Kimberley Jones
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For 681 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Before Night Falls
Lowest review score: 0 The Women
Score distribution:
681 movie reviews
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The Duplass brothers have an exceptional eye for microexpressions (yes, they're still zoom-happy), and there's something to be admired in this new interest in a macro lens on the universe's workings. If only it didn't take wading through so much drear to get to that divine.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    In all his misguided enthusiasm, Parker has mustered enough bluster to fill up a zeppelin, blowing harder and harder, for something more and more fanciful. But with so much hot air, the bubble is bound to burst, and so it does in Parker's blundering adaptation.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    More often than not The Heat is just stupid-funny, which circles us back to McCarthy, motor-mouthing four-letter fury like an operatic aria. She sells Mullins as delightfully unhinged and fairly radiating with rage, and it’s irresistible.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Has a heart bursting with good intentions, something that goes a long way in dimming from memory its inherent routineness.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Three actors play Bobby at different ages, and none of them quite jibe with the other – 16-year-old Bobby seems far savvier than the twenty-something version (who is played by a defanged Colin Farrell).
    • 59 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    High spirits mark the first half of the film; quite simply, these guys are just fun to be around – most especially Howard, all half-lidded, cat-who-got-the-cream coolness.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    To a one, they nail the humor, all right, but they also, quite crucially, humanize the high concept.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    A clever idea that never stretches beyond just that -- a caterpillar that never blooms into a butterfly.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The spirit of the thing – the way it champions intellectual curiosity and critical thinking – warmed this nerd’s heart tremendously.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Screenwriters Andy Paterson and Frank Cottrell Boyce (who wrote many of Michael Winterbottom’s early films) adeptly shift the action back and forth between these two timelines, and the drama – exterior and interior – is engrossing in both tracks.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    With "50/50," his last stint in the director's chair, Levine upended convention to make a feel-good cancer movie. He's still defying expectations: In animating the inner workings of the undead, he's made a movie that is both clever and heartfelt.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    An admirable effort, but too many words, words, and more words, and not enough of the ache of that half-smile.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Somewhere in that chirpy half-pint frame dwell some meaty comic chops. Goldie Hawn may have found her successor.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It all boils down to trying too hard, when everybody knows a good grift is one that appears effortless.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    If LaBute wants to plumb the depths of human unkindness, have at it -– only dig deeper next time.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    LaBeouf plays Jacob as no naif – he can be as slippery and savage as the next suit – but there's also real tenderness in his scenes with Mulligan and Langella (in a small but significant role as Jacob's mentor).
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Terrio's technically proficient film is mature, modern, and minus the all-important passion and risk.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    There’s a surprising – and truthful – melancholic undercurrent to Definitely, Maybe – the one commonality between the three women is the heartbreak they induce – but Brooks undermines that truthfulness with a dogmatic insistence upon romantic mythologizing. No maybes about it: The reality is far darker, and more interesting.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Occasional animated inserts inspired by Chantry’s work as an illustrator, while accomplished, inject an off-note of whimsy that doesn’t quite square with the script’s stabs at edgier humor.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Does Apatow understand his heroes are assholes?
    • 59 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Terribly tender, good-hearted picture.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    After a sparky first half greatly aided by Kristin Scott Thomas' devilish turn as an unsentimental press secretary, Salmon Fishing grows soggier. It's such a pretty, witty gloss of a picture, it hardly knows what to do with real-world terror, hence the Snidely Whiplash-like limning of Muslim extremists.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    God Help the Girl is not so perfectly crafted, but the promise – oh, the promise is irresistible.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Once the film gets cooking, the questions never stop. For instance: When you find the dead body of someone you love, isn’t your first call to the cops?
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Much of the original film's geniality – and all of its pro-environment stumping – has gone missing; what we have instead is a watered-down likeness that curiously turns disaster flick in its too-scary third act.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    With all its emphasis on beat, Brown Sugar can't maintain a steady one, yet when it finds it, the film surely soars.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The landscape and the lovers are pretty to look at, but two households divided should really pack more of a punch.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The supposedly epic battle the entire film builds toward – the single action set-piece – is a ho-hummer. Fire and ice, turns out, was an oversell: Think tepid tap water instead.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Once a crucial piece of backstory is revealed, the picture becomes more rewarding for it, emotionally and aesthetically, but that doesn’t temper the feeling that half the film was wasted on arty misdirection.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The terrific ensemble acting and Troche’s genuine, nonjudgmental interest in exploring the weird places wounded people go, both internally and externally, amount to an insulated but moving portrait of the real nuclear family.