Julie Salamon

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For 94 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Julie Salamon's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 After Hours
Lowest review score: 0 Lethal Weapon 3
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 51 out of 94
  2. Negative: 13 out of 94
94 movie reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Julie Salamon
    The director Penny Marshall has gone straight to the heart of this complex story and made a powerfully poignant and illuminating film. She doesn't hesitate to push for the grand sentimental moment, but balances the teary stuff with restraint and humor. To be sure, Awakenings seems calculated to induce weeping -- and it does, without making the weeper feel cheap. [20 Dec 1990, p.A14]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Julie Salamon
    Besides engineering top-notch performances from his actors, Mr. Demme also put together a soundtrack that enhances the movie's marvelous, quirky rhythms. He keeps you hooked into this unpredictable, pleasurable picture right through the closing credits. [6 Nov 1986]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Julie Salamon
    Big
    I am glad to be able to say that all these clever and talented people have actually come up with the goods. The biggest goodie is Tom Hanks as the little boy after his wish has been granted. Much of the comedy in this movie is physical. Without forcing the matter Mr. Hanks has a startling ability to take on the mannerisms and facial expressions of an adolescent. [2 Jun 1988, p.1]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Julie Salamon
    Heathers gave me the creeps but it also made me laugh. This bizarre variation on that Hollywood staple, the teen movie, is one weird original. [30 Mar 1989 p.A12(E)]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Julie Salamon
    To their credit, and to the credit of Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward in the title roles of Mr. and Mrs. Bridge, the movie doesn't condescend to these relics of the recent past, but treats them with poignancy and humor. [21 Nov 1990]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Julie Salamon
    JFK
    It's powerful film making that at the very least accomplishes what Mr. Stone said he set out to do - to offer the world an alternate myth. [20 Dec 1991]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    Mad Dog and Glory also seems like two movies at once, only in this case the split comes off like a case of Siamese twins. Actually, it's girls on one side and boys on the other, and the boys get all the breaks. [4 Mar 1993, p.A12]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Julie Salamon
    Mr. Nichols decided to preserve the jokiness of the original material, even while shifting the emphasis to the mother-daughter conflict. There may have been a way to do this and end up with a clever movie, but Mr. Nichols seems to have had an even cleverer idea: He decided to use this movie as a way to pay back social obligations. [13 Sep 1990, p.A14]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Julie Salamon
    But even as the film's weaknesses make themselves more and more apparent, so does Mr. Turturro's virtuosity. [15 Aug 1991, p.A10(E)]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Julie Salamon
    I never saw the original, but the sprightly remake couldn't be more delightful. As the ultra-suave Lawrence Jamison, Mr. Caine wears his hair and mustache Niven-like -- slicked down but never greasy. He manages to draw more laughs by merely reacting than most comics can pull out of a punchline. With his calculated coarseness, Mr. Martin is a perfect foil. Behind the scenes is former Muppet Man Frank Oz. He pulls the strings so deftly he never disturbs the froth. [15 Dec 1988, p.1]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Julie Salamon
    Like the "girls," the movie is flamboyant in almost every respect - the costumes, the humor and the sentimentality. [1 Sep 1994]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    Whatever the movie's failings, it had enough poignancy and beauty to make me want to find out what was missing. [08 Oct 1992]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Julie Salamon
    Lethal Weapon is vulgar, violent and predictable. Yet, in some outbreak of id, I got caught up in the shenanigans of Danny Glover and Mel Gibson as a mismatched cop team. Mr. Glover is more than solid and Mr. Gibson has added a kind of raw humor to his repertoire that is extremely sexy. [5 Mar 1987, p.1]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Julie Salamon
    Mr. Lyne is able to make things look the way they're supposed to look because he trained in the television-commercial world. But he has a hard time getting beneath the gloss. [17 Sep 1987, p.1]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Julie Salamon
    This clever thriller has the juiced-up, hyperactive feel of a rock video. [07 Mar 1995]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Julie Salamon
    It's a little precious and a little boring, but he has brought out an interesting performance from Adrienne Shelly, who convincingly pulls off a transformation from aimless pregnant teenager to purposeful young woman. [05 Sep 1991]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Julie Salamon
    They have also stripped out almost all complexity, reducing the drama to a familiar match between good and evil. You've heard all the speeches before; only the nouns have been changed. [23 Dec 1993, p.A9]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Julie Salamon
    With his co-writer, Randy Sue Coburn, and composer Mark Isham, director Alan Rudolph has created a sense of time and place that authentically conveys what it might have been like when writers were celebrities and special effects came from words. [10 Jan 1995, p.A18]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Julie Salamon
    A film that is both touching and generous of spirit - and funny as well. [15 Dec 1988, p.A16(E)]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    A warm-heared picture with some hot dancing, some B movie class consciousness, lots of nostalgia and lots of cliches. [3 Sept 1987, p.17(E)]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    Too often the film languishes as Mr. Kasdan poses Big Questions and then has his characters answer them in conversations that are so casual they seem improvised. [26 Dec 1991]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    Silverado looks great and moves fast. Mr. Kasdan has packed his action well against the fearsomely long, dusty stretches of Western plain. [11 Jul 1985, p.1]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 63 Metascore
    • 20 Julie Salamon
    Maybe the worst part (there's so much to choose from) is the sight of a good actor like Edward Herrmann parading around looking like a demented quarterback, the shoulders of his suit jacket grotesquely padded. Mr. Schumacher has dressed the adorable Corey Haim in even weirder getups, jackets with pastel stripes and little outfits that resemble dresses. The vampires aren't nearly as creepy as those clothes. [6 Aug 1987, p.1]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Julie Salamon
    As a metaphysical exploration of otherworldliness, Jacob's Ladder has a kind of morbid intensity, for those who like that sort of thing. The picture flounders, however, with its insistence on injecting a little politics into the paranormal brew. [1Nov 1990, p.A20]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Julie Salamon
    With an edgy, intelligent script by playwright Tom Stoppard, Mr. Spielberg has made an extraordinary film out of Mr. Ballard's extraordinary war experience. [09 Dec 1987]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Julie Salamon
    Though not terribly interesting as political philosophy, A Few Good Men makes for a passably entertaining movie. [31 Dec 1992, p.A5(E)]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    The Man Without a Face is nothing if not respectable, and occasionally it is something more than that. [26 Aug 1993, p.A9]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 61 Metascore
    • 0 Julie Salamon
    One of the least appealing movies I've seen in a while.... When a member of the audience belched loudly, that got the biggest laugh of the day. [17 June 1986, p.E26]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Julie Salamon
    Actually, maybe the movie is better than it seems to be -- I just couldn't understand what anyone was saying. The dialogue came across as clear as schoolyard chatter during recess -- and just about as pleasant to listen to. There is a water slide, a pirate ship and an amusing little chubbikins (Jeff Cohen) who squirts Reddi Wip directly into his mouth. [20 Jun 1985, p.1]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    The movie blurs into a continuum of cars pounding one another and closeups of faces showing disgust, happiness, fear and outrage. It's the kind of shorthand imagery that works best in brief spurts, say, the amount of time it takes for a television commercial to implant a spark-plug brand into your brain. [5 Jul 1990, p.A9]
    • Wall Street Journal

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