For 1,292 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Liam Lacey's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Happy-Go-Lucky
Lowest review score: 0 Dumb and Dumberer: When Harry Met Lloyd
Score distribution:
1,292 movie reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    All of the story is so absurdly humourless that it is dramatically inert, as if Nolan had decided the only way to make the Batman character more substantial was to put weights on his wings.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Strictly a middle-aged comedy, which consists of more easy lobs than sharp smacks, but manages to get the job done.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Even at three hours, the film feels truncated, which raises the question of whether the entire adaptation exercise might have chosen the wrong form. Stretched out to 10 or 12 hours on cable television, Cloud Atlas, the series, would be the talk of the fall television season, and the stories, rather than the thematic scaffolding, would be the right focus of attention.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The film sustains some suspense and brooding atmosphere for its first half, but eventually the clichés of character and dialogue drag it struggling to ground.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    As the careening cars go splat, splat, splat, the director's vision of the future looks like a cheerfully mindless combination of two extremes of carnival entertainment: demolition derby and whack-a-mole.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    This is Austen as chick-lit, not too deep, but with some integrity and the worthy goal of reaching a younger audience by offering a starch-free version of the story.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The problem with Signs is not that the movie is pretentious -- or ambitious -- enough to try to combine "The Book of Job" and "Invasion of the Body Snatchers." The problem is that Signs manages to be both so terribly serious and so unimportant at the same time.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    If Pee-Wee wasn't the most engaging physical comedian since Dick Van Dyke, it would be disastrous. As it is, the opening works well enough to have viewers completely hooked by the time he sets out on the road, like Huck Finn, with his clothes wrapped up in a handerchief on a stick. [10 Aug 1985, p.E9]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The problem is that Chicken Little settles for what's expedient and safe and, over all, lives down to its title.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Essentially an affectionate and personal project to honour Thompson's memory, The Rum Diary occasionally strains to evoke the journalist's surreal black humour.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Filmmaker Evan Jackson Leong, who began following Lin when he played for Harvard, also emphasizes the importance of Lin’s tight bonds with his family and the importance of his evangelical Christianity (“I only play for God,” Lin says).
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Jurassic World never breaks out of its own confines of homage and imitation. The movie ends up as an awkward, ungainly hybrid: large, but inconsequential.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Bring on the sequel please, because, as fine as Denzel is, director Antoine Fuqua’s The Equalizer is not so good – a self-consciously stylized, stop-and-start hodgepodge of Death Wish street vengeance, Bond-style Russian villainy, and moodily shot Boston locale.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Fitfully daring, Pumpkin isn't quite sure what it's about -- the tone bounces between thudding satire and toothless camp parody -- but it's definitely a bad-mannered child of our times.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    If the external threat in the plot were a little more credible, this would be an annoying distraction. But in the context of the rest of Gloria, it's a safe strategy: When not watching Sharon Stone act, audiences can fall back on just watching Sharon Stone.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The important things first: It's always a relief to come out of an Adam Sandler movie without a case of hives, and you can comfortably attend Anger Management without prophylactic antihistamines.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Well-intentioned but emotionally straitjacketed.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The problem with Flash of Genius is that a windshield wiper is an awfully thin mechanism on which to hang a feature movie.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Apart from Mychael Danna’s portentous orchestral and electronic score, Transcendence simply lacks oomph: Shots don’t overwhelm, scenes don’t pop and nothing on the screen gets under your skin.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    As a story about a war that is unresolved, it seems better suited to a provisional “To be continued” than the certainty of “The end.”
