For 600 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 The Sun
Lowest review score: 20 Beastly
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 44 out of 600
600 movie reviews
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The thought behind this body-splattering nostalgia trip is unformed and stagnant.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Only "Slumdog Millionaire's" Dev Patel, as the bastard prince of the villainous Fire nation, truly gets jiggy with the fantasy. Everyone else stares off into green-screen space and waits for lunch to be called.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Kilcher makes the slog worthwhile--her face gleams with possibility, even in the character’s darkest moments--though one prays she escapes the typecasting trap ASAP.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The film blows up a minor aspect of the New Wave to foolishly apocalyptic proportions, substituting gossip for gospel.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    It’s a neurotic treatise that simply adds to our cultural dementia instead of illuminating it.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Zack Snyder's films have some of the best opening-credits sequences in cinema; the unfortunate thing is that there's always a movie after them.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The stylistic conceit of keeping us entirely with the clones (so that we are as ill-informed as they are and never get to meet their powerful oppressors) only reveals what an empty-headed abstraction this tale was from both page and frame one
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    There’s little of the Church’s perspective in this doc, but you can’t really fault the filmmakers--Mormon leaders refused several overtures to participate. Read more: http://newyork.timeout.com/articles/film/86550/the-mormon-proposition-film-review#ixzz0r2j38wUF
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Cue those weepy violins. Indeed, you get everything you'd expect from this mostly saccharine melodrama.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    It's supremely annoying to see the ups and downs of romance reduced to archer-than-arch line readings and bloodless mortal kombat. What's more frustrating is that the film, adapted from Bryan Lee O'Malley's popular comic, is an endless visual delight.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    This is the kind of autumnal sentimentality that the Academy goes wild for-a (rightly) venerated performer acknowledging his own mortality by pandering to cheap-seat emotions.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    This highly fictionalized look at the Wild West early days of Internet porn is off-putting in almost every way, with sledgehammer stylistic flourishes (incessant shaky-cam; a Rolling Stones musical cue as ironic comment) and dialogue that sounds like it was written in a testosterone-fueled haze.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    From the moment Joel Schumacher's dour teens-in-crisis melodrama establishes its group of spoiled (and so, so unloved) Manhattan silver-spooners, you long for anything to leaven the tsk-tsk prurience.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    There's no sense of the oppression France felt under Nazi rule. It's all just play-acting in period-specific attire. You can almost hear the AD calling lunch.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Notwithstanding Brown's occasional half-baked critical comment about the sport's corporatization, the film ends up as a cliquish circle jerk that flatters those in the know and leaves neophytes little to mull over.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    There's more than a few things off in this tale of a disillusioned professional thief (Affleck, dull), his unlikely inamorata (Hall, wasted) and the determined FBI agent (Hamm, solid) out to apprehend him.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman's mostly whiffed docudrama makes the influential poem by Allen Ginsberg (Franco) seem dull, ordinary, pedestrian instead of pioneering.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    For those of us with a love of actorly indulgence, though, the film is a treasure trove, filled with enough molten-gold performances to gild a thousand Oscars.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    This routine animated feature is a perfectly fine thing to waste.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The Rock deserves better than this ho-hum revenge picture.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    One's heart sinks the moment the trio is picked up by Prince Caspian (Barnes) and deposited on his ship, the Dawn Treader. Suddenly we're in green-screen land, where everything looks cheap, heavily digital and unfortunately postconverted to 3-D-hardly a fantastical otherworld.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Injecting a devil-may-care attitude into a franchise-focused blockbuster only gets you so far. When all is said and done, this wasp's got no sting.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Despite the chronological juggling, the film's stylistic debts (a Hitchcock flashback borrowed from Stage Fright, a Bertolucci-esque apartment sequence that could be titled Last Tango in Auschwitz) are simplistic to a fault; they lack the multifaceted suspense and sensuality typified by those directors at their best.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Leaving is a tawdry potboiler slathered riotously in portent, complete with a lamebrained detour into vengeance that only Claude Chabrol would be able to pull off.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    What starts as an intriguing reverie ends as a hollow allegory.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    This 3-D cave-diving adventure plays on a lot of fears, so avoid it if you have an aversion to claustrophobia, drowning or really bad acting.