For 647 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 The Strange Case of Angelica
Lowest review score: 0 The Do-Over
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 53 out of 647
647 movie reviews
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Union certainly dedicates herself to all the huffing, running, jumping and emoting, though her efforts never counter Breaking In’s aura of trashiness and disposability.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Keith Uhlich
    Alex Strangelove is much more affecting whenever Johnson steps out of genre comfort zones.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 30 Keith Uhlich
    Tennant is awful, by which I mean wonderful, by which I mean truly terrible, yet in a legitimately magnificent way…I think. This is a you-can’t-kill-THAT-performance! par excellence, beginning at peak nutball and staying breathlessly atop the trash heap.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    This is, in abstract, a bold and brilliant performance, an act of possession, really, and Smith never personally steps wrong in the film’s 96 minutes. But his work, sadly, is continuously undermined by everything surrounding him, beginning with a script, written by Timoner and Mikko Alanne, that frustratingly sticks to the then-this-happened conventions of a standard biopic.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Sarah’s circumstances are so ridiculously dire that there’s little left to do but laugh at them.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Keith Uhlich
    Superficiality reigns, but then a truly affecting scene will pop up.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Pascal and Thatcher are an outwardly compelling team, though they’re playing constructs instead of characters, hollow vehicles racing through this ragged future as opposed to convincingly long-term inhabitants of it.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Jinn consistently lets down its premise and performers with a by-the-numbers-at-best screenplay that triple-underlines all of its forward-thinking themes.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Whatever pathos is generated comes from Reynolds' commitment to all the self-exploitation. His inimitable charm is still there beneath all the corporeal decrepitude on which Rifkin and company shamelessly linger.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Olin never wavers in her commitment. She's often extraordinary in individual moments.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Keith Uhlich
    Earnest to a fault and soft-edged in its approach to faith (God is more in the margins here than he is a central, narrative-driving presence), yet direct and moving in some scene-by-scene specifics because of their basis in reality.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Keith Uhlich
    One thing's for certain: Not even Charles Darwin could fully figure this monkey out.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 20 Keith Uhlich
    Sandler's drool-accompanied ogling of the female form is now near Woody Allen levels of ick.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    By the end, you'll feel like you've seen it all before. But for a good while, Retake...seems like it's carving out some distinctive new territory in the well-trod world of queer cinema.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Keith Uhlich
    In the moment, the film's simplistic spirit is intoxicating. But take my word for it — the real-world hangover that follows is fierce.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 0 Keith Uhlich
    By now, it's clear that every Adam Sandler movie is dada of the high-concept, low-hanging-fruit variety, in which the Happy Madison stock company uses filmmaking (loosely termed) as an excuse to take an extended tropical vacation.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Keith Uhlich
    It's never fun watching a comedian's shrewdness ossify into shtick. Yet whatever incisiveness Ricky Gervais once had (and he had plenty, if The Office and Extras are any indication) is barely evident in the new Netflix-released satire Special Correspondents
    • 26 Metascore
    • 10 Keith Uhlich
    A wrongheaded, utterly incompetent, and nearly laugh-free satire.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The Young Messiah is just, like, barely competent enough that the faith-based target audience won't feel entirely cheated.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Lumbering, lifeless, and—strange thing to say about a cadaver—almost entirely charmless. Almost entirely because both Lily James, as headstrong heroine Elizabeth Bennet, and Sam Riley, as her brooding suitor Mr. Darcy, make for a delightful onscreen pair.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 30 Keith Uhlich
    No one emerges especially worse for wear because the entire production is wholly apathetic to everything from a compelling story to sharp comic timing.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    One thing’s certain: This is no swoony love story. It intoxicates all the same.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It really packs a punch (bet you saw that one coming).
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    The popular view of art is that it belongs to the masses. Wiseman casts a more skeptical eye, questioning such egalitarianism with cold, hard historical context. Yet he simultaneously acknowledges that these works live on far beyond their original purpose, even if, as the film’s bold, brilliant climax suggests, they may eventually play to an audience of none.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Diplomacy’s origins as a play (written by Cyril Gely and starring the same actors) are always evident. Despite Schlöndorff’s attempts to give the movie some pop through widescreen lensing and noirish lighting, it’s a visually staid affair—very “filmed theater.” Fortunately, both Arestrup and Dussolier are captivating presences.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 20 Keith Uhlich
    What really makes Rudderless a full-blown affront is a late-breaking narrative revelation (no spoilers here) that’s meant to add resonant emotional depth, but instead comes off as jaw-droppingly repugnant. That’s appropriate, though, for a movie with no sense of direction.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Ultimately, this feels like a hagiographic official portrait that takes the sting out of the proverbial bee.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The early scenes of Gabe Ibáñez’s impressively mounted but uneven thriller do some terrific dystopian world-building.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The movie’s admirable fleetness, however, doesn’t mitigate some of its narrative errors — Alexander’s opening voiceover suggests his family is totally oblivious to his role in their misery, which is disproved by a later scene — nor does it counteract an overall sense of slightness that prevents this from being a family-film classic.
    • 12 Metascore
    • 20 Keith Uhlich
    Good God almighty: Not since Edward D. Wood Jr. unleashed a flotilla of paper-plate UFOs on beautiful downtown Burbank has there been a movie as stem-to-stern inept as this adaptation of the bestselling Christian novel series by Tim LaHaye and Jerry B. Jenkins.

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