For 1,706 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ken Fox's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Iraq in Fragments
Lowest review score: 0 Superhero Movie
Score distribution:
1,706 movie reviews
    • 58 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    The real surprise here is Lewis, who seems to have finally hit on a role that balances her usual flakiness with smarts and an offbeat poignancy, and she delivers the strongest work of her adult career.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    The fact that Pastor Fischer would probably consider the film an accurate portrayal of her mission may be the most terrifying thing of all.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    Don't be put off: Hernandez's exquisite romance works on an emotional, as well as intellectual, level.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    Mock's film leaves us with a sense of gratitude and relief that so thoughtful an artist as Kushner continues to work among us, capturing and reacting to the world as he buzzes through it.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    If you've never given much thought to the lives affected each time you choose one brand of coffee over another, allow this handsomely mounted documentary from British filmmakers Marc and Nick Francis to serve as a bracing, double-shot of reality.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    A nonstop cavalcade of Roth-style animation starring Rat Fink, vintage footage, artfully animated black-and-white film, and fanciful "interviews" with beautifully preserved cars of the era.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    As the film makes pointedly clear, ALS is what is considered an "orphan disease," meaning drug companies aren't willing to devote their resources to finding a cure because they feel too small a percentage of the population suffer from it to make an effective drug profitable.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    The most infuriating revelation in Amy Berg's powerful documentary is the lengths to which current Los Angeles Cardinal Roger Mahoney and other church officials went to protect Father O'Grady and themselves, even though it meant knowingly delivering countless other children into a child molester's hands.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    Bogumil Godfrejow's raw cinematography and Huller's poignant, close-to-the-bone performance transform what might have been a morbid curiosity into an entirely enthralling, quietly terrifying experience.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    The freedom to answer Hamlet's nagging question over whether to be or not for oneself is explored in this thoughtful and thought provoking documentary about the Swiss organization EXIT AMD.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    The film avoids theorizing about why the bridge should exert such a hold over the imaginations of suicides all over the world, but Steel's dramatic cinematography, particularly the distorted telephoto shots that make the bridge loom even larger than it already does in life, provide one answer.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    Christensen simultaneously avoids all the cliches that might have been heaped upon her beautifully rendered characters and roots their travails in everything that makes for a good soap: tragedy, tears, sexual tension, misplaced letters and a slightly sardonic voice-over that teases the plot lines like the old-fashioned, "tune in tomorrow" narrator of yesteryear.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    Davaa's second fable of animals and the people who love them mixes aspects of ethnographic filmmaking with heart-grabbing story lines that wouldn't be too far out of place in a 1950s live-action Disney feature.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    Neil Armfield's film hits hard because it sensitively shows how life on drugs can never be about anything else, and how the real horror of addiction is not what users do to themselves, but what they do to each other out of loneliness and despair.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    The line separating "fan" from "fanatic" has never seemed as thin or as permeable as it does in this harrowing, and at times surprisingly humorous, case study from actress-turned-director Emmanuelle Bercot.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    The film's sweetness derives primarily from the relationship between Ashmol and his unusual sister, and draws much of its richness from the unfamiliar and fascinating world of opal prospecting.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    Novice filmmakers Arin Crumley and Susan Buice's charming homemade movie is a surprisingly successful experiment in collaborative creativity that sprang from a larger artistic project: their own real-life relationship.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    Writer-director Daniel Burman's dryly humorous, poker-faced comedic style is once again in full play in this funny and touching film about a young Argentine man and his aging father, both of whom happen to be lawyers.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    This is sentimentality of the best kind, a touching display of male bonding amid terror and aching loneliness worthy of Howard Hawks at his finest.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    Carries an important and timely reminder about the fate of torture victims, so deftly wrapped within a touching and beautifully acted melodrama that the result is the furthest thing from a didactic message movie.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    The film unfolds with all the heart-stopping suspense of a true-crime expose that sheds light on the twisted policies of Kim Jong-il's strange and secretive nation.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    Bolstered by a beautifully shaded performance by Karanovic as a woman attempting to escape the torments of her past while securing a future for her daughter, Zbanic's film begs a pretty complex question: Is a love story possible in the aftermath of torture and genocide? The answer appears to be a tentative yes, both on the levels of the film and filmmaking, but it isn't easy.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    Groning's approach gives the viewer a rare chance to really listen to what water sounds like when it drips from a tin bowl, or the watch what patterns raindrops make when they fall on a shallow puddle -- purely sensual, cinematic experiences. In such moments we sense the point of view of a patient, sensitive filmmaker.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    At times funny, but mostly tragic, Scurlock's film is important viewing for any who owns a credit card without realizing that it's a wallet time bomb.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    A funny and touching adaptation of Pulitzer Prize-winner Jhumpa Lahiri's novel about two generations of Bengali-Americans attempting to reconcile the world of their collective past with that of their individual futures.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    Poignant and sometimes downright hilarious, much of the film unfolds in the small area outside the arena -- an "offside" penalty box for women who just won't behave.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    The film flows like a sinister and unsettling piece of music, from gripping overture to the tightly orchestrated movements to the unforgettable coda.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    With a third-act twist that outdoes that initial revelation, the film turns out to be a thoughtful exploration of paternity and responsibility. Much of the film's success lies in Bier's sensitive direction, but credit is also due to the fine cast, particularly Mikkelsen.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    Academy Award-winning live-action-short director Andrea Arnold makes a startlingly assured debut with this low-key psychological chiller.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    Vibrant, funny and tragic documentary.

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