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Several quick-witted touches-such as a hilarious nod to Depp's role in "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas"-can't make up for Gore Verbinski's leaden direction of this digitally animated feature.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Clearly there's a lot of myth-dispelling to do; indeed, the film often seems like a public-service announcement wrapped around a sketchy narrative skeleton.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    For an especially egregious bit of miscasting, look no further than Mena Suvari, star of this tony adaptation of Ernest Hemingway's posthumously published novel about a disintegrating marriage.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    It's "Centurion Deux" without the second-coming-of-Carpenter pretense, though you still wish the trashiness were more distinctive.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    It's a pleasure to watch the granite-faced action star do his own stunts, particularly a death-defying leap from a bridge. Yet everything feels hurried.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    An hour and half of comparable barbarity follows-all of it monotonous, none of it enlightening.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The film has the look of unflinching truth, yet it too often feels like a calculated ploy to stoke viewers' liberal-guilty consciences.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The title character himself is also an unimpressive digital creation-Rogen might as well be performing his stoner-from-another-world shtick during a wee-hours movieoke session.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Hop
    The various plot threads-E.B. is pursued by a trio of ass-kickingly cute long-eared operatives; a disgruntled worker chick (voiced in emphatic Telemundo tones by Hank Azaria) orchestrates a coup d'état-mostly get lost amid all the allusions. Even Hugh Hefner pops up because, you know, Playboy Bunnies.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Since this is a House of Mouse production, sentimental order must inevitably be grafted onto nature's pitiless chaos. The cornball voiceover ascribes human wants and desires to the animals.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    There's shockingly little thrill in watching Carano bounce off walls and pummel antagonists.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    As billion-dollar Hollywood franchises go, this is one of the drawn-out dumbest. The stake through the heart comes not a moment too soon.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Favreau's direction is so boulder-heavy-the action sequences, especially the climactic assault on the alien mothership, are an eye-and-ear-shattering mess-that the small moments of poetry...are lost amid too much digital sound and fury.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    It's just another franchise nonstarter to toss in the superstore superhero deal bin.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Spencer, a superb performer mainly known for small character parts, gives a star-making turn as the won't-take-no-guff Minny.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Whenever this Lantern returns to terra firma (too often), its imaginative flights are ground down under the Warners overlords' demographic-pandering heels.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The highlight, though, is Julie Christie as Grandma, whose GILFy gorgeousness (especially in the "better to eat you with" scene) is the only thing in this overblown campfest with real teeth.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    As we work our way back to that cliff-hanger of an opening, it becomes clear that the movie is no acid critique, but a hollow endorsement of high living. Guess every generation gets its "Boiler Room."
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The razzle-dazzle can't distract from the monotonously overstuffed spy-film plot.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Though both lead actors are able to coast for a while on their natural charm, it's evident by the soppy finale that their "Sleepless in Seattle" and "Pretty Woman" salad days are long past.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    All the problematic aspects of the Hollywood bad boy's filmography - reactionary rah-rah patriotism, sneer 'n' drool female fetishization, callously detached bloodletting - remain in soul-shattering force.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The trek to get there is sluggish at best, torturous at worst. March away, penguins. Far away.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Best is Viggo Mortensen's William S. Burroughs proxy Old Bull Lee, holed up in a perspiration-saturated Louisiana mansion with a shell-shocked Amy Adams and a gas-huffing chamber at the ready.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Niccol's attempts at satire are toothless.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Trespass is assembly-line product through and through - unabashedly mediocre and instantly forgettable. A Joel Schumacher joint, in other words.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Madden pads the film with shimmering images of Jaipur and its surroundings; a midmovie funeral sequence - 'cause somebody's got to kick the bucket! - even manages to be somewhat evocative and moving. The rest makes you long for senility to set in, but quick.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The unintentional hilarity of the whole enterprise - especially when Albert attempts to romance one of the hotel's naive employees (Wasikowska) - at least keeps you engaged, as does the scene-by-scene suspense over which pitiably wide-eyed expression Close will choose to use next. Hopefully, she's practicing her gracious-loser face for awards season.