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Some of the most striking moments in Bears are during the film’s closing credits, when we see how alarmingly close the camera crew was to the animals. We’re reminded us that while the movie Bears is both sweet and humane, the real bears are neither.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Since there's no evidence in the film that Green teaches his students how to compose, improvise or experiment with the music, presumably the next wave will come from somewhere else.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Sumptuous and schmaltzy, Steven Spielberg's First World War drama, War Horse, is a strange beast of a film.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    By the head-scratching dénouement, the "perfect" in the title seems particularly misplaced. How about Dial M for Muddle.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Does not disappoint expectations: This is not a case of dumbing down literature; it's mediocrity aimed for and successfully achieved.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Almost a comedy, though not an entirely successful one: It's too acerbic to be funny and too detached to be really moving.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Hathaway may be in a royal rut, but the tiara seems to fit.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    You'll laugh, though you might hate yourself in the morning.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Some of the later scenes capture the spirit of majestic sweetness of "Close Encouners of the Third Kind" and "E.T: The Extra-Terrestrial" period, but the elevated moments don't last. They're relentlessly undermined by the f-bombs, groin kicks, and anal-probing jokes.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Like a lot of well-staged parties, though, the affair peaks shortly after the introductions, and then devolves into intrigues, fights and mayhem.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    A typical mixture of the artful and the repellent.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The director veers off course and heads straight for mediocrity. It's a disappointing ride.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Musically, it's a mixed bag -- The concert remains more of an historical curiosity than a must-see rock film.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The problem is, the last section of the movie doesn't follow the career path of Greene: It traces the blander character of Hughes. Cheadle, who galvanizes the first half of the film, fades from view, and the best part of the conversation in Talk to Me goes with him.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Not super, but not bad, the teen comedy, Superbad, is another comic dance across the hormonal minefield of late high school.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The combination of DiCaprio's soulful, self-effacing work in Scorsese's "The Departed," and this unexpectedly complex portrait in a simple-minded movie, make it the best year of his career since the big boat crash of 1997.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The problems with Damon's character are the problem with the movie: It's about plot mechanics, not heart and soul.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    No political tract, but it can be surprisingly bold.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    A beautifully shot, well-acted, and worthy-to-a-fault Second World War survivor story that only intermittently achieves the kind of emotional impact for which it aims.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Whatever the narrative shortcomings, these characters have the warmth of antique painted storybooks, unlike the eerie plastic simulation of Pixar characters.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The Corruptor is visually lively and filled with gratuitous destruction. [12 Mar 1999]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    With more superheroes, more action and more stuff blowing up than ever before, X-Men: The Last Stand has the climactic oomph that suggests a finale, though not the gravitas to suggest a resolution.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    A beautifully shot, modest little fable about the misunderstandings between people.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Slick and slight.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Roughly-made but illuminating, the Iraq documentary In My Mother's Arms is a brief immersion into life in a Baghdad boys' orphanage.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    After its promising opening, I Am Legend devolves into a generic zombie slaughterfest.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    So blatantly contrived it could be called The Fast and the Spurious, Crank has the small saving grace of being intentionally ridiculous. The action sequences are more notable for their outrageousness than their visceral power.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    For all its treacly excesses of the post- "Full Monty" era, British comedy hasn't entirely lost its teeth yet.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Parents of young children should be warned: Here's a family-values film that won't be much fun for the whole family.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Excellent in flashes, unintentionally absurd and lead-footed at other moments, the movie stumbles under the weight of its own grandiose intentions.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    There are too many moments in Ice Age when you find yourself thinking: less bonding and fewer anti-Darwinian life-lessons please; more of that anarchist Scrat.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The movie manages a couple of popcorn-spitting-funny jokes for each biographical decade the film covers, though typically it's no better than moderately clever.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Never comes together as a persuasive whole. Instead of moral complexity, we get an overfamiliar pursuit tale and investigation story. Worse, the movie fails the first test of a thriller: It lacks any significant suspense.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Fittingly, it’s finally a film about transience and continuity.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    What becomes increasingly apparent is that Gordon-Levitt hasn’t exactly decided what Jon’s problem is, in a character that seems partly an expression of male wish fulfilment.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The best one can say is that it's a smart cartoon, and a fairly exhausting viewing experience.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    When the larger question cannot be answered, the lesser one -- "What would you have done?" -- seems beside the point.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The most unexpected thing about the Lebanese film Caramel is its predictability.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    So long as you grit your teeth and keep your eyes on the screen, it’s an enjoyable, if almost academic, exercise in bad taste.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    One distraction is that everything feels smothered in an extra helping of déjà vu sauce: another movie featuring a middle-aged misanthrope with a dewy younger woman; another film with stage magic as a theme.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Mixes broad slapstick and off-hand one-liners in a sometimes surprisingly funny mixture.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Not exactly a movie in the usual sense, not exactly a ride, Journey is more of a virtual theme-park simulation and possibly a milestone of immersive entertainment.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The movie's last two minutes, in which they all do goofy dances and have no dialogue or script to get in their way, is easily the highlight. It's the previous 113 minutes of plot that cause problems.