For 619 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 National Gallery
Lowest review score: 20 Goodbye World
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 47 out of 619
619 movie reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Godly as the monks are, they are still human-which makes their ultimate sacrifice all the more devastating.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    New Yorkers and those who've been following the neighborhood's plight know exactly how this ends; at the very least, Paravel and Sniadecki have preserved the memory of what was. Sometimes, that's the most you can do.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The film builds to a shattering climax that works precisely because all involved fully embrace the melodrama. Be sure to bring Kleenex.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A moving meditation on history, knowledge and mortality.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The film suddenly gains in power, until it fulfills the promise of its title with hard-hitting compassion and a crystal-clear sense of grace.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The film isn't blinded by Candy's beauty and celebrity; it digs critically, if still empathetically, beneath.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    As engrossing as it is maddening, Pierre Thoretton's documentary on the sale of Yves Saint Laurent's extensive art collection is perched somewhere between a sanded-edged official portrait and a keen examination of affluence run amok.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    This is prime Woody Allen - insightful, philosophical and very funny.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A movie with an unflinchingly tough heart.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    This fascinatingly knotty movie never becomes a facile screed against the powers that be. Instead, it plays as a more relaxed and leisurely requiem for a slowly vanishing way of life, with sounds and images-a time-lapse contemplation of the cosmos is in the running for scene of the year-that are as mesmerizing as they are subtly pointed.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It's an equally insightful and excruciating journey, with our quip-ready protagonist perpetually caught between two modes: eager-to-please caffeinated and near-breakdown frustrated.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It never feels as if we're watching a brand-name cash-grab, but instead as if we're participating in an endlessly imaginative afternoon of play.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Jendreyko elegantly sketches in the details of his subject's life and the historical events surrounding her coming-of-age-out of which emerges a fascinating subtext about the malleable powers of language.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The filmmaking is patient and participatory, getting down in the dirt with the workers (in one case the lens is even soaked by a spray of sludge) and allowing several touchingly distinct personalities to emerge.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Toward the end of the film, a few hard-hitting cuts between young and old brings the title's meaning home: These children have an inescapable life of drudgery before them, and there's little likelihood it will change anytime soon.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Even at a mere 75 minutes, Silent Souls is thrillingly dense and allusive, and the elegiac finale maintains the overall air of mystery while beautifully bringing all the disparate threads together.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A lesser movie might hammer home the idea that the cult squashes Martha's sense of self. This distinctive and haunting effort implies something much scarier: that there is no self to start with.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    This is an exquisite portrait of a family navigating the wreckage imparted to them by one of their own.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It would be a Christmas miracle save for one lump of coal: an ear-shattering Justin Bieber song over the end credits. Gotta sell something to the kids at Yuletide.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Fassbender and his multifaceted allure helps counteract any thematic or conceptual shakiness, as was the case in McQueen's highly uneven debut, "Hunger." One thing's for sure: McQueen has found his De Niro, and he better keep him close.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Leigh does a stellar job of showing how these events seep into the unaware girl's everyday existence - almost all of the film's sequences are photographed in precisely composed, inherently surreal single shots.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    This lifelong Tintin fan was more than pleased, even while having to acknowledge that the movie lacks the subtle state-of-the-world commentary that Hergé often smuggled into his creation.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Despite his repentance, you sense that this lost soul will be confessing his sins for all eternity.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    When the action eventually switches to an Austrian rehab retreat, Dalle gets to make like the best of the Old Hollywood divas and waste away with devastating reserve - an icon quietly, crushingly crashing to earth.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The mostly dialogue-free middle section is a scare-film master class - and when a becalmed smile does finally cross his lips, it's in the most giddily mordant of circumstances. As Arthur embraces the darkness, so does the darkness embrace us.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    First-time director Josh Trank, working from a taut script by Max "Son of John" Landis, indulges in some wild, witty spectacle, but he's equally adept with the tale's grimmer elements, especially when the introverted Andrew unleashes his inner Magneto and uses the city of Seattle as his tear-it-apart emotional playground.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Watching the formerly spry Harris struggle to maintain a normal life (he's frequently glassy-eyed and jacked on painkillers) emphasizes the underappreciated sacrifices our men and women in uniform make in the name of vaguely defined ideals.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Losier has made a quietly revolutionary work that treats a pair of people on the fringes with the decency all humans deserve.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Too many movies come to us as preordained cult objects - this is the real deal.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A 25-words-or-less pitch for The Day He Arrives - shot in luminous black-and-white - might go something like: "Hong Sang-soo does Groundhog Day."

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