For 618 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Take Shelter
Lowest review score: 20 Abduction
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 47 out of 618
618 movie reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    No simplistic status parable. It’s more a psychological snapshot of a person forever doomed to remain a voyeur to her own life
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Filmmakers from Jacques Rivette to Hou Hsiao-hsien have treated the City of Light like Alice’s rabbit hole; writer-director Hong Sang-soo similarly embraces the fantasy, but goes one step further in this extraordinary character study by fully erasing the line that separates the actual from the fictional.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Sokurov, who also acted as director of photography, films the character and his surroundings with the eye of a newly arrived visitor to another world.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    It’s likely that only Herzog would dare to, and succeed at, resolving this singular cinematic object by contemplating the fate of an abandoned basketball.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Strangely enough, our knowledge of what’s to come makes Word Is Out that much more affecting, because it shows that there were—and are—pockets of peace amid the brutality of an ongoing civil-rights struggle.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    This is Young in his playroom, grabbing his toys at random while indulging his every antimelodic whim, and Demme’s off-the-cuff approach makes for the perfect aesthetic complement.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    The most impressive aspect of Breillat’s feature is that it agitates like the best fairy tales, seducing us with otherworldliness before sticking the knife in and permanently inscribing the moral.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    The meanings of Close-Up shift, subtly and profoundly, with every viewing; the only certainty is that its rewards are boundless.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Alain Resnais's mind-bending new feature.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Indeed, you leave the film feeling like Wiseman has given you a glimpse of one of those ephemeral ports in a storm to which all of us retreat at times.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    These characters are more than what we see on the surface, and it's thanks to Leigh's rigorous yet generous eye that we never just gawk at the drama.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Its stunningly composed images showing how Isaac is himself something of a ghost-given to staring off into the distance, being condescended to by those around him, a man perpetually outside the times. What he needs is to take that one extra step toward his spectral siren; the scene in which he does so might be one of the most exhilarating visions of death's sweet embrace ever filmed.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    What you see and hear always seems perfectly natural, even if you can't exactly say why. Who needs words when you have cinema?
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    The Tree of Life enthralls right from the start.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    And though not all of Lonergan's conceits work on a scene-by-scene basis (an upper-crust womanizer played by Jean Reno skews a bit too close to caricature), the film has a cumulative power-solidified by a devastating opera-house finale-that's staggering. This is frayed-edges filmmaking at its finest.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Nichols has said that the idea for the film emerged from a free-floating anxiety that he sensed in the world at large, the feeling that everything we treasure in life could be lost in an instant. That sensation permeates this strikingly original movie - especially its enigmatic mind-fuck of a finale, which will haunt you for several lifetimes.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    The Cold War is over, but director Tomas Alfredson (Let the Right One In) and his collaborators have brought those suspicion-fueled days to vivid life in this masterful adaptation of John le Carré's beloved 1974 spy novel.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Sure it is - and a great one at that.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    A dream, indeed. Sure to delight foodies and cinephiles alike.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Those Dardenne brothers…still making great movies with second-nature ease.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Brava, Mia! The exceedingly talented Ms. Hansen-Løve (the writer-director of Father of My Children) is sure to win many more fans with her latest feature, an incisive, exhilaratingly frank examination of l'amour lost.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    This time around, the director documents a 2011 Young solo show in Toronto (the musician's birthplace), but in an intentionally fractured way.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    It's McConaughey who is the real revelation: All Grim Reaper strut and cutthroat stare, he savors each of Letts's vividly ghoulish lines.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    It is the richly evocative performances of Marion (aggressive yet enticing) and Merhar (wearing world-weariness like an aged suit) that cut deepest.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Wang has made a confidently intimate movie that is devastatingly larger-than-life.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    It isn't until the story reaches its fancifully abstract final passages, where cinema displaces music as Douglas's weapon of choice, that Chase's reverie reveals itself as a particularly exceptional exploration of how art ceases being an idle hobby and becomes an obsessive vocation.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Moreover, the story doesn’t climax in all’s-well-that-ends-well matrimony, instead building to a beautifully bittersweet moment of self-realization, one with a light-touch profundity that would make the Bard proud.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Gallo and Dalle are sublimely tragic figures; the scene in which Shane stalks around Notre Dame like Frankenstein unleashed is a pitch-perfect encapsulation of the way the film plays with and deepens movie-monster archetypes.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    If Jim Jarmusch’s languorous, laconic style isn’t your bag, his stone-faced vampire comedy won’t make you a believer. Those who’ve already been bitten, however, will swoon like the film’s toothy leads whenever their lips touch neck juice.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    You could hardly ask for a more beautiful vision of souls in transit.