For 1,219 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 67% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 11.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kyle Smith's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 48
Highest review score: 100 Venus
Lowest review score: 0 Constellation
Score distribution:
1,219 movie reviews
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    A reasonably uplifting kids movie if you don't think about it too much. I get paid to think about things too much, and effective as the movie is, it nevertheless left me slightly put off.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    That's My Boy is pretty raunchy, and by "pretty," I mean "amazingly," as in Howard Stern- or Seth MacFarlane-style gags.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    This digitally tricked-out fairy tale makes for a reasonably engaging kids’ fantasy, but at best we’re talking about a junior varsity “Lord of the Rings.” It’s March. What did you expect?
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Visually dazzling, intermittently funny.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Fly Away is more situation than story, though, and the Germann character's welcoming, almost saintly vibe doesn't fit.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Even when scary, Murray is somehow funny, too, and he steals the show as always.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    The film's attempt at a sort of beautiful anguish works best in its middle section. It takes far too long to get going, and it doesn't have much of an ending.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Willis is at his relaxed best this time.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    A snarly Euro-thriller with crust under its fingernails and bad breath. It doesn't care if you like it, which is why I kind of do.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    This jagged blob of a movie features a solo dance in the 1930s scored to the Sex Pistols' "Pretty Vacant," several scenes of a rich Manhattan woman chatting with the ghost of Wallis Simpson and a Sotheby's auction that draws a crowd reaction of the kind associated with "Family Feud." Yet I found the movie fascinating. Except for the boring bits.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    It isn't every day that one witnesses, via a camera mounted with the driver, some of the final images in a man's life before he crashes into a wall at enormous speed. Whether you'll feel good about yourself after watching is up to you.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    For a 90-minute movie, Margaret has a thin story. So it's unfortunate that it runs 2 1/2 hours.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    It's a shame that, after nearly 40 years of writing about rock, Cameron Crowe is receptive to the clichés of the genre.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    An appropriately respectful and dignified biopic.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    This strange and eerie noir is more a collection of knockout scenes than a fully realized story.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    In To Rome With Love, Allen approaches the leitmotif in a strange, oblique and interesting way. I fear, though, that the Italian entry in his "Let's Go: Grab Some Euro-Film Subsidies" period will be remembered as being forgettable.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Baseball movies tend to be lyrical, deeply felt, aggressively metaphorical and (consequently) terrible, but Trouble With the Curve has something most others lack: Eastwood's superb, cruel sense of humor, which reaches all the way back to "Every Which Way But Loose."
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    It has a pleasing smallness -- it's cinematic chamber music -- that almost makes you overlook its inability to really explain its subject.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Fascinating though it is, the movie is thin on historical materials.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Soulfully directed by Michael Cuesta ("L.I.E."), Roadie is short on narrative momentum, but it's a perfectly attuned character study of this rock relic and his middle-aged sorrows.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    I liked that The Wolverine (which saves a nifty twist for a surprise scene in the middle of the end credits) turns down the volume on the usual din of colliding mutant superpowers.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Any prison-break yarn that includes Arnold Schwarzenegger delivering the line “You hit like a vegetarian” is OK by me.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Gritty visuals and a strong central performance elevate the routine crime story at the heart of Sweden's Easy Money, a sort of mash-up of "Goodfellas" and "The Great Gatsby."
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    As a French Resistance thriller, Free Men is so-so, but it is driven by a mischievously interesting idea: that Muslims and Jews have more in common than they normally allow.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Funny and promising as the first act is, the entire second act is pretty awful, as the script chucks in one tiresome, unlikely gag after another.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    In the end (which continues into the credits), I was left thinking McDonagh can do better than this, and yet I was slightly more agog with admiration than peevish with frustration. Most of all, I wanted to see the film again.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Green rules the picture with her nutty stare and her willingness to get nasty in a hot sex scene, but the movie’s main weak point is the Greek general Themistokles.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    If you can overlook Andie MacDowell's Mitteleuropa accent as a Jewish Holocaust survivor (I know: big if), the cinematic roman a clef Mighty Fine has some quiet charms.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Familiar elements such as a dark family secret, a ghost and a Ouija board start to seem trite after a while, and the third act is a little ridiculous, but debut writer-director Nicholas McCarthy does a lot with a little and seems fully prepared to handle a big-studio horror project.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Initially, this low-budget film writes a lot of checks on the First National Bank of Whimsy, but I was astonished when none of them bounced.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    It turns out that constraint is really what the show is all about, or to put it another way, I'm disappointed that they turned my horny-teen comedy into a gross-out comedy.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Like Provence itself, Auteuil is in no hurry to get anywhere, reveling instead in the southern region's brilliant light and whispering crickets. His tangy accent and evident fondness for his character make the picture enjoyable enough as it plods along, and the final act wraps things up on a fulfilling note.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    I do get a chuckle out of movies with wildly inappropriate behavior, rude language and ultramayhem, especially when they involve children, but Kick-Ass 2 sometimes felt like being trapped in a room with the funniest guy in seventh grade.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    First-time writer-director Andy Muschietti, an Argentine discovered by Guillermo del Toro, relies too much, especially in the early going, on horror clichés (sudden loud noises and jagged blasts of music), but he does make the tension hum.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    France's friendship dramedy Little White Lies is such a blatant rip-off of a far better American movie that it could have been called "Le Big Chill."