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    While both the scenery and star Diane Lane are highly watchable, the movie is pure froth, a plate-sized helping of zabaglione.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The mainstream prominence of pornography gets a shove forward with the teen comedy, The Girl Next Door, an improbably-not-terrible teen sex comedy.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Lucy, you may have twigged, is named after our 3.2-million-year-old hominid ancestor.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    There are flashes of excitement in this film, mostly from the verbal play and sulphurous humour of Welsh's perspective, but there's a lot that makes you wonder why you're sitting through it.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Like any good religious sermon, it follows its scary vision of hell with a possibility of last-minute redemption.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    If the movie is essentially a study of a loving family, A Soldier's Daughter Never Cries is hampered by extraneous scenes that are simply self-indulgent on the director's part.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    It's no great thing, just a better Thing than expected.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Human Nature's zigzag ingenuity wears out some time before the farce bounces slowly to an uneven conclusion. For all its highfalutin title and corkscrew narrative, the movie turns out to be not much more than a shaggy human tale.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    An overqualified cast (including Vincent D’Onofrio and an uncredited Nick Nolte) brings more gravity than required to repeated “this is me staring you down” confrontations.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Jacobs is a competent director but he doesn't bring anything extra to this shell game of a narrative.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Invincible lacks Herzog's usual visual and intellectual panache, and is afflicted by weak English-language acting, which makes it more of a career curio than a major work.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The real question for audiences isn’t whether Tony Stark/Iron Man defeats the latest supervillain (of course he does), but whether the movie itself rises above the dreaded third-in-a-sequel torpor of "Spider-Man" and "The Dark Knight." Spoiler alert: Yes, mostly, it does.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    With all due respect to Japanese animation fans and pop-culture enthusiasts, life may be just too short to plunge into the busy world of Cowboy Bebop.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The film is visually bland, with only a couple of bookending outdoor sequences around a handful of interior sets.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    If Ocean's Thirteen were compared to a gem, it would have to be considered something of a flashy fraud: Initially impressive for cut and colour, it lacks either clarity or weight.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Estela Bravo's film Fidel, The Untold Story has the kitsch appeal of a farm implement on a restaurant wall, or an Andy Warhol Mao poster: Interesting, but not for its original purpose.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Here's a vote of gratitude for Samuel L. Jackson, who has become a specialist in making mediocre movies far more entertaining than they should be.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Focus, which was co-written and directed by "Crazy Stupid Love" creators, Glen Ficarra and John Requa, is drunk on its perfume-ad cinematography and doesn’t know when to quit with its double-double cross plotting.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    A resonant journalistic cautionary tale gets packaged as a hokey thriller in Kill the Messenger, a movie with a message that isn’t nearly as urgent as it needs to be.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Shot mostly at night, in high-contrast images, punctuated by rock-video collages, Intacto is nothing if not hip, but its questions are more coffee-shop hypothetical than genuinely profound.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Critic-proof, devoid of plot or acting, and quick to mock anyone who might make something of it.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Once again, perhaps the most impressive effect is Patrick Stewart as Captain Picard, using his Shakespearean training to make long mouthfuls of nonsense sound almost persuasive.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Too silly to be taken seriously, it's not silly enough to overcome skepticism.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Price has written a screenplay that may be complex and ambitious to a fault.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Sciamma (Water Lilies, Tomboy) gets unaffected performances from her non-professional cast.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    A trite but sturdy offering, a showcase for popular young Czech actress Anna Geislerova, as well as the beautiful Moravian countryside, shot in glowing earthy tones.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    He [Salles] has managed to create a movie that's pretty bleak for a Hollywood -- especially Disney -- thriller. His theme, as a director, is the indignities of poverty and, in his way, he pays more attention to that agenda than he does in generating any real thrills.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Full of falling rain, fluttering silk, John Williams's music and whispery voiceover, Memoirs of a Geisha is one long oxymoronic exercise in attempting to show delicacy through overkill.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The trouble is that the plot is so elliptical to be almost unfollowable (though it helps to have seen the trailer).
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Still Alice is being called a career performance for Moore, and although it may be one of her most poignant roles (it has earned her a fifth Oscar nomination), the part barely scratches the surface of her ability.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    There’s a flicker of déjà vu seeing Max Irons step into the role of a posh Oxford University student in The Riot Club. Irons has inherited the cheekbones and silky voice of his father, Jeremy Irons.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Give Quarantine credit: Without resorting to computer-generated monsters or supernatural explanations, it uses consistent logic and confinement to find new ways of being scary.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Fortunately, director-writer Marc Lawrence (he also created the Hugh Grant-Sandra Bullock comedy "Two Weeks Notice") manages saccharine saturation by tempering his stars' familiar appeal with enough dry wit to make this low-key romantic comedy a not-too-sticky Valentine's Day offering.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Think of it as "Cheers" without the beer, or "Friends'" Central Perk with razors and sharper dialogue.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    May be anticorporate, it's by no means hype-free.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Once again, a first-rate cast helps slightly elevate this sentimental Britcom.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Director Roger Donaldson ("Smash Palace," "No Way Out," "Species"), working from a script by Leslie Bohem ("Daylight"),does a serviceable job, wrapping his narrative around the big kabooms, but the real interest comes from the extraordinary barrage of sound and spectacle.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    A stylish, brutal affair that delivers grim atmosphere and punishing violence but loses impact in telegraphing its political punches.