For 1,250 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Liam Lacey's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Pan's Labyrinth
Lowest review score: 0 Batman & Robin
Score distribution:
1,250 movie reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    If the word masterpiece has any use these days, it must apply to the film Once Upon a Time in Anatolia, a mature, philosophically resonant work from Turkey's leading director, 53-year-old Nuri Bilge Ceylan (Climates, Distance, Three Monkeys).
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Shot in Louisiana, with non-professional actors and apparently set-designed from a junkyard, Beasts of the Southern Wild marks one of the most auspicious American directorial debuts in years.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Like Stanley Kubrick's "Eyes Wide Shut," Anderson's latest is enigmatic. But if you have eyes and can see, The Master it is unmistakably some kind of wonder. At least, it's an exhilarating demonstration of big-screen moviemaking in dreamlike colours and a sense-heightening 70-mm format.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    As with his previous film, director Chang nurses a compelling drama from a multilayered cultural reality, at once intimate and unfathomably large in implications.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    No
    Take the backroom political machinations of "Lincoln," add in the showbiz sleight of hand of "Argo," and you’ll get something like No, a cunning and richly enjoyable combination of high-stakes drama and media satire.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    What keeps the energy percolating is DiCaprio’s performance, in the loosest and most charismatic turn of his career.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Mostly, Nebraska impresses for its sure rhythms and artful balance of comedy and melancholy, resulting in Payne’s most satisfying film since "About Schmidt."
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Linklater’s film is very much its own hybrid creature. While the dramatic scaffolding is lightly drawn, it becomes apparent that Linklater has organized his material along certain themes, most notably that of the passage of time and the dream life of childhood.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Their excitement is infectious and the entire endeavour both mind-bending and tremendously human: Near the end, Peter Higgs, the recent Nobel Prize-winner and one of the scientists who first predicted the particle back in 1964, is seen in Switzerland watching the data results come in, while a tear trickles down his cheek.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    The documentary of the year may also be its most hair-raising thriller.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Relentlessly dark but expertly rendered, it shares its cinematographer and quality of aggrieved compassion with another recent Romanian art house hit, "The Death of Mr. Lazarescu."
    • 92 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    That's not to say that There Will Be Blood isn't something exceptional; it's just that the movie is jarringly erratic, ranging from moments of delicacy to majesty to over-the-top bombast.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    A French rat as a master chef? Absurd. But a brilliant French chef with an American accent? C'est grotesque!
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    A film rich in paradoxes. Much of the film's style is dreamy, from the snow-covered Ontario landscapes suggestive of a blanket of forgetfulness, to Julie Christie's pale, intoxicating beauty, to the ambient musical score.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Both the most bewildering of the three movies and also the most brutally compelling.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    The first 20 minutes of the South Korean film The Host represents one of the most entertaining movie openings in memory. It's the same kind of pop-culture thrill provided by Steven Spielberg's "Jaws," with the same sense of astonishment, fear and pleasure at something genuinely new.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Yes
    Ultimately, Potter's fable is about how a catastrophe forces us to ask what we believe and why.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    A movie that gets wonderfully under your skin.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Compelling, disturbing.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Ghoulishness and innocence walk hand-in-hand in Tim Burton's Corpse Bride, a movie that digs into Hollywood's past to resurrect the antique art of stop-motion animation and create a fabulous bauble of a movie.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    The feeling is like a warm homecoming.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Death, torture, humour and even budding eroticism -- now this is more like it.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Can a little-read 18th-century literary masterpiece be food-spittingly funny? Can it also include contemporary English actors riffing about their bad teeth, getting drunk and kissing their personal assistants? The answer is yes, as long as you agree that the best way to adapt an original book is with a correspondingly original film.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Sensual and scary, the movie is so visually textured you feel as though you're brushing against the screen.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Iraq in Fragments already stands up as a classic war documentary, in its unusual poetic form and by its extraordinary access to the lives of ordinary Iraqis.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Though Burton's version is faithful, the filter of his sensibility has turned it into another of his necrophilic creepshows.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Much of what happens in Silent Light can feel painstakingly mundane: milking cows, harvesting wheat, a long drive at night in and out of shadows. Yet throughout, there's a sense of something ominous impending, and while it remains gentle, the ending is genuinely startling.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Hackman is unexpectedly hilarious. With protruding top teeth and a professorial beard, he's a motormouth, badgering and abusing one minute, wheedling and fawning the next.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    May not have the most sophisticated narrative, but it is one of the most spectacular and masterly demonstrations of animation in screen history.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Giddily impudent in its execution, pummelling in its message, To Die For is finally a comedy black enough for the tabloid television age.

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