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    By the time Nick decides to have an emotionally purgative yard sale-the primary holdover from the short story-all the adult ambiguities have been traded in for facile Indiewood profundities.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Simon Curtis's watchably third-rate biopic doesn't try to sort out truth from fabrication; that would be like "teaching Urdu to a badger," as the short-tempered Olivier - played by a whole-hog-slicing Branagh - might say. Better to print the legend and be done with it.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Ceremony passes by quickly and painlessly, its annoyances easily forgotten. On the plus side, Thurman and Angarano do work up a sweet odd-pair chemistry.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Good actors like Vera Farmiga and Brendan Gleeson show up to bust balls and bark expository dialogue with check-in-the-bank-yet? proficiency. Add in a couple of dully pro forma narrative twists to keep you awake in between shots of distractingly exotic South African scenery, and you've got a first-quarter Hollywood release par excellence. Meaning not.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Credit the appealingly paired McAdams and Tatum for making this Valentine's-month hokum watchable.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    That all sours by the time of the film's "shocking" climax, which is so hilariously telegraphed, it plays like a Benny Hill gag rather than a tear-duct stoker.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The movie amounts to little more than Marky Mark's South American Vacation.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The director races far too quickly to get to his ashes-to-ashes, dust-to-dust punch line. This is the film of a pretender, not a believer.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The voice work sounds more quick-paycheck than impassioned, and the animation rarely rises above video-game cut-scene quality. As revisionist holiday fables go, you're better off watching Aardman's delightful "Arthur Christmas" than this lump of coal.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Aside from a few inspired vistas and alien life-forms (the Road Runner–fast red planet dog Woola is sure to sell a bazillion action figures), John Carter is as deadly dull as its basso-voiced, beefcake slab of a star, Taylor Kitsch.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    This isn't the NASCAR-fellating cash grab that is the Cars franchise, but it's still Pixar on preachy autopilot.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Aside from a few witty Looney Tunes–esque sight gags, such as one hilarious image of a woolly mammoth being swallowed up by the tectonically shifting earth, the stereoscopic visuals are a busy, personality-free digital blur.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    This was Italy's official submission for Best Foreign Film to the 2011 Academy Awards (a red flag more often than not), and, sure enough there's little here that rises above middlebrow.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Writer-director Nick Tomnay needlessly convolutes what should have been a taut, focused two-hander with flashbacks, alternate realities and too-clever-by-half reversals.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Mostly laugh-free black comedy, which gathers an impressive cast - Marisa Tomei, Jennifer Connelly and Ciarán Hinds round out the ensemble - for bad sitcom-level shenanigans.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Though it holds your attention all the way through to an enigmatic, spiritually tinged climax, the movie leaves you wanting more than the Vega Vidals' secondhand artistry is able to provide.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The movie builds to a particularly deflating anticlimax, passing over an inevitably apocalyptic confrontation between spheres with a wink-wink, nudge-nudge bit of dialogue that’s like a rejected punchline from a Douglas Adams novel.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    If What to Expect represents the best tearjerking laugh-machine that Hollywood can birth, it's probably time to get those story ideas implanted in vitro.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    There is no depth or resonance to anything we see and hear-everything is as it seems, no more, no less, and the reactionary superficiality dulls the senses. General Orders No. 9 strains for elegiac profundity and ends up as bad, backward-looking poetry.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Plays like a tiresomely extended evening of channel surfing.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Much cut-rate melodrama ensues, none of it particularly painful to watch, until a ridiculously redemptive finale negates almost all of the preceding dramatic tension and resurrects a cloying Richard Marx chestnut to boot.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    It's all too much and not enough—a succession of disparate, can-you-top-this episodes inelegantly piling up like skidding cars on a freeway. And that's not even taking into account the action scenes. Lord, those action scenes: Monotonous, loud and relentless, they're a punishing example of the self-satisfied, digitally augmented ephemera that typifies modern Hollywood moviemaking, and House Bruckheimer in particular.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    This iron lady of cinema deserves better.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    At least the Abrams-helmed Star Trek from 2009 had a pretzel-logic playfulness; the portentously subtitled Into Darkness is attempting like hell to be a Trek for our troubled times. The franchise has been thoroughly Christopher Nolan–ized.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The film doesn't come within spitting distance of vintage Landis, e.g., "Animal House" or "An American Werewolf in London." But at least it's not "The Stupids."