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    [Hoffman] gives gross-out comedy a whole new depth.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Though rich in visual style, the movie is unbalanced in performances and script, ranging, from scene to scene, from go-for-baroque grandeur to strident excess.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The most disturbing aspect of the movie is not the sex scenes (shot from the waist up) but her face, especially in her porn-star persona: a frozen little smiling mask that suggests a paradoxically intense vacancy.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Give it an A for concept -- a bizarre marionette version of a Jerry Bruckheimer-style action movie; B for its occasional moments of convulsively funny comedy; and D for the politics, for pandering to exactly the kind of reactionary sentiments it purports to satirize.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    A movie that feels a bit like digging a hole in the ground -- an exercise that may build character but doesn't seem to accomplish much else.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Apart from the mobile camera and a moderately challenging time-jumping script, this is weepy women's cable-television fare of the tears-and-cuddles variety.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Hoary, rather than whore-y, Irina Palm is shameless only in its mawkish sincerity.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Low, mean and depressingly plausible.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The Human Scale uses plenty of globe-hopping examples to make up for what it sometimes lacks in depth.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    A passable romantic dish, a good-looking, old-fashioned date movie set in an idealized Greenwich Village, evocative of the better Woody Allen films.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Like the Irish film "Once," it’s a drama about the lives of musical performers who sing songs within the film to illustrate the emotional journey of a relationship. Broken Circle, though, is painted in much darker hues.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Given Waller's experience and budget, one might expect he could upgrade the B-movie acting and stock situations. He doesn't. The pay-off comes not in the story or acting, but the camera play and movement.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    All this is more amusing in theory than practice, partly because Leonard’s world of wiseguys and slapstick violence has become so familiar – the caper-movie default mode.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    If the downbeat plot is depressingly familiar, it’s partly salvaged by the quality of the performances.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Touchy Feely seems poised to explore the same issues of embarrassing intimacy Shelton mined in her two last films, Humpday and Your Sister’s Sister. But here there’s a new fantastical element, the kind of magical device that might pop up in a minor Woody Allen film.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Walks a line between didactic allegory and realistic drama.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    As it dips in and out of the boys' lives, and occasionally wanders back to the contemporary Dito surveying the old neighbourhood, Saints never really integrates its two time periods.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Compared to many of last year's documentaries (Pina, Paradise Lost 3: Purgatory, Cave of Forgotten Dreams or The Interrupters), this film is distinctly minor league. But it does provide the thumbs-up emotional lift of a bumper-sticker message on game day.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Tarantino's approach is so enamoured of the exploitation cinema he emulates, there is a serious risk that noble intentions get smothered in juvenile comedy and cinematic grandstanding.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Low on nuance and high on body count, the movie is primarily of interest to fans of Asian action spectacles and followers of the charismatic Chow Yun-fat (Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon), here cast as both a dandyish villain and his idiotic double.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Though far from a disaster of Biblical proportions, Evan Almighty is a mild, sporadically funny comedy in an oversized sentimental frame.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Feels like a missed opportunity to do a country romantic melodrama in grand style.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Exist as extended videos for the accompanying soul and rap soundtrack.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Conventional and erratic in tone as The Eye is, the film has some real visual (and auditory) style going for it.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Hop
    In this Willy Wonka-like animated world where multihued candies move about on assembly lines, the constant introduction to Rube Goldberg-style devices and slapstick action grows increasingly tiresome.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Wilder's created world is alive with his erudition, his sympathy for his characters in their loneliness and flawed goodness. This film doesn't do him justice but it's a gesture in the right direction.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Artistic originality is not so common a commodity that you can afford to get too fussy about the details.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The Summit is a mixture of the inventive and the misguided in its attempt to recreate the circumstances of the August, 2008, disaster on the world’s second-highest mountain, K2, when 11 climbers were killed.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    In a summer of low movie expectations and worse results, Fantastic Four is a not-so-bad mindless bit of camp escapism that doesn't try to eclipse its dime-store comic book roots.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    A film whose limitations are the same as its appeal: It's a bauble. Running at barely more than 80 minutes, the film is both a travelogue and a commercial for swinging polyglot Europe.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Schreiber has one major casting coup in Eugene Hutz, the New York-based Ukrainian/Gypsy/Punk musician who plays Alex.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Braff's deadpan performance and dry reactions are deft, and his ability to shape a scene to a punctuation point is impressive, but he's all over the place as a writer.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Less “amazing” than persistent.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Too busy to be boring or deeply engaging, Tarzan is an efficient Disney treatment of a time-tested story. The results aren't bad, just not quite worth a chest-pounding victory yell.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Irresistibly funny in its brightest moments. At other times, this comedy about a black-white culture clash sags until it scrapes bottom.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The movie is often both smart and creepy, but it's still a novice effort. After an initially engrossing start, it stumbles through a series of implausible coincidences and murky events, barely held together by the magnetic performance of Javier Bardem.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Blade doesn't manage to work up a whole lot of suspense.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Whom is this movie for, really? It's too tame for the whooping crowds of women who made hits of the "Sex and the City" movies and "Bridesmaids." And for sure it isn't for parents with kids. You can probably find them, diaper bags in the aisles and toddlers on their laps, watching "Dr. Seuss: The Lorax."
