For 633 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 64% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Jiro Dreams of Sushi
Lowest review score: 0 The Do-Over
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 52 out of 633
633 movie reviews
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The first part of Deathly Hallows has plenty of invigorating imagery alongside the pro forma narrative elements.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The intention outweighs the execution, though there are still pleasures to be had.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 20 Keith Uhlich
    You can practically taste the grime in Jorge Michel Grau's art-house horror show-the film looks like it's been slathered with gooey discards from a backyard barbecue.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    A believably unbalanced Bening scores the movie’s true coup: Karen’s revitalizing relationship with a sweetly persistent coworker (Jimmy Smits) is a rare example of Hollywood doing right by midlife romance.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Every monster-movie archetype is here, from nerdy scientists (Charlie Day and Burn Gorman) to hard-stare leaders (Idris Elba) with a penchant for 11th-hour inspirational speeches. (Watching the former Stringer Bell bellow about “canceling the apocalypse!” is one of those great, giddy pleasures you didn’t know you needed.)
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The curtain can't come down fast enough.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    At least Mark Ping Bing Lee’s luscious cinematography distracts from the shallow storytelling. There are worse things than luxuriating in a two-hour Côte d’Azur travel ad.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The movie is never less than involving, but rarely amounts to more than a third-generation grindhouse knockoff.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The survey the film provides is bracing, and there are plenty of talking heads to guide us through the kaleidoscope of imagery. Unfortunately, there’s also a public-television vibe to the proceedings that mutes the overall power. It’s essential info presented with little imagination.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    When the action eventually switches to an Austrian rehab retreat, Dalle gets to make like the best of the Old Hollywood divas and waste away with devastating reserve - an icon quietly, crushingly crashing to earth.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The scenes of the film’s exuberant, frizzy-haired protagonist wandering Naples and revisiting old haunts, however, seem much more unfocused—a ramshackle search for insights into the man’s art and life that rarely come. The instruments are in tune, but the rhythm is off.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Only Gandolfini comes off as a character as opposed to an effigy, his sad-sack posture and f-it-all unprofessionalism truly capturing the tragedy of a working man with a one-way ticket to 99-percenter hell.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Strikingly picturesque locations and a terrific ensemble cast help this tonally inconsistent adaptation of Posy Simmonds's comic series pass by with relative ease, though it leaves a very peculiar aftertaste.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It's an equally insightful and excruciating journey, with our quip-ready protagonist perpetually caught between two modes: eager-to-please caffeinated and near-breakdown frustrated.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Despite the faux-realist aesthetic (gritty handheld camerawork; all-natural sound), we never feel like much is at stake, though Pistereanu and Condeescu have an easygoing rapport that makes the quieter moments between them affecting.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The satire becomes more scattershot and strangely cuddlesome (didja know sequestered holy men enjoy socializing and playing sports, just like us?), while the usually great Piccoli-saddled with a ridiculously contrived failed-actor backstory-comes off like an unholy mix of Gérard Depardieu and Robin Williams at their sad-puppiest. That's some cinematic blasphemy, Moretti.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    These scenes make you wish the rest of the movie had similar bite, but Gibney tends toward that dutiful doc style that mixes talking heads and archival clips into a flavorless stew—a bland complement to Fela’s zesty on- and offstage presence.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The Horse Boy comes off as both an edifying work of advocacy and an invasive home movie.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Moment to moment, the film is gripping and beautiful to behold (props to cinematographer Masanobu Takayanagi for the mesmerizingly grainy, achromatic visuals). But caveat emptor to those expecting a hinterlands gloss on "Taken" with rapacious curs in place of nefarious Albanians.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Somewhat underwhelming sequel.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    As to the movie's three sections, the best comes first, as an eclectic "cast" of characters (among them philosopher Alain Badiou and musician Patti Smith) pontificate their way around a lavish Mediterranean cruise ship.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There's so much right with Gareth Edwards's low-budget alien invasion tale that you almost want to brush aside everything that's not up to snuff.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The promise Dumont once showed has ossified into unholy shtick.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Fortunately, a few striking sequences break up the tedium.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Cheap Thrills is little more than low-budget torture porn for the doobie-addled dudebro contingent.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The more the visual ephemera piles up, the more the emotional thrust of the story gets buried beneath all the monotonous pageantry. (Anna's many tête-à-têtes with her two lovers - especially a should-be-dizzying dance-seduction scene - are frigid pomp without any real heat.)
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman's mostly whiffed docudrama makes the influential poem by Allen Ginsberg (Franco) seem dull, ordinary, pedestrian instead of pioneering.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A cut above most nonfiction explorations of Katrina, thanks to the ever-empathetic Demme's talent for showcasing the uniquely human qualities of every person he films.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Even at its most affecting, Simon Killer rarely seems like more than a cinema-du-Gaspar-Noé simulacrum. The languorous long-takes, dissociative sound design and strobe-light scene transitions meant to mirror this emotional con artist’s skewed view of the world are anxiety-of-influence hand-me-downs through and through—viscera without vision.

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