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    So narratively old-fashioned it creaks.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Who would have thought that the man behind such wackadoo fantasies as "The Professional" and "The Fifth Element" was capable of being so bloody boring?
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    What undoes the film is its rather rancid parent-child sentimentality (a Shyamalan staple, admittedly) and a charisma-free performance from the younger Smith that suggests the apple has fallen very far from the tree.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The more the visual ephemera piles up, the more the emotional thrust of the story gets buried beneath all the monotonous pageantry. (Anna's many tête-à-têtes with her two lovers - especially a should-be-dizzying dance-seduction scene - are frigid pomp without any real heat.)
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Irritated, you realize you've been watching an object that's all surface, no soul.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Though based partly on actual events, Ruben Fleischer's ludicrous shoot-'em-up plays fast and loose with the facts, and plenty else besides.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Shorn of its quintessentially American roots, a biting tale of adult extravagance becomes insubstantially tween-aged.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    As in the first film, the seasoned-pro cast provides the few fleeting pleasures to be found.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Sadly, most of the film's dull edges have to do with De Niro, who is clearly in rest-on-his-laurels mode; at his worst, he approaches radioactive, Robin Williams levels of bathos, as when Jonathan - roaring like a bush-league Lear - is banned from the shelter for bad behavior.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    A better movie would have explored Foster's way-of-the-future objectives with more beyond-the-hype insight and less Zen-master bullshit.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The satire becomes more scattershot and strangely cuddlesome (didja know sequestered holy men enjoy socializing and playing sports, just like us?), while the usually great Piccoli-saddled with a ridiculously contrived failed-actor backstory-comes off like an unholy mix of Gérard Depardieu and Robin Williams at their sad-puppiest. That's some cinematic blasphemy, Moretti.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    As with many young-adult book-to-film series, Beautiful Creatures plays like an illustrated compendium of scenes from the novel, as opposed to a finely tuned narrative all its own.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Only Gandolfini comes off as a character as opposed to an effigy, his sad-sack posture and f-it-all unprofessionalism truly capturing the tragedy of a working man with a one-way ticket to 99-percenter hell.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The story's treacly all-souls-in-alignment outcome is never in doubt, but as Kasdan dogs go, this is light-years better than Dreamcatcher.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    This is mostly all reefer, no madness.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Cluzet and Sy nonetheless make for ingratiating foils; the extended opening sequence in which the duo outwits a pair of cops like a hell-raising Laurel and Hardy could be a stellar short comedy if it weren't married to the deadly self-serious shtick that follows.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    360
    Scene by scene, you want to laugh at all the ham-fisted kismet, even if the committed cast holds your attention. Hopkins is especially good in his chaste May-September interactions with Flor, and he has an AA confessional that is genuinely moving.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Whether blithely comparing American prisons to retirement homes or gleefully recalling the time he chewed off his own fingers in Siberia, the moonlighting German New Wave auteur injects some much-needed black humor into what is otherwise a soporific star vehicle.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    It almost becomes comical to count the number of "who's holding the camera now?" reverse shots that the filmmaker haphazardly inserts to propel the story forward. Such visual ineptitude, like much else in this tediously cocky enterprise, is downright criminal.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    It’s only when the sentient snacks are front and center that this middling sequel to the 2009 animated hit truly comes alive.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The satire rarely stings, as first-time feature directors Declan Donnellan and Nick Ormerod give a polite Masterpiece Theatre gloss to this most impolite of tales.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Gerwig is plenty charming, considering the rote stuff she has to work with. Yet this still feels like a real devolution - hopefully short-lived - after her distinctively eccentric turns in "Greenberg" and "Damsels in Distress."