Kimberley Jones

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For 795 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)
Lowest review score: 0 Meet the Spartans
Score distribution:
795 movie reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Sweetgrass’ unbroken shots of often-repetitive activity have a beguiling quality to them, their very monotony encouraging a deeper absorption and reflection, but hard facts aren’t easy to come by.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Undeniably gripping stuff.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    It's all about the little things, and the way in which the little things can steal into your heart in big ways.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    An entirely sympathetic portrait of the artist at an advancing age. That's right, artist – and to a generation that knows Rivers only as a screeching red-carpet provocateur or as an overknifed monstrosity, that revelation alone is worth the cost of admission.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    A Most Violent Year is its own thing, hypnotic and exacting and as subtly savage as mellow-voiced Marvin Gaye’s “Inner City Blues (Makes Me Wanna Holler),” which opens the film and sets the tone. I was fully in thrall to it all.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Kinsey is too tasteful by half, and while it may have its gentle charms, it never thrills.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The material begs for a much longer consideration than the film’s trim 79 minutes, but it’s still a must-watch for serious film fans.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Post-viewing, I was still coasting on the giddy high of kinetic cinema, only to have the astonishing callousness of its conclusion slowly settle in. It's a better film for it – one only wishes that Reprise on a whole had been of the same mind: a little less cool, a little more cruel. That's where the really good stuff is.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Is nothing if not foreign, but not in the sense of national demarcations of language and custom. It speaks a different cinematic language, one that tosses off the usual rules of camerawork and narrative structure.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    An ambitious comedy with not-negligible dramatic depth, but Bell, a first-time feature writer and director, is frankly too generous with her large cast.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Keep the Lights On feels like a first-rate, late-Seventies experimental student film, or early Scorsese. But then the cycle of addiction takes over the film, and the plot about stagnancy ends up stagnating the film itself.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    This documentary does boast some bowl-you-over reveals best experienced blind.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    This drama-horror hybrid, set within a New York ballet company, strikes a tone more along the lines of the terrifying hallucinatories of Aronofsky's breakout film, "Requiem for a Dream," revisiting, too, favorite themes of monster mommies and female hysteria.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    I can't remember the last time I felt so seduced by a film.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    But for all the film's griminess and doom, bad behavior and bad luck, it's hope that engines Head-On.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Swinton is heartbreaking. She's not just craft; she's high art.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Is nothing if not exquisitely detailed: It's like a blood orange that del Toro spends the film seductively unpeeling, revealing layer upon layer of meaning and pathos.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    A rattling and ruminative piece of speculative fiction, Ex Machina is good enough to wish it were even better.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It’s always a pleasure to be in the company of Potter, and when looking back at the just-competent first outings – well, baby, you’ve come a long way – but still: Where’s the magic, huh?
    • 78 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Ramsay is experimental, unconventional, and forever reaching at the gorgeousness in grief and despair. Her film moves slow as molasses, slow as paint drying -– and all the better to see the colors and the complexities.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    A riot of sight and sound that, however baffling, has an irresistible, elemental pull.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Where "Finding Nemo" capitalized on the awesome splendor and danger of the ocean, this follow-up shifts much of its action to an aquatic park and becomes broader and sillier, or at least reality-busting, for it.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The Dogme pedigree rarely distracts; there is too much emotional investment to care much about dogmatic fidelity.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Cue the footage of Cockettes in spangles and glitter, high-kicking and belting out show tunes at the top of their lungs. Damn, it looks grand.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The Immigrant is two hours long, but I stayed even longer in my seat, through the credits, still in thrall to it all. The title is singular, but the scope is not so easily quantifiable.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    I recognized a lot of my younger self in The Edge of Seventeen. It’s crummy that teenagers just shy of 17 won’t get the same chance.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Provides no revelations and left this viewer, at least, puzzling over whether the picture Cunningham has allowed to develop of him is completely transparent or utterly impenetrable.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    As Lo and Behold anecdotally lays it out, in the blink of the eye of human history, this invention has become essential, and in another blink – a solar flare, or cyberwarfare – its failure could trigger a civilization’s collapse.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Maggie’s Plan is an ensemble piece, with Maya Rudolph, Travis Fimmel, and a magic, romantic New York rounding out the cast. They’re all great, but it’s Gerwig who’s just so damn gosh-wow.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Filmmakers nicely mix the historical and the tributary, honoring both Bennett's cultural landmark and the dancers who dream of joining its ranks.

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