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A glum meditation on isolation and romantic malaise.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A redemption allegory so poker-faced you might forget that redemption is supposed to be a good thing.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    For all these references to the fairytale, Sydney White soon takes an easier path, recycling familiar "Mean Girls" and "Revenge of the Nerds" scenarios.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    That makes Mockingjay – Part 1 an experience to be endured, like a prison sentence, rather than enjoyed. By all means, bring on the revolution: It has to be more exciting than this.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The story is shockingly ordinary. The movie plays like an extended mediocre episode of the X-Files TV show or, for that matter, even a contemporary crime series such as CSI.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    This Means War is a Valentine's date dud: Think wilted roses, squashed chocolates and flat champagne.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    In the end, Eagle vs. Shark represents a convincing triumph for Dumb.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Promised Land is a low-budget effort, far too awkward and contrived a drama to change many hearts and minds.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Parental Guidance is one of those intergenerational embarrassment comedies in the "Meet the Fockers" line, where children can enjoy seeing grown-ups looking ridiculous.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Leatherhead's a comedy of stock setups and kooky digressions in which nothing really comes to a head, and running at close to two hours, it lacks the essential brevity of the form.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The ninth film in the franchise is competent enough but it won’t freeze the heart or fire the imagination.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Ultimately, Next is just the next Nic Cage vehicle, another quirky story that allows him to do his patented neurotic balancing act in an askew world. The problem here is not just that Cage's shtick is wearing as thin as his hair; the role is a bad fit.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Screenwriter Brian Helgeland (L.A. Confidential, Mystic River) is the real culprit here, creating a crude paint-by-numbers fiction that keeps yelling about the importance of the truth while hurtling in the opposite direction.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    There's potential here for a macabre cult favourite touching on themes of technology and the body-mind split, but the movie's progression into rambling incoherence gives new meaning to the phrase "fatal script error."
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Contraryto its exciting advertising, Event Horizon is not the most frightening movie ever made. If anything, the conventional pop-up scares and gross-out effects of this British haunted-space-ship story seem less terrifying than quaint.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Both original and good; the problem is the original parts aren't good and the good parts aren't original.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The story is a much more serious problem, a run-on, overstuffed narrative that feels like a very long prologue for a climax that never comes.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The goal is apparently a double exercise in heartfelt lessons and deep hilarity, but it's hard to tell because the pace feels so lethargic. Director and screenwriter Wil Shriner is a TV-sitcom veteran (Frasier, Everybody Loves Raymond) whose idea of directing a movie is to make another sitcom, only four times as long.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The fun of Biker Boyz should be in the racing, and though director Reggie Rock Bythewood throws around a lot of techniques, nothing really ignites.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A meditation of life, death, reincarnation and biblical symbolism that feels peculiarly like a head-shop poster, blown up to feature-movie size.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Performances, over all, are a mixed bag; Zeta-Jones does a fair, if incongruous, impersonation of a forties vamp, while Chandler and Pepper do well with limited screen time. As usual, Wright, as a Machiavellian police commissioner, transcends so-so-material to establish himself as the most complex character in the film.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie, which is roughly as predictable as the attraction of flies to dung, is a hackneyed mix of sentimentality and anarchic comedy.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    More entertaining in concept than execution. What starts as geek comedy gradually slides into a familiar morality play about the savagery beneath the veneer of civility.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie is a preholiday trifle that’s mildly risqué and a lot sentimental.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    In the world of pulp movies, where horror, westerns and Asian exploitation borrow and blend with each other, there's a point where the cross-genre mishmash begins to feel like gobbledegook. That's definitely the case with Sukiyaki Western Django.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Where this PG-rated adaptation of a hit Broadway show, adapted by Adam Shankman falls down is by being far too mild for its supposedly outrageous subject.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    There's a scientific law to be discerned here that producers would be well to heed: Mediocre movies start to drag as soon as the action speeds up; when the explosions start, they fall to pieces.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    There’s little here to improve upon the stilted quality of the original, and it’s even more cumbersomely plotted.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Throbbing musical crescendos and flickery flashbacks abound but apart from some outlandish plot machinations, nothing here is good or bad enough to be memorable.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    There are the usual gaggle of embarrassing friends, a lot of voice-over and montages, a wedding, a funeral and wait … something’s missing. Oh, right. Hugh Grant.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Light to the point of disposability, Sweet Home Alabama is a small screwball comic idea that spins out far too long.