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Frears has a lot of fun with the bad tempers and high spirits of this crew of adrenaline junkies, and though the story falls a little flat, the script is sprinkled with dry wit.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Rio 2 is not what I would call Amazon prime, but it’s got enough silly songs and daffy critters to keep the little ones happy.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    It’s adequately visionary, it’s routinely spectacular, it breathes fire and yet somehow feels room-temperature.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Picture "Raging Bull" with a sleazy prep from the Brooklyn hipsteropolis of Williamsburg, and you'll get the idea of The Comedy, a character study that tries to make the revolting compelling.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    This is one of those nature documentaries that’s pretty much solely interested in being entertaining, and so is cleverly edited to look like the linear story of a mother (dubbed Sky) and her newborns (Scout and Amber).
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Carlyle gives a quietly engaging performance as a Golden State farmworker with a secret in the likable indie California Solo.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    This is grim, bleak material that at times is monotonous, but its woe feels authentic.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Tina Fey is adorable as a gulag guard who yearns to sing, but even better is Ty Burrell as a Clouseau-like Interpol inspector.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    In the House promises to be a social satire with a flash of Hitchcockian menace, but gradually it turns into a routine thumb-sucker on reality versus fiction.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Soulful though the film is, melodrama gradually sneaks in, and then it takes over.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    The film, then, places a heavy hand on the scales of justice as it winds up with a fuzzy plea — an implied demand for a second, federal civil rights trial for the cop, who got a light sentence. But the shooting wasn’t a racist one.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Provides a different take on its subject than many of us are accustomed to: Nelson Mandela is no Martin Luther King Jr., and he was far more radical than even Malcolm X. If you’re under the impression that his ideas got him imprisoned for 25 years, think again: It was his bombs.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    The movie jogs along nicely without ever getting a case of the stupids; far from being a bloated “John Carter,” it’s just a pared-down yarn of survival: “Die Hard” on a planet.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    What begins as an alert and witty barbed satire degenerates into a senseless bloodbath in the black comedy Sightseers.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    An uneasy mix of Richard Linklater and Abbott and Costello, Prince Avalanche is an oddment, but one that brings some small, peculiar pleasures.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    You may protest that this is just a splattery feature-length sketch, and you’d be absolutely right. Why not have a laugh at this absurdly trite concept? I’ll take the cheesy breeziness of “CVZ” over the frowny somberness of “World War Z” any day.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Phoenix, who was so subtle in “Her” and brilliantly tortured in “The Master,” has lapsed back into the shouty bombast style of his “Gladiator” days, but his efforts to make the character seem layered are to little avail, especially given that Gray waits until the end to try to make him a tragic figure instead of merely a sleazy one.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Mostly a routine love story elevated by one of the year’s most magnetic performances.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    All of this is secondary, even tertiary material, even if much of it is interesting and even wrenching to behold.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    The second half, though, is chilling, as the trio’s actions come into sharp, painful focus. Too bad Reichardt has no ending.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Morris is likely to disappoint liberals in The Unknown Known by failing to take down an apparently weak target.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    An honorable, sober but completely unnecessary take on the Dickens novel, Great Expectations serves as a fine introduction to the story but won’t excite those familiar with previous versions.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    A disarming but low-impact documentary that amounts to an odd dual biopic, Shepard & Dark can feel a bit like intruding on a conversation between two old friends.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Cédric Klapisch’s film is meandering and cutesy, but his characters are endearing and every so often he comes up with a deft insight, such as how this city’s streets are like a flayed zombie.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    An intriguingly Hitchcockian premise gradually takes on a preposterous air in the art-world noir The Best Offer.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Long on atmosphere and less sentimental about poverty than “Beasts of the Southern Wild,” the film carries a potent charge of authenticity.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    It’s photographically yummy, heaving with sun-dappled vistas and four-star dining. The boys float around a bit in the sea and enjoy homemade pasta while trundling out their impressions of, say, Marlon Brando.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    The gorgeous heartache of songs by the group Belle and Sebastian gives God Help the Girl its dreamy appeal, but thanks to a poky story line it essentially amounts to a series of music videos.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Turing’s tale needs to be more widely known, and while The Imitation Game may not be a great film, it is an important one.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    A sun-splashed noir that loses its appeal in the last act.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    This one-sided documentary, told entirely by supporters, paints Swartz as a hero pursued by malign forces.