Julie Salamon
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For 94 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Julie Salamon's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 After Hours
Lowest review score: 0 Ferris Bueller's Day Off
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 51 out of 94
  2. Negative: 13 out of 94
94 movie reviews
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Julie Salamon
    By the end there isn't anyone to cheer for, except the makers of this thoughtful and absorbing piece of work. [02 Aug 1984]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 58 Metascore
    • 30 Julie Salamon
    I didn't mind the preposterousness of the premise nearly so much as the general ineptness with which it's presented. After all, good trash has its place. [8 Dec 1994, p.A16]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    Green Card is quite pleasant to watch mainly because Mr. Weir hasn't disturbed its simple virtues with undue portent. Sometimes a plate of spaghetti with a simple tomato sauce is just the thing, and this is the movie equivalent of that. [10 Jan 1991, p A12]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Julie Salamon
    It's ended up a weak imitation of the original. [09 Aug 1990]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    The filmmakers aren't out to make a crisp action fantasy like the vigilante movies of the 1970s. Their disaffected man has no specific enemy or at least not one that he acknowledges; modern life is his enemy. This realization hits him one day and he begins to act on it, spontaneously. He's an existential vigilante. [25 Feb 1993, p.A12]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Julie Salamon
    Mr. Murray and his co-director, Howard Franklin, who adapted Jay Cronley's novel for the screen, succeed mainly in illuminating what made them want to direct the material. At least this picture struggles to emit a few gasps of fresh air as it goes down. [19 Jul 1990, p.A8]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Julie Salamon
    Wall Street is a silly, pretentious melodrama that panders to the current fascination with insider trading. [10 Dec 1987, p.1]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 55 Metascore
    • 10 Julie Salamon
    Doc says: "I can't believe this is happening." …That sentence may be the only one uttered in the entire film that contains an ounce of true feeling. Certainly that was the thought on my mind as I watched this depressing rehash of material that seemed original just five years ago, when it was. And "I can't believe this is happening" seemed to be what most of the actors were thinking as they gamely trudged through their paces yet again. [31 May 1990, p.A12]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Julie Salamon
    It's just that the picture doesn't have a strong idea behind it, just a fog of many half-expressed ideas. [26 Feb 1987, p.20(E)]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Julie Salamon
    These fraternal film makers have a lot of imagination and sense of fun - and, most of all, a terrific sense of how to manipulate imagery... But sometimes they seem to be getting too big a kick out of their own shenanigans. By the end, the fun feels a little forced. [26 Mar 1987, p.34(E)]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Julie Salamon
    Despite the numerous predictable jokes about geriatric sex, the movie is very appealing for numerous surprising reasons. Many of them have to do with ice fishing in Minnesota. [9 Dec 1993, p.A14]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 53 Metascore
    • 20 Julie Salamon
    Don't bother to see this film unless you expect to be tested in film class about the Coens' serial dissertation on American cinema. [10 Mar 1994, p.A16]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Julie Salamon
    Matching Danny DeVito and Arnold Schwarzenegger is an amusing conceit played out in an entirely predictable fashion. It certainly isn't harmful, and Mr. Schwarzenegger is kind of cute when he smiles. [8 Dec 1988, p.1]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Julie Salamon
    Hoffman and Beatty are so tone-deaf they don't even know how to play the songs for deadpan humor. They seem old, white, and without shtick. [14 May 1987, p.26(E)]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Julie Salamon
    The movie that remains is lovely to look at, but spiritless, a listless coquette. But then, 9 1/2 Weeks isn't about talk. It isn't about sadomasochism. It isn't even about sex. It's about looking good. [20 Feb 1986, p.1]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    Odd as it seems for a film built on such a grand scale, sweet is the operative word here, and that's not meant as an insult. [29 May 1992]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Julie Salamon
    The picture's blandness - and hollowness - is startling when you consider the collaborators. [26 Nov 1986]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Julie Salamon
    Some of the comedy bits have a delightful freshness and edge while much of the glue (the romance, for example) holding the routines together remains a little sticky. [31 Jan 1989, p.1]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 47 Metascore
    • 10 Julie Salamon
    The movie has the cartoonish realism of a Muppet movie. However, Mr. Herman is no Kermit the Frog, although he made me feel like Oscar the Grouch. [13 Aug 1985, p.1]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Julie Salamon
    These are very small pleasures, indeed, that can be taken as gasps of air in a movie that unwinds for what seems like forever in a complete vacuum. [23 Jun 1994, p.A12]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Julie Salamon
    There weren't any surprises and that's what made it all so comforting. The bad guys got blown away, no questions asked, the snoopy journalists got their comeuppance. When Clint spends the night with his latest girl, you know it only because he wears the same suit the next morning. [21 Jul 1988, p.1]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    This fairy tale is a weirdly enchanting mixture of old-fashioned whimsy and up-to-the-minute special effects. It brings back the early excitement of reading as a child, when the act of turning pages took on a magical quality. [19 Jul 1984, pg.1]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 46 Metascore
    • 10 Julie Salamon
    When director Richard Attenborough isn't mangling dance numbers, he's focusing on a love story expressed almost entirely by means of close-ups of moony faces and teary eyes. [12 Dec 1985]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    With a refreshing absence of earnestness, the movie mainly spins out many variations on a theme: Easy Street begins and ends on Capitol Hill. [03 Dec 1992]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Julie Salamon
    The director Penny Marshall has a gently persuasive touch that keeps the movie's most brazen manipulations from being too offensive. [02 Jun 1994]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Julie Salamon
    The story wanders unconvincingly and tediously into corporate law offices and big, splashy nightclubs. Still, Mr. Hackford has the documentary maker's eye for realistic detail, so it all looks right. [01 Mar 1984]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 42 Metascore
    • 30 Julie Salamon
    The makers of Return to Oz say that their rather bleak, nonmusical fantasy is more faithful to Mr. Baum's vision than "The Wizard of Oz" was. What's appropriate, however, isn't always what's right. All Ms. Balk can do is look earnest and young; Ms. Garland opened her mouth and out came Dorothy's soul.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 39 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    Mr. Carter's intelligent, straight-forward style and the good performances of the young actors prohibit hooting at the story's completely American approach to a German story. [11 Mar 1993]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 36 Metascore
    • 0 Julie Salamon
    It's all played for giggles, this grim anti-humanism. [21 May 1992]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 36 Metascore
    • 10 Julie Salamon
    This time Rambo pulls off his superhuman Soviet-blasting stunts in Afghanistan, not quite as late on the scene as he was in Vietnam. Not very exciting; very noisy. [2 Jun 1988, p.1]
    • Wall Street Journal

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