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Rude, lewd and occasionally in the nude, The Hangover brings a collection of fresh faces to the familiar raucous male-bonding comedy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie’s compromised tone, wavering between emo introspection and rom-com cuteness, is awkward in all the wrong ways.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    What a shame that The Spirit isn't nearly as good as it looks.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    With the two American actresses miscast, and the two young British lads behaving like a couple of "Brideshead Revisited" rejects, most of the dramatic heavy lifting is left to veteran English actor Wilkinson.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The contrived script is stretched to the breaking point by Reiner's listless direction.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The best sequence is a five-minute set-piece where Clouseau struggles with an accent coach to learn how to order a hamburger like an American.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Pathfinder is aimed more at the action-figure crowd than the history buffs.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Over all, the movie is just funny enough to make you wish it were much better than it is.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Smith’s charisma isn’t always an asset to the movie though. Unlike the unknown Macchio in the original Kid, there’s nothing vulnerable about Smith except for his diminutive size, which is its own problem.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Though Shark Tale will make waves at the multiplexes and move a lot of plastic toys at Burger King, the movie lacks real heart. It feels like a cold-blooded, always moving, profit-making machine.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    This is a guy movie, a gothic creepshow.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The characters, full of blue-blood archness and angst, are partial to self-conscious speechifying.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    As Whatever Works creaks along, the attention-getting nastiness of the first half dissipates and it turns into just another Woody Allen overacted sex farce. Of all the insults hurled about in the film, perhaps the worst is its pandering conclusion. What exactly does Allen take his audience for? A bunch of mindless zombies?
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A high-pedigree, low-interest affair that serves mostly as an exercise in postmortem speculation: Why is a project with so many prominent names attached to it so sterile and lifeless?
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Mediocre movie.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Coming from writers responsible for such material as "Snow Dogs" and "The 6th Day," National Treasure is not so much a no-brainer as a brain-stunner, so audaciously ridiculous you are initially intrigued, then soon irritated by its incoherence.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    There's a whole lot of "American Beauty" and "The Ice Storm" packed into Lymelife.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus takes us deep into the imagination of Terry Gilliam, which once was a splendid place to visit. And might prove so again. But not here, because this film is less a coherent exercise of imagination than a haphazard lecture on its importance, a lecture that eventually dwindles into self-indulgence.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    There’s a scene in a members-only club where Wyatt and Goddard meet, giving the two veteran actors the chance to go eyeball to eyeball for a couple of minutes of barbed dialogue. It almost makes the movie worth it.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie meanders on and on, like a bad sexual dream, until you finally wake up mumbling: Stella, please: leave that groove thang alone.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A movie with a confident sense of its own worthlessness, it speeds by in a flurry of candy-coloured cars, bare midriffs, screaming engines and a pulsing rap soundtrack.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Has a deliberately minimalist, retro look to it as well.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    By turns raw, naturalistic and indebted to John Cassavetes, both stylistically and thematically.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The 3-D is a pain, and the excitable editing, slo-mo and speeded-up action frustrate attempts to watch the athleticism on display, but the last half-hour takes it up a notch.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    What promised to be a teen screwball comedy with a supernatural twist soon descends into special-effects overkill and camp acting from the overqualified supporting cast.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Falling in the pillowy cleavage between mildly awful and slightly entertaining, Burlesque is a clichéd rags-to-diva story that culminates in a series of Christina Aguilera videos.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Only a few events happen in this minimalist film, and most of them keep getting repeated through most of its running time.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie is nothing if not anxious to please. There's a big, diverse, celebrity voice cast – Maggie Smith, Hulk Hogan and Dolly Parton as well as Caine and Osbourne.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    If Jobs had been a producer on Jobs, he would have sent it back to the lab for a redesign.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Most of this is blandly palatable, at least for the first half. Cyrus, though she seldom strays from her two primary modes, pouting rebel or toothy girlfriend, has a winning on-screen presence, if only for her enjoyably abrasive edge in this deep well of pathos.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The effect of so much pretension and so many lovely images eventually becomes soporific.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Though by no means a good movie, The Internship floats along for fairly well for about half its length, thanks to the easy interplay between the two stars and a certain melancholic topicality.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    This is the reliable raunch-plus-sweetness comic formula that goes back through the Farrelly brothers, Adam Sandler's comedies, "Revenge of the Nerds," "Porky's" and "Animal House."
