a world apart, with its own moral logic and codes of conduct. It might feel like prison if it weren't so obviously home.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    In this littered environment there's no such thing as trash, only salvage, and the biggest threat to the siblings' humanity is a creeping tendency to think of themselves as commodities as well.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    The emotion here is genuine, but the outlook is tough: in Bahrani's movies we're all aliens to each other.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Actor David Morse establishes himself as a truly formidable presence in this powerful first feature by Alex and Andrew Smith.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    The maternal triangle is pretty well handled too, giving a good sense of where Lennon came by all that exuberance and melancholy.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    A funny but genuinely dark story.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Melville's seedy characters and engrossing friendships are well preserved, thanks largely to strategic redeployment of his crisp dialogue. As revamped caper films go, this offers considerably more texture than Steven Soderbergh's "Ocean's 11."
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    This indie drama starts off as a sexy little date movie, but once the lovers have been separated it grows steadily more complicated and mature.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Hysterically funny CGI fight sequences, which pit the chubby superhero against a series of creatures so bizarre they'd keep Hieronymus Bosch awake at night.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    The sentimentality is held in check by Caine, who rises to the occasion with a bleak, angry performance.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    "American Casino" and Michael Moore's "Capitalism: A Love Story" offered more striking images of the human wreckage, but Ferguson is more successful at nailing the perpetrators in New York and their gullible accomplices in Washington.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Near the end Press poses a couple of personal questions that pierce the old man's defenses in the most painful and revealing way, suggesting a much more complicated emotional wellspring for the work that consumes his life.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Reilly's performance here is hilarious: he's located the character in the bursts of shouting he uses to do his job and the warped sense of humor he needs to deal with the weird kids sent his way.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Irish playwright Mark O'Rowe, who wrote the script, has an admirable sense of dramatic proportion that suits his intertwining stories; theater director John Crowley, making his film debut, has a sure hand with his actors; and an excellent cast enlivens this web of romantic and criminal intrigue, set in a gray suburb of Dublin. R.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    As the furiously passive-aggressive title character, Jonah Hill delivers a craftier comic performance than anything in his box-office hits (Superbad, Get Him to the Greek), but what really elevates the story above its shticky premise is the combined neuroses of all three characters.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    The climax, in which the detective's commanding officer gives him a dictionary and subjects him to a sort of linguistic browbeating, is a marvel of dead air and unspoken oppression.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Darkly funny and metaphorically potent.

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