For 621 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 The Headless Woman
Lowest review score: 20 Jonah Hex
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 47 out of 621
621 movie reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    By the end, you feel curiously closer to the performer and her process without having any clue how you got there. It's exhilarating.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The creepiness builds with symphonic precision until reality truly is indistinguishable from fantasy.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It’s high time Pedro had a lark. The buoyant and bawdy I’m So Excited plays like a to-hell-with-it-all riff from this seminal Spanish auteur, an excuse to gather his stock company for a breezy 90-minute party.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Toward the end of the film, a few hard-hitting cuts between young and old brings the title's meaning home: These children have an inescapable life of drudgery before them, and there's little likelihood it will change anytime soon.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    This lifelong Tintin fan was more than pleased, even while having to acknowledge that the movie lacks the subtle state-of-the-world commentary that Hergé often smuggled into his creation.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Even at a mere 75 minutes, Silent Souls is thrillingly dense and allusive, and the elegiac finale maintains the overall air of mystery while beautifully bringing all the disparate threads together.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Jordan’s poetic sensibilities more than make up for any flaws. His uncanny aptitude for conjuring up resonantly metaphorical images — from a pointed fingernail pushing toward a vein to a waterfall turning into a literal river of blood — proves there’s plenty of life left in this undead genre.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    As engrossing as it is maddening, Pierre Thoretton's documentary on the sale of Yves Saint Laurent's extensive art collection is perched somewhere between a sanded-edged official portrait and a keen examination of affluence run amok.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Losier has made a quietly revolutionary work that treats a pair of people on the fringes with the decency all humans deserve.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The impressively lean script by Alex Garland (28 Days Later) is shorn of almost all superfluity beyond a few dud Schwarzeneggeresque kiss-offs, while Anthony Dod Mantle's sensational widescreen cinematography harkens back to the tension-inducing inventiveness of early John Carpenter.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Polanski has made a genre piece with a verve and vitality that’s in sadly short supply.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The tone this time out is primarily comic.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It’s almost impossible to describe the narrative specifics of The Past without making the movie seem ridiculously hammy. Indeed, several twists involving Samir, a dry cleaner with plenty of his own troubles, tip a bit into hoary melodramatics.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    There’s a sense that all the thematic messiness is intentional, a way for Jia to diagnose the ills of a country whose economic and social fabric is wilting under the effects of rapid modernization.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Like :Carnage,: it’s a bit of a minor lark until a deliciously grotesque finale pushes it into the realm of such kinkily profound Polanski films as: Cul-de-sac: (1966) and "The Tenant" (1976). By that point, you can’t help but submit to the perversity.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The man himself has rarely been profiled without noticeable reluctance, though documentarians Molly Bernstein and Alan Edelstein delve fairly deep by allowing their subject to guide them where he may.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Bellocchio counters these flaws with an energetically combative aesthetic (he makes you feel like you’re riding out a sociopolitical tempest, careening between perspectives) and an overarching humanism that gives equal weight to the many feelings stirred up by this hot-button situation.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Imagine if Frederick Wiseman and David Lynch had a bastard child, and you'll get a sense of the movie's off-kilter aesthetic, a potent and pointed mix of firsthand observation and surreal flights of fancy.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It’s nice to see this great filmmaker sculpting something that feels genuinely revelatory. That’s not to say that the 3-D Goodbye to Language is always an easy sit.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Sensitive parents shouldn't fret; this is the kind of grim fairy tale, equal parts midnight-movie macabre and family-round-the-hearth compassionate, that scars in all the right ways.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    You still leave hoping he ultimately found peace and enlightenment, two things he graciously gave to those of us who hung on his every word.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    No side overwhelms the other in the back-and-forth; you feel more like a profoundly uncertain moment is being marked, with little concrete sense of the outcome beyond mankind's enduring hunger for moving pictures.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    In comparison with near-impenetrable Garrel efforts like "Regular Lovers" (2005) and "Frontier of the Dawn" (2008), Jealousy cuts straight to the heart.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The real beauty of Maidentrip is how it downplays the go-for-glory aspect of the tale (this adolescent mariner’s aim is to become the youngest person ever to sail around the world) to focus on more earthly matters like the isolation and loneliness of the voyage or the lingering effects of the divorce that irrevocably shaped Dekker’s life.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It would be risible if Ozon’s hand didn’t remain so steady and confident throughout, all the way up to a complicatedly upbeat conclusion that recreates the Christian Annunciation with the straightest of faces.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Mileage will vary from viewer to viewer as to whether this singularly eccentric movie is ultimately illuminating or enervating.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    This fascinatingly knotty movie never becomes a facile screed against the powers that be. Instead, it plays as a more relaxed and leisurely requiem for a slowly vanishing way of life, with sounds and images-a time-lapse contemplation of the cosmos is in the running for scene of the year-that are as mesmerizing as they are subtly pointed.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Godly as the monks are, they are still human-which makes their ultimate sacrifice all the more devastating.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    What matters more is recognizing Post Tenebras Lux’s kinship with a strain of impressionistic autobiographical cinema practiced by filmmakers such as Andrei Tarkovsky (The Mirror) and Terrence Malick (The Tree of Life) in which every sound and image seems to spring straight from the psyche.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The point, of course, is to get lost. As the soft-spoken sage himself notes, “The world is a very puzzling place.” What a pleasure it is, the film suggests, to be perpetually befuddled.

Top Trailers