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A tart-coated sugar pill of a movie.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Jawbreaker breaks ground in one way. The movie is notably unpleasant, not just because it's morally offensive, but because it strives for this arch, artificial John Waters tone without any accompanying pay-off in wit.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    This entry has been described as a “cousin” to the other movies. Specifically, The Marked Ones is a Hispanic cousin, customized for Latino audiences in the United States where the series is particularly popular.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Guy Ritchie's Holmes reboot feels both too complicated and too elementary, dear Watson.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    While it’s fine for a director to explore his childhood inspirations, you hope he would bring something a bit more personal to it. Instead, Jack the Giant Slayer, while well-crafted, feels entirely generic.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Lewy’s script doesn’t cop out with any sentimental redemption, but neither does it establish why the self-destructive Lachlan deserves our sympathy.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    As a statement on capitalism or anything else, Capitalism: A Love Story is often embarrassingly simplistic, self-contradictory.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Queen Latifah's energy may be winning and her self-reliance message righteous, but Last Holiday grossly overextends her credit
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie never actually gets to winter: The title is just a clumsy play on the family's surname.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    More ambitious, but also much harder to swallow than the average Hollywood hack effort, In the Cut is a muddle of thriller and art-house phantasmagoria.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie is like a glass of Sprite that has been left on the counter too long: transparent, sweet and flat.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Periodically, thanks to the 3-D, a long and pointy object emerges from the screen, threatening to impale the viewers through their eyeballs, enhancing the movie's guilty pleasure by reminding us that we, too, are made of vulnerable flesh and bone.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Like Frankenstein's monster before the lightning strikes, it's all recycled cold flesh and bolts, without a twitch of originality.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Director Joel Schumacher has pulled no mawkish punches, wringing every drop of emotional potential from the script (adapted by screenwriter Akiva Goldsman from John Grisham's popular novel) down to the last manipulative glance and close-up. Call it A Time to Overkill.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    As with so many movies where the script constructs experiences that are contrived and off-putting, you hope the actors can capture the emotional truth of some scenes, even if the entire apparatus feels bogus.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Piranha 3D is more funny than disgusting, even when screen fills with half-nude swimmers, bobbing like human dumplings in a roiling vat of borscht. This isn't just sick, it's clas-sick!
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Fans of Allen, the comedian, will be glad to hear there are more chuckles here than in his last film, "Bullets Over Broadway." Fans of Allen, the plot craftsman, will find a lot less discipline and imagination in the writing. In truth, Mighty Aphrodite is mighty slight.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    As angst-filled as if it were "Amadeus" and "Lust for Life" rolled into one.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The real weak point is Reiner's listless direction, with too few scenes that almost gel and too many that fall flat.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    History repeats itself, the first time as tragedy, the second time as farce, Karl Marx said. That might explain the possibility of even making a movie such as Stuck.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Near the end of the movie, Django jokes that, after the protests, people may still not know what the WTO is, but "they know it's bad." That's a fair summation of how much insight Battle in Seattle provides for its viewers.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie espouses a kind of Unitarian ecumenical egalitarianism that has about as much to do with medieval times as quantum physics. No one should be offended except -- of course -- those who like movies that excite the mind as well as the pulse.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    But don't worry about remembering the characters - the movie certainly doesn't.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Even with dyed hair, heavy makeup and a cigarette dangling from her bottom lip, Portman still looks like a schoolgirl pretending to be somebody's mom.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The main interest here is the acting, which is, by turns, entertaining or just entertainingly bad, with lots of grungy seriousness and Method-trained twitching, but also some moments of real gusto.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A movie with a double-crossing intelligence plot that's so generic it's an irritating intrusion in a lively chase through the streets and shantytowns of Cape Town, South Africa.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    What should have sizzled fizzles.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Gran Torino skids into the narrative ditch. By the time it jolts to an ending, followed by Clint rasping a tune to the closing credits, you're more likely to be rolling your eyes than dabbing them.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie features Eddie Murphy as a vampire who is both cool and sucks. The same evaluation might apply to the entire film, which is neither as good as it might be nor as bad as you might expect. The long- in-the-tooth Dracula story, which has been updated and set in the black community of contemporary Brooklyn, is a pulpy mishmash of horror and comedy, equal parts the product of its comedian star and its creepshow director, Wes Craven. [1 Nov 1995, p.C2]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    It's a movie about a nice guy with a lot of friends who dies. It's not really about the wider tragedy the film aspires to represent.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Superficial but giddily entertaining backstage documentary.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The story, of course, is a line on which to pin the comic set-pieces, and that's where Pink Panther 2 comes up lustreless. Zwart has no discernible sense of comic rhythm, beyond managing to punctuate scenes with a wall crashing in.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie does offer one historical first: Ferrell, who previously appeared with comedian Sacha Baron Cohen ( Borat) in "Talladega Nights," now appears with skater Sasha Cohen (one point).
