Kimberley Jones
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For 677 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 The Grand Budapest Hotel
Lowest review score: 0 View from the Top
Score distribution:
677 movie reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The former mayor is an alert onscreen presence, but the film surrounding him is not always so lively.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    There isn’t a false step from the quietly devastating Farahani; her tour-de-force performance carries the film through its rocky stretches.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Blue Is the Warmest Color has its wobbles, but Exarchopoulos will knock you sideways.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Somm doesn’t try to write the book on wine connoisseurship, but it does give good CliffsNotes.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The issue of late-term abortions tends to inspire polemics from both sides of the debate; Shane and Wilson’s approach – sensitive, measured, workmanlike – is a welcome one.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The material is interesting, and the production values are top-notch. Anushia Nieradzik deserves special notice for her costume design; her luxurious dresses in deep shades of purple and magenta race the pulse more than anything particular in the plot or characterization. It’s all quite well done, if only a touch too decorous.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Screenwriters Andy Paterson and Frank Cottrell Boyce (who wrote many of Michael Winterbottom’s early films) adeptly shift the action back and forth between these two timelines, and the drama – exterior and interior – is engrossing in both tracks.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Director Roger Michell and his frequent writer Hanif Kureishi (their last film together was Venus) regularly dance to the very cliff’s edge of despair, and only for the grace of good casting do you not wish they’d just jump and get it over with.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Subtle it ain’t, but there’s an undercurrent of palpable rage that pokes through the (very funny) banter-banter gloss of the thing, and the actors rip into it with relish.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Marshmallow nation, you may now exhale: Rob Thomas did ya right.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Director Lenny Abrahamson establishes a twee tone early that renders tinny the transition into melancholy, and it’s a shame the film so clings to Jon’s perspective. The takeaway is as flat as Frank’s mask. Bemused smile, followed by deflated feeling.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Teenage is an art film – an engrossing one at that – so it isn’t required to respect Queensberry rules vis-à-vis documentaries.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The Hundred-Foot Journey is elevated comfort food. The flavors aren’t complex, but it’s nourishing nonetheless.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Once a crucial piece of backstory is revealed, the picture becomes more rewarding for it, emotionally and aesthetically, but that doesn’t temper the feeling that half the film was wasted on arty misdirection.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Brothers is too depthless to dredge up any tears.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    “Caution: Contents may induce brain bleed.” That is, if you think too hard on the logic and mechanics of its time-travel conceit.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    A romantic comedy, too, but this time the romance is between two women, and one of them, truth be told, is a dud.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    This latest offering continues a trend toward increasingly mature moviemaking from the actor/writer/director.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Fletcher demonstrates, as with her second film, "27 Dresses," that she can put together a funny, able romantic comedy that is a cut above, but no more. Still, those leads are awfully likable, the Massachusetts-for-Alaska landscape rather picturesque, and if The Proposal doesn't reinvent the wheel, merrily we roll along nonetheless.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Gilroy zings the film with tantalizing bits of absurdity (one wonders, wistfully, what the Coen brothers would have done with this material), but too often he returns to his darker, more ponderous instincts.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Anyone who watched (and probably wept his or her way through) the swoony 2004 melodrama "The Notebook" knows Cassavetes is not a man to leave a spot of sap untapped, and in My Sister's Keeper, he pulls out a very big drill indeed.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Sugar is a curiosity – too somber for a picaresque, too arm's-length for much emotional effect – and while it's interesting, it's never truly absorbing.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The movie can be funny in fits, but too often the scripters go for the obvious and uninspired.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Uneven, ineffective mash-up of sex comedy and artillery-heavy action.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Terrio's technically proficient film is mature, modern, and minus the all-important passion and risk.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It's unclear if Van Sant intends to inspire guilt; here, as elsewhere, he is exasperatingly abstruse. And in this striving to not say too much, he ends up not saying much of anything at all.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It's a Big Idea movie that comes out only half-baked.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The film never recovers its initial fizzy-pop charms, owing largely to pacing that turns positively molasses-slow in the second act.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Never thrills on an emotional level the way the best of sports films – a "Hoosiers," say – can, but it's a satisfying entertainment nonetheless.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    This Native American romantic comedy, which won the Audience Award at the 2001 Austin Film Festival, arrives in theatres four years late but seasonally right on time.