For 1,486 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

J.R. Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 The Simpsons Movie
Lowest review score: 0 Alone in the Dark
Score distribution:
1486 movie reviews
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Highly recommended if you want to watch an assortment of rich movie stars feel your pain.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    This indie drama starts off as a sexy little date movie, but once the lovers have been separated it grows steadily more complicated and mature.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    This time the quest plot involves Asian-American pals Harold and Kumar chasing after a Christmas tree to replace one they've accidentally burned down, but that's only an excuse for the relentless barrage of tasteless gags, most of them damned funny.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 J.R. Jones
    The result is a problem drama with more problem than drama.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Despite some scattered moments of bad craziness involving the hero and his drinking buddies (Michael Rispoli, Giovanni Ribisi), the spine of the story is no strange and terrible saga but a conventional morality tale.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Durkin reveals how the sisters have been pulled in opposite directions by the death of their parents. But the story structure also nurtures a creeping, finally unbearable dread that may have you looking over your shoulder all the way home.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The real problem, however, is the male protagonist and his foul inner life: Almodovar's impressive recent work has focused on the rich emotionality of women, and though the film provides an interesting take on gender and submission, this sort of nastiness just isn't his thing.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Michael Mann was one of the producers, and his daughter Ami Canaan Mann directed; a couple more Manns fill out the credits, which makes you wonder why they couldn't just have a nice picnic and softball game at a state park somewhere.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Chanodr has said that he wanted to portray the 2008 financial meltdown in all its complexity, assigning everyone a fair share of the blame. But the real strength of his debut feature is how persuasively it depicts the fishbowl world of high finance, whose executives seem incapable of seeing past their towering salaries and privileged lives.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Director Anne Sewitsky aims for quirky humanism along the lines of Finland's Aki Kaurismaki; she's helped along considerably by Kittelsen's sunny performance, though the film crosses over into Scandinavian kitsch with a series of country-swing interludes sung a capella by a male quartet.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Shepard is the whole show here, as weathered and elemental as the harsh Bolivian locations; the movie's best scenes are those that pit him against Stephen Rea as a former Pinkerton man who tracked the outlaws for years and can't believe Cassidy is still drawing breath.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    A precious scrap of American history.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 J.R. Jones
    Writer-director Jeff Nichols maintains a cagey balancing act for much of the movie, refusing to specify whether his protagonist is a prophet or a madman, yet in the end this doesn't really matter: the storm inside him is plenty real.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Clooney directed with an actor's appetite for vivid star turns, and he certainly gets them from Ryan Gosling, Philip Seymour Hoffman, and Paul Giamatti.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Even in its truncated state, this is pretty gripping stuff; just think of it as an epic commercial for the director's cut DVD.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Sentimental, obvious, but well-nigh irresistible, this jubilant comedy equates England's bland cuisine with its sexual inhibition and suggests we could all use something a little more tasty (at dinnertime, that is).
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    What begins as a one-night stand deepens, over the next two days, into a genuine romance as the young lovers embark on an epic dialogue that touches on the most profound questions of love, commitment, honesty, and identity.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    He's a fascinating character (even in the person of Gerard Butler), but his conversion from drug-crazed bruiser to psalm-singing family man is so swift and unconvincing that the movie is hobbled from the start. It becomes more engrossing once Childers finds his mission in Africa.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Like many other comedies about serious matters, 50/50 grows more dramatic in its second half. What really impressed me, though, was how easily Reiser could pivot back to comedy at a moment's notice without seeming cheap.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    There's something wrong with a suspense film when the sets are more interesting than the characters.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    The young sweethearts amuse themselves by donning steampunk outfits and crashing the funerals of dead children, which may seem quirky and sweet if you can disregard the awful grief of such gatherings; the problem is that, once you manage this, the main characters' grief doesn't register either.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    Pure punishment, this rote action flick from Australia.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 J.R. Jones
    The real protagonist of Moneyball, however, is Beane himself, played with great charisma by Brad Pitt. (With this movie and "The Tree of Life" competing against each other, Pitt could wind up cheating himself out of an Oscar this year.)
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    There's a good deal of honest emotion onscreen, particularly from the parents left behind to worry, yet the documentary sometimes feels like the work of a filmmaker who began with a preconceived story and wasn't quite sure what to do with the one she actually got.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    The cruel imperialism of the war is just the sort of thing that stokes Sayles's liberal ire, which is one reason the movie so often recalls his proletarian masterpiece Matewan (1987).
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    What has changed, however, is the audience consuming it: back in 1971, the Peckinpah film horrified moviegoers with its bloody climax, whereas today people are so vengeful and sadistic that the remake is just another multiplex crowd pleaser.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Glodell seems to be reaching for the nihilistic buddy romance of a movie like "Mean Streets" (1973), but without the serious intent; despite all the roiling emotions, this begins to feel like a pile-up of macho fetish items and stylistic affectations.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Though it easily surpasses most American action flicks, it suffers from the old commercial imperative of making the protagonist a nice guy, something Refn has seldom bothered with in Europe.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Soderbergh's treatment of the Internet turns out to be the most provocative aspect of Contagion. Like the virus, which destroys any cell it encounters, misinformation spreads rapidly online and tends to cancel out information that might save people.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    The injustice of the girl's thwarted career goes only so far, though Feret pushes it in some interesting directions.

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