Kimberley Jones
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For 692 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 The Grand Budapest Hotel
Lowest review score: 0 Stealing Harvard
Score distribution:
692 movie reviews
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It’s all supremely silly stuff, and amusingly so, as long as you don’t stop to think about all those blameless officers and agents cut down in the line of mindless entertainment.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Sparks, an acting novice, falters when her character must muster gumption or sexual heat. She saves her best for last in a barnburner singing performance, but it's too little, too late – especially with the memory of Houston's one song – a heart-stopping gospel number – still ringing in the ears.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The very best animation can excite the senses and inflame the imagination. But Chico & Rito's charmless line drawings just made me wish the film was live-action instead.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    This is Jackman’s show entirely, and he’s as forceful and charismatic as ever as the walking, talking hurt that is Wolverine. If only he had something more interesting to do here.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Imagine "Little Miss Sunshine's" dark materials (and superior craftsmanship) diluted with a Hannah Montana-like sunny silliness – which is to say: sometimes funny, often broad-stroked, ever sweet, and landing shy of its potential.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The film holds its twists too close to the chest, and there's little to chew on till the ambitiousness of its plotting is revealed late in the film.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    What's translated to film feels like a rough draft, with bullet points at beginning and end, demarcating Lola lost, Lola found. And in the middle? A vast, vague maw.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    This is in fact the end – it is what is. We’ve had some good laughs. Let’s part amicably.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Frozen can count in its favor visual grandeur, two energetic young women as co-leads, and a couple of plot twists that place the film a cut above your average princess fare.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Lucas and Moore aren’t savvy enough, or brave enough, to truly plumb the gallows humor embedded in their premise.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It's unclear where the buck stops in terms of creative authority – at one point, Clayman complains that "the only thing I feel in control of is the money" – which renders OC87 at once a remarkable achievement, and a fatally compromised film.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Chbosky surrounds his hurting characters with the cinematic equivalent of a hug circle – which is sweet, but rather antithetical to tension-building.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The Secret Life of Walter Mitty is a very pretty production – pretty colors, pretty scenery, pretty bromides – and a busy one, too, which helps distract us from the sad fact that the movie is generous and humane but not all that interesting.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Frustrations abound with this limited film, but Wild Horse, Wild Ride does one thing exceptionally well, and that is convey the emotional bond between trainer and horse.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The movie lumbers on some more, reiterating the obvious and relying on overfamiliar imagery. Audiences have a long year to wait for Part 2. Would it not have been better to leave them breathless than heaving a sigh?
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Once the film gets cooking, the questions never stop. For instance: When you find the dead body of someone you love, isn’t your first call to the cops?
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Product placement aside, there’s an admirable, even sweet, message about fellowship and misfit pride shot through the whole script, and Vaughn is rather touching as a kind of cuddly uncle figure to his fellow interns.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The bestselling first book in yet another dystopic Young Adult series, Veronica Roth’s Divergent is engrossing enough to devour overnight, and flimsy enough to forget by morning light. Neil Burger’s film adaptation faithfully reproduces the same effect.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    There are no hard answers in Room 237, a feature-length, sporadically engaging exploration of the latter (The Shining).
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    I suspect a second viewing would uncover more information embedded in the mise-en-scène; had Trance – tonally a jumble and disorienting to the point of distraction – rewarded the audience with the pure perfection of a Keyser Söze-like reveal, I’d be more inclined to make the return trip.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Little girls will love it. I used to be a little girl once, too. I didn’t care much for the Top 40 glossy coat slathered over every song, but this heart will never harden to a spunky kid who’s certain the sun’ll come out tomorrow.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Wright is terrific – sensitive and alert – in the live-action opening. But that opening runs more than 45 minutes long, a way too heavy-handed preamble to the crazed animation to come, and the actress’ vocal delivery – soft-spoken, gently bewildered – is too soporific to pull off lines like, “Look at me, I’m your prophet of doom.”
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Occasional animated inserts inspired by Chantry’s work as an illustrator, while accomplished, inject an off-note of whimsy that doesn’t quite square with the script’s stabs at edgier humor.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Isaac and Olsen are both mesmerizing actors, and Lange and Felton also do very good work in supporting roles, but their collective gameness – all that acting their pants off (sometimes literally) – is underserved by the film’s script and direction.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It’s worth a watch to see these two reliably comic actors do some heavy dramatic lifting and tenderly spot for each other.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Short to short, it’s a Russian roulette.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Most devastating to the film’s effectiveness is its inability to convey that one essential to the story of Amelia Earhart: the tangible pleasures of flying.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Everything that was sharp in the original text has been rounded and buffed.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    I’m all for ambiguity, but Dear Frankie’s multiple dangling threads indicate incoherent storytelling, not profundity.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    As is, it's simply too much information crammed too haphazardly into a running time that at times borders on interminable.

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