Kimberley Jones
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For 706 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Force Majeure
Lowest review score: 0 A Haunted House
Score distribution:
706 movie reviews
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The script also takes the occasional dip into hokeyness, but even that is buoyed by its ballsy leading ladies.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The balloon will resurface throughout, but far more interesting, and substantial, is the slow reveal of Simon's domestic situation.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The U.S. cut, which Wong endorses, runs a slim 108 minutes, and has by all accounts been reshaped for American audiences, who, by and large, don’t have the same foreknowledge of Ip Man, or martial arts, as Asian audiences do.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Three actors play Bobby at different ages, and none of them quite jibe with the other – 16-year-old Bobby seems far savvier than the twenty-something version (who is played by a defanged Colin Farrell).
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    A pretty spot-on distillation of human weakness, but my god, must they all be so inhumane in the process?
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    To a one, they're terrific. But in this overpacked ensemble cast, it's Binoche you want to see more of.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It’s best to situate yourself in the middle of the row; a seat at the end will most likely leave you feeling cross-eyed for an hour.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Rush, a film about two real-life titans of Formula One racing in the Seventies, splits its narrative between these oil-and-water personalities, which feels about right: It's only half of a good movie.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It all adds up to a portrait in decency, which isn’t nearly as sexy as the title would suggest.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    I suspect it's that spirit as much as the injustice of her incarceration that drew so many people to her cause and inspired this labor-of-love documentary about her journey to hell and back.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Subtle it ain’t, but there’s an undercurrent of palpable rage that pokes through the (very funny) banter-banter gloss of the thing, and the actors rip into it with relish.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The Descendants is beautifully shot (by Phedon Papamichael) and compellingly performed, especially by its young stars, and it has moments of startling tenderness. If only it didn't feel phony to its bones.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Once a crucial piece of backstory is revealed, the picture becomes more rewarding for it, emotionally and aesthetically, but that doesn’t temper the feeling that half the film was wasted on arty misdirection.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    All told, it’s a likably misfit little movie, even if you can imagine it better suited as a lengthy short film or as a superior installment on one of those midcentury television playhouse series.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Manages the neat feat of feeling sweetly inevitable rather than boilerplate predictable.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Cornish, in her first film seen stateside, is astonishing.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Screenwriters Andy Paterson and Frank Cottrell Boyce (who wrote many of Michael Winterbottom’s early films) adeptly shift the action back and forth between these two timelines, and the drama – exterior and interior – is engrossing in both tracks.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    [Keaton's] lost none of the spunk, sass, and ditzbomb charm of her "Annie Hall" days. She, quite simply, is marvelous. Too bad her similarly iconic co-star is such a toad. Jack never stops being Jack, to great distraction.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Provides no revelations and left this viewer, at least, puzzling over whether the picture Cunningham has allowed to develop of him is completely transparent or utterly impenetrable.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It's all vastly superior to Brett Ratner's scorched-earth "X-Men: The Last Stand," of course.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    After the recent rash of superhero end-spectacles as long-winded and self-serious as a term paper, the limited ambition of The Dark World’s climax is a relief. It scuttles all term paper aspirations and instead humbly lobs a thesis statement-slash-open invitation: Let’s have some fun, shall we? And so we did.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    You can’t read one of Clooney’s endless People profiles without hearing the Cary Grant comparison, but here, he’s all Gable – same rakishness and stubble and tanned-leather basso profundo.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Snyder has cast Man of Steel with dramatic actors, not action stars, and it pays off.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Franklin injects life into a flat format and has in the process done something nearly unheard of in Hollywood as of late: He's brought class back to the genre film.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The former mayor is an alert onscreen presence, but the film surrounding him is not always so lively.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Ao relentlessly, gleefully dumb -- without being the slightest bit sardonic -- that you just can't help but guffaw … or groan … but probably both.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Filmmakers nicely mix the historical and the tributary, honoring both Bennett's cultural landmark and the dancers who dream of joining its ranks.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    With the documentary Ballet 422, Lipes’ first return to dance after notable narrative cinematography work (on TV’s Girls and the upcoming Trainwreck, among other projects), he’s somewhat boxed himself into a corner with the cinema verité directive to capture the moment and keep out of the way.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Movingly captures the terrors and delights of being lovesick at 17. Would that it hadn't felt constrained to target only the 17-year-olds.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Tonally, it all makes sense, but there’s such a thing as overmuchness. Gibney laudably launches a withering attack here on the pay-to-play relationship between lobbyists and lawmakers. But this viewer felt withered, too, by the end of his battering ram of a movie.

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