For 593 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Neil Young Trunk Show
Lowest review score: 20 Night Train to Lisbon
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 44 out of 593
593 movie reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The oft-hilarious push-and-pull between director and subject - Williams wryly notes that the film is turning into "the Steve and Paulie Show" - effectively hacks away at the celebrity-enthusiast divide. By the end of this perceptive dual portrait, both men are content to merely be human.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It's in between the lines that this movingly perceptive film scores a TKO.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Puzzling and provocative, Alps has a lingering power and an effect that is thrillingly difficult to define.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    What most distinguishes the redo is the often remarkable use of 3-D: Miike turns the format's inherent limitations, especially the tendency toward visual murkiness, to his advantage, fully immersing us in a world suffused with moral and ethical rot.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Sensitive parents shouldn't fret; this is the kind of grim fairy tale, equal parts midnight-movie macabre and family-round-the-hearth compassionate, that scars in all the right ways.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Coleman's life and work are treated as a continuum, which Clarke pulls from at will.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Imagine if Frederick Wiseman and David Lynch had a bastard child, and you'll get a sense of the movie's off-kilter aesthetic, a potent and pointed mix of firsthand observation and surreal flights of fancy.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    No side overwhelms the other in the back-and-forth; you feel more like a profoundly uncertain moment is being marked, with little concrete sense of the outcome beyond mankind's enduring hunger for moving pictures.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A cut above most nonfiction explorations of Katrina, thanks to the ever-empathetic Demme's talent for showcasing the uniquely human qualities of every person he films.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The movie might very well have come off as a too-clinical experiment if it weren't for Leo, who maintains a rivetingly mysterious aura even as her character's behavior becomes increasingly bizarre.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The impressively lean script by Alex Garland (28 Days Later) is shorn of almost all superfluity beyond a few dud Schwarzeneggeresque kiss-offs, while Anthony Dod Mantle's sensational widescreen cinematography harkens back to the tension-inducing inventiveness of early John Carpenter.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Meier is clearly carving out a path all her own; the next one should be a gem.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Mileage will vary from viewer to viewer as to whether this singularly eccentric movie is ultimately illuminating or enervating.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Skyfall has the feel of both a ceremonial commemoration and a franchise-rebooting celebration, especially in the ways it attempts to too cutely sync up the '60s-era Bond mythos (casual misogyny and all) with the more complicatedly "Bourne"-inflected recent episodes.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A mesmerizing study in excess, Peter Jackson and company's long-awaited prequel to the Lord of the Rings saga is bursting with surplus characters, wall-to-wall special effects, unapologetically drawn-out story tangents and double the frame rate (48 over 24) of the average movie.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    As in his much-lauded "4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days," the latest feature from Palme d’Or–winning filmmaker Cristian Mungiu takes a rigorous approach to the material. But where the previous film — about two women seeking a back-alley abortion — was a reductively dour slog, Beyond the Hills feels more caustically all-encompassing.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    There are few artists better than Rivette at uncovering the magical (even at its most menacing) in the everyday.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The man himself has rarely been profiled without noticeable reluctance, though documentarians Molly Bernstein and Alan Edelstein delve fairly deep by allowing their subject to guide them where he may.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Delon and Crenna paint an idealized portrait of masculine camaraderie, one that’s exposed at the end of Melville’s bracing last testament as a soul-shattering illusion.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    What matters more is recognizing Post Tenebras Lux’s kinship with a strain of impressionistic autobiographical cinema practiced by filmmakers such as Andrei Tarkovsky (The Mirror) and Terrence Malick (The Tree of Life) in which every sound and image seems to spring straight from the psyche.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Hollywood movies have rarely spoken such tough and tender truths.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The creepiness builds with symphonic precision until reality truly is indistinguishable from fantasy.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It still works its way under your skin and, by the time the highly disturbed Frank’s casualties come back to haunt him en masse, cuts sanguinely to the heart.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It’s high time Pedro had a lark. The buoyant and bawdy I’m So Excited plays like a to-hell-with-it-all riff from this seminal Spanish auteur, an excuse to gather his stock company for a breezy 90-minute party.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Jordan’s poetic sensibilities more than make up for any flaws. His uncanny aptitude for conjuring up resonantly metaphorical images — from a pointed fingernail pushing toward a vein to a waterfall turning into a literal river of blood — proves there’s plenty of life left in this undead genre.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Every monster-movie archetype is here, from nerdy scientists (Charlie Day and Burn Gorman) to hard-stare leaders (Idris Elba) with a penchant for 11th-hour inspirational speeches. (Watching the former Stringer Bell bellow about “canceling the apocalypse!” is one of those great, giddy pleasures you didn’t know you needed.)
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    What’s past is prescient, and what it all means is beside the point. Let’s just say Bujalski has made a prankishly out-of-time movie about that other AI: mankind.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Fortunately, Oppenheimer keeps the film focused on the highly complicated Anwar — a charismatic devil if ever there was one — observing as this strange reckoning with the past slowly breaks down his defenses.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Not a bad setup for a cops-and-robbers thriller, and in the hands of action-movie maestro Johnnie To, the result comes very close to greatness.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The sights are gorgeous—a seamless mix of archival imagery and impressively rendered digital views of our galaxy—and the science is, to layman’s eyes and ears, more than credible.