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    In Listen Up Philip, the tiny fury of Jason Schwartzman suggests his “Rushmore” character is now 15 years older and a middling Brooklyn novelist. His deadpan misanthropy is good for some acerbic laughs in a movie that starts appealingly but gradually comes to seem closed and stuck.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    A clever setup that harkens back to “You’ve Got Mail” and “The Shop Around the Corner” doesn’t quite pay off in India’s warm-hearted comedy-drama The Lunchbox.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    This is a useful primer on what went wrong — and right — in 2008.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Shailene Woodley, already a subtle and rangy actress, easily carries the film as Hazel.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Not many surprises are in store, but the film’s affection for the dramatist is pleasing.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Rookie filmmaker Michael Maren’s script isn’t deep, but it’s heartfelt without being sticky, suggesting that the best way to deal with aging parents is to savor every tender frustration while you can.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Though far too long for its wisp of a plot, this stylish film has a nerve-cinching grip that makes it more alarming than most horror flicks, let alone most movies about a couple having a tiff.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Annabelle is mostly a grab into the Great Big Bag O’ Horror Clichés: sound-bombs of shrieking violins explode randomly, doors slam unbidden, rocking chairs creak by themselves, machines suddenly whir to life.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    The film’s mix of elements of “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation” and “Bad Santa” is amusing.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    If Top Five doesn’t go deep, though, it is intermittently very funny.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    Doesn't offer plot or an inquiry into the evil in men's hearts. It simply wallows in the filth and inhumanity that surround a father and his pre-adolescent son as they march across the shattered remains of this country.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    The movie falls into the same uneasy category as "Eight Legged Freaks": too tongue-in-cheek to be thrilling, not funny enough to be a comedy.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    Among cutesy pop musical trios aimed at nondiscerning audiences, I'll take Alvin and Co. over the Jonas Brothers any day.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    Turns out to be a dour, shouty atheist manifesto. With a change of scenery it could have been called "Godless in Seattle."
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    It's the Food Network meets The Weather Channel meets . . . the Scary Doomsday Preachers Channel.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    Having seen the trailer for Brothers and now the finished film, I feel as though I just watched the trailer twice.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    Even for a French drama, Summer Hours is so slow as to be practically still.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    Drag Me to Hell is pure cheese. Goat cheese.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    The Fourth Kind has a clever gimmick and nothing more.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    Edward's a remarkable young gentleman when you consider the hell he's been through: It turns out he's always 17, his fate to keep repeating high school, forever and ever. If that's my only option, kindly burn me at the stake.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    The strange thing about the movie is its idea that such couples are rare flowers. But you can scarcely take a step in Seattle or San Francisco or Los Feliz without meeting them in hordes.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    Watching this movie is like listening to Michael Jackson tell you what real men are like.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    300
    Sensory gluttony is reason enough to see a movie, and few epics overstuff the eyes like this one.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    The movie is a gentle British ensemble comedy much like "Four Weddings and a Funeral" - minus the four weddings and four-fifths of the wit.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    Everyone's Hero, a tame CGI cartoon for the simple-minded: the very young, the very old and Yankee fans.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    Some movies present their whole story in a two-minute trailer, but Gridiron Gang says it all in its poster.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    A buffet of dumb and degrading stunts halfway between Looney Tunes and Abu Ghraib?
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    To kill 80 minutes, the movie has to pad itself with several dull speeches and stagy moments. The worst? How about when the five men, who have ample reason to fear each other and are facing a life-or-death reckoning, whistle "Ode to Joy" together like a bunch of Whiffenpoofs?
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    The minimalist style keeps the suspense warm. The movie is unusual among teen horror flicks in that it largely avoids the usual cheap thrills and bursts of scare music. Instead, it carefully repeats isolated images and sound bites until they take on a shivery power.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    As the movie's feet get stuck in its own misery, it made me appreciate "Trainspotting" all over again - its wit, how it moved, the way any outcome for its characters seemed possible.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    Has the kind of soulful subject matter that will strike some as profoundly emotional, but it gets a flag for roughing the tear ducts. This isn't football - it's cornball.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    As DJ, Columbus Short eases his way through the movie without trying to impress us too much, which is welcome, but he's also a little bland around the edges.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    The Hitcher is the Jessica Simpson of psycho killer flicks - cheerfully in touch with its own brainlessness.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    Dividing its loyalties between documentary and fictional narrative, it lacks the advantages of belonging to either side.

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