For 619 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Wild Grass
Lowest review score: 20 Everybody's Fine
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 47 out of 619
619 movie reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Toward the end of the film, a few hard-hitting cuts between young and old brings the title's meaning home: These children have an inescapable life of drudgery before them, and there's little likelihood it will change anytime soon.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Fassbender and his multifaceted allure helps counteract any thematic or conceptual shakiness, as was the case in McQueen's highly uneven debut, "Hunger." One thing's for sure: McQueen has found his De Niro, and he better keep him close.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Despite his repentance, you sense that this lost soul will be confessing his sins for all eternity.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    When the action eventually switches to an Austrian rehab retreat, Dalle gets to make like the best of the Old Hollywood divas and waste away with devastating reserve - an icon quietly, crushingly crashing to earth.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    First-time director Josh Trank, working from a taut script by Max "Son of John" Landis, indulges in some wild, witty spectacle, but he's equally adept with the tale's grimmer elements, especially when the introverted Andrew unleashes his inner Magneto and uses the city of Seattle as his tear-it-apart emotional playground.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Losier has made a quietly revolutionary work that treats a pair of people on the fringes with the decency all humans deserve.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Watching the formerly spry Harris struggle to maintain a normal life (he's frequently glassy-eyed and jacked on painkillers) emphasizes the underappreciated sacrifices our men and women in uniform make in the name of vaguely defined ideals.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Though the film wraps up its spinning-plates narrative a little too neatly, this is still a Scandi-noir to die for.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A 25-words-or-less pitch for The Day He Arrives - shot in luminous black-and-white - might go something like: "Hong Sang-soo does Groundhog Day."
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The oft-hilarious push-and-pull between director and subject - Williams wryly notes that the film is turning into "the Steve and Paulie Show" - effectively hacks away at the celebrity-enthusiast divide. By the end of this perceptive dual portrait, both men are content to merely be human.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It's in between the lines that this movingly perceptive film scores a TKO.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Puzzling and provocative, Alps has a lingering power and an effect that is thrillingly difficult to define.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    What most distinguishes the redo is the often remarkable use of 3-D: Miike turns the format's inherent limitations, especially the tendency toward visual murkiness, to his advantage, fully immersing us in a world suffused with moral and ethical rot.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    No side overwhelms the other in the back-and-forth; you feel more like a profoundly uncertain moment is being marked, with little concrete sense of the outcome beyond mankind's enduring hunger for moving pictures.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Meier is clearly carving out a path all her own; the next one should be a gem.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Coleman's life and work are treated as a continuum, which Clarke pulls from at will.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Imagine if Frederick Wiseman and David Lynch had a bastard child, and you'll get a sense of the movie's off-kilter aesthetic, a potent and pointed mix of firsthand observation and surreal flights of fancy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A cut above most nonfiction explorations of Katrina, thanks to the ever-empathetic Demme's talent for showcasing the uniquely human qualities of every person he films.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The movie might very well have come off as a too-clinical experiment if it weren't for Leo, who maintains a rivetingly mysterious aura even as her character's behavior becomes increasingly bizarre.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Mileage will vary from viewer to viewer as to whether this singularly eccentric movie is ultimately illuminating or enervating.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It’s high time Pedro had a lark. The buoyant and bawdy I’m So Excited plays like a to-hell-with-it-all riff from this seminal Spanish auteur, an excuse to gather his stock company for a breezy 90-minute party.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    As in his much-lauded "4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days," the latest feature from Palme d’Or–winning filmmaker Cristian Mungiu takes a rigorous approach to the material. But where the previous film — about two women seeking a back-alley abortion — was a reductively dour slog, Beyond the Hills feels more caustically all-encompassing.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Scorsese, that sly spiritualist, is out to make us sick on commerce and greed run rampant. He moves us beyond the allure of avarice so that we might take better stock of ourselves. What starts as a piggish paean becomes, by the end, an invigorating purge.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Jordan’s poetic sensibilities more than make up for any flaws. His uncanny aptitude for conjuring up resonantly metaphorical images — from a pointed fingernail pushing toward a vein to a waterfall turning into a literal river of blood — proves there’s plenty of life left in this undead genre.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It still works its way under your skin and, by the time the highly disturbed Frank’s casualties come back to haunt him en masse, cuts sanguinely to the heart.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Fortunately, Oppenheimer keeps the film focused on the highly complicated Anwar — a charismatic devil if ever there was one — observing as this strange reckoning with the past slowly breaks down his defenses.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    There are few artists better than Rivette at uncovering the magical (even at its most menacing) in the everyday.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The man himself has rarely been profiled without noticeable reluctance, though documentarians Molly Bernstein and Alan Edelstein delve fairly deep by allowing their subject to guide them where he may.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    What matters more is recognizing Post Tenebras Lux’s kinship with a strain of impressionistic autobiographical cinema practiced by filmmakers such as Andrei Tarkovsky (The Mirror) and Terrence Malick (The Tree of Life) in which every sound and image seems to spring straight from the psyche.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Delon and Crenna paint an idealized portrait of masculine camaraderie, one that’s exposed at the end of Melville’s bracing last testament as a soul-shattering illusion.

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