For 507 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 27% same as the average critic
  • 20% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ken Tucker's Scores

Average review score: 76
Highest review score: 100 Homicide: Life on the Street: Season 4
Lowest review score: 16 Real Time With Bill Maher: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 21 out of 507
507 tv reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Ken Tucker
    There’s not much verbal wit in Trollhunters--the jokes are pitched to a kid audience that has probably heard better ones in DreamWorks feature films such as How to Train Your Dragon and Shrek. But it looks terrific, with sleek animation that moves back and forth between human and troll worlds with fluid skill.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Ken Tucker
    I have to give Marling and Batmanglij credit: I don’t usually have much patience for humorless, convoluted hooey like this, but their narrative pacing, and some of the performances ... are enthusiastically committed and effective.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 30 Ken Tucker
    It lacks any character as vital and vivid as Taraji P. Henson’s Cookie. The dialogue is overwrought, and frequently tells us the very things we’re seeing on screen. The trio of aspiring stars are plucky, but they’re not very interesting, and neither is the music they sing.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Ken Tucker
    When Shut Eye focuses on the often separate-but-equal storylines of Linda and Charlie, it’s intriguing; the more it peels off into a tedious storyline about their son’s high school life or the illegal doings of Rossellini’s gangster empire or the strong-arm tactics of the gangster (you’ll wince at a death-by-boiling-oil in a doughnut shop), the more diffuse the series becomes.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Ken Tucker
    Scenes of cage-match violence are regularly inserted to break up the boring office scenes of people sitting across from each other at desks, jawboning about corporate strategies. The result makes the future seem like a more extreme version of the present, which, in turn, is simply depressing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Ken Tucker
    Toward the end of the premiere, Remini is shown saying she’s hearing the same stories “over and over”--that the abuse and harassment former members are subjected to have similar traits. Unfortunately, that’s not much of an incentive to keep watching her series, which even during the first hour becomes a little repetitive. Nevertheless, Remini comes across as a sincere crusader.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Ken Tucker
    The entire enterprise is sentimental and predictable, which goes without saying. What pulls it all together is what pulls together everything Dolly Parton touches: heartfelt emotion, un-ironic portrayals of modest sincerity (Nettles and Schroder are particularly effective), and a gift for turning treacle into musical gold.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Ken Tucker
    Overall, the pacing of the new Anne is rather slow, but not so much that it ruins the underlying heartfelt emotions that make just about every variation on Anne of Green Gables irresistible.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Ken Tucker
    The show works as a comedy, as a satire of the way certain people live now and of the true-crime genre in its search for Chantal. Search Party’s half-hour episodes zip by so quickly, you’ll probably binge on them sometime during the upcoming holiday.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Ken Tucker
    A tremendously moving documentary.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Ken Tucker
    Each individual hour of The Affair holds your attention, and perhaps it’s best to just keep watching before deciding whether the overarching narrative is cohering in a satisfying way.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Ken Tucker
    Some of the best aspects of A Year In The Life are the ways the four episodes continue, and deepen, the show’s richest themes.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Ken Tucker
    In general, the further Shooter strays from Phillippe’s character, the weaker the show becomes.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Ken Tucker
    Letty may be a hot mess, but she’s an essentially decent person--why, she even listens to self-help tapes to try and psych herself into leading a better life. But if you let the show carry you along--especially into the strong second episode, directed by Carl Franklin--you may find yourself rooting for these antiheroes.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Ken Tucker
    Oaks remains assiduously small-scale, and that only works toward its charm. (Compared with ABC’s blasting ’80s sitcom The Goldbergs, Red Oaks is a masterpiece of low-key discretion.) The pacing is sometimes tediously slow, but for the most part, Oaks is cozily welcoming.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 10 Ken Tucker
    [A] brutally crude dramatization of the crime and its aftermath.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Ken Tucker
    Morgan and director-producer Stephen Daldry make the show engrossing both as history and as a drama about family ties.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Ken Tucker
    As good as Anderson is throughout, her Stella suffers from a Season 3 lack of development--we learn nothing about her in this new season that we did not know from the previous two (apart from a couple of small autobiographical details dropped in the final hour). And some characters who had been important to the series--I’m thinking particularly of John Lynch’s cop Burns--recede or fall away in disappointing ways.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 30 Ken Tucker
    A sub-Mad Men piece, filled with trite characters and anachronistic dialogue.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 20 Ken Tucker
    I found Bell to be one of the least likable protagonists in a prime time series in a while, which is really saying something in a season that has given us Notorious and Bull. ... Mulroney, not one of the liveliest of TV leading men, doesn’t just bring gravity to his role, he weighs it down with cement blocks.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 Ken Tucker
    It’s aimed at millennials yet making fun of them constantly, and aimed at McHale fans while putting the star in his least-flattering light.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    None of these characters is particularly happy or remotely satisfied with his or her station in life, and in a lesser show, they’d be depressing downers. But thanks to the writing of show creator Ray McKinnon, these are people who strike you as folks you know, or whom you may be yourself.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Ken Tucker
    All in all, not a great episode, but a savage and a useful one.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Ken Tucker
    The show is well-staged; it’s just that there’s not much of a show.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Ken Tucker
    The whole thing comes wrapped in music: a couple of typically clever original numbers, and incidental touches such as a novel use for Scott Joplin’s ragtime touchstone “The Entertainer.” Even the show’s theme song undergoes a re-think; as Rebecca explains, it’s “an emotional thesis statement for myself.” It’s this kind of self-consciousness--tart and pointed, yet not excessively vain--that gives Crazy Ex-Girlfriend its lift.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Ken Tucker
    All in all, it’s a season of Black Mirror you’ll enjoy if you like your sci-fi/fantasy/horror laced heavily with social commentary. Me, I wish the messages were ladled on with a lighter hand.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Ken Tucker
    There isn’t much to laugh at in this production, which has taken its arch irony and presented it with an earnestness that works against the nature of the material.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Ken Tucker
    At its best, the TV show has a bit of a Hitchcock feel (the doomed romance of Vertigo) and an even stronger pull toward Brian De Palma’s Hitchcock homage Obsession (1976). At its weakest, Chance is melodramatic.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Ken Tucker
    Against the odds, Jane the Virgin has managed to sustain the premise that began the show--a variation on a telenovela for The CW network--with an admirable degree of inventiveness. Satire on television just isn’t supposed to last this long, let alone continue to be so resourceful and clever.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Ken Tucker
    As Eyewitness proceeds, there are some credibility-stretching coincidences and relationships that are revealed that you might find difficult to accept without rolling your eyes--some of the plot strands tie together rather too neatly. But Nicholson is terrific, and if you’re in the mood for a bleak mystery in the same general area of The Killing or Top of the Lake, Eyewitness is worth a look.

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