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    As shrill, partly-animated musicals about singing vermin go, Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel really isn't all that bad.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    There's a big budget, big cast and big themes about religion, science and life on other planets. But Contact, which aims for awe, ends up with piffle.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Even the visions of attractive half-dressed bodies lolling about in various Madrid bedrooms or leaping into spontaneous music videos don't prove compelling for long.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    While Baron Cohen's lanky physical slapstick and verbal manglings are funny, the movie begins to feel like one of the later, worn-out Pink Panther movies.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A talented cast and moments of brutal violence can't dislodge a sense of ho-hum predictability in Pride and Glory.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    By the time the film reaches its big mushy climax, in which the slackers discover their inner caring during a dopey medieval role-playing battle, the movie starts to feel something like a pleasure again.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The November Man is one of those thrillers that grows progressively more incoherent, and it simply isn’t fast enough to glide over its gaping narrative holes.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    One of those international co-productions full of good intentions and blandly polished results.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Perhaps the film's biggest weakness is that all the characters are so naive and petty you can't really work up much fervour about who sleeps with whom. That would never be a question in a movie like "Casablanca."
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The question is, is the interspecies wrestling match really worth the ineptly acted spy antics, the big flatulence jokes and Steve-o's endless grandstanding? Not without a handy remote control with a mute button, it isn't.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    This is a comedy at cross-purposes -- by turns low-key, bombastic, mildly amusing, manically slapstick. At least there are the fart jokes as a connecting thread.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    It attempts to take local history of the illegal whisky trade and raise it to the level of myth.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Plays precariously close to an unfunny sociopathic case study.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Taken on its own, this is a masterful little slice of computer-generated animation, but it gets lost here in the visual racket.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    While Bale speaks in an anachronistically modern American vernacular, the Chinese cast recite grammatically perfect, phonetic English so stilted you find yourself wishing the film would stick to subtitles. This is not so much a question of a story being lost in translation as a movie that never finds the right story to tell.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    21 years later, in the wake of "The Hunger Games", "Divergent" and "The Lego Movie," another movie about a kid rebelling against socially imposed “sameness” is a case of the same old, same old.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    At almost 21/2 hours, Divergent is repetitiously brutal and drab, with sets that resemble warehouses and industrial junkyards; the action rarely emerges into the daylight before the climactic gun battle.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    In the last third, Payback turns into a joke.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Ultimately, the best thing about (500) Days of Summer isn't its gimmicky script. It's the constant performance of Gordon-Levitt, who shifts, scene-by-scene, from moments of ebullience to abject dejection.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    It's a combination that seems ideal for 10-year-old boys who adore violence, and could well be the cornerstone of the next DreamWorks franchise.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    With less expensive actors, it might just have been called Chase Movie, and played for laughs.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    There are so many events here but no real story. Perhaps that is what's making the drowned kabuki ghost so irate: She's desperate to find a coherent script.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    5 Days of War feels low-budget in everything except its battle sequences.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Trying to pick faults with a sound-and-spectacle juggernaut like Armageddon is like taking an ant gun to an elephant: All the movie's staggering conventional weaknesses -- ludicrous plot, weak characterization, incomprehensible staging and ambient racket -- are irrelevant.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    As long as Chbosky sticks to the story of surviving high school, Perks has a modest charm. But a melodramatic last-act bombshell about Charlie's troubled past, is jarring – like the giant foot of Godzilla descending to squash tender Bambi. It's a case of too much, too late and, ultimately, from a different kind of movie.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Kenneth Lonergan's new film, Margaret, finally released six years after it was shot, now seems destined to become part of film history as one of the more stunning examples of a filmmaker's sophomore slump.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Fighting is a crude love letter to seventies' New York cinema but set in the present.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie is, however, generous in its condescension: Given enough tolerance, cash and a good sex manual, it says, even the mentally handicapped can be just as middle-class and cute as you or me.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    In the battle between dystopian science-fiction movies about butt-kicking young heroines, the new Divergent movie, Insurgent, is actually slightly more believably glum than the third Hunger Games movie, "The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1."
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Unfortunately, the script, based on Deborah Moggach's 2004 novel "These Foolish Things," might better be described as pure British stodge: high-starch English comfort food of more sentimental than nutritional value.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    As a movie trying to make the case for parental management of the education process, Won't Back Down, doesn't make an entirely convincing case.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Have you ever seen a movie you half-liked a lot?
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The major problem with Around the World is that there's just not quite enough Chan, or at least the Chan we want to see, which is the acrobatic clown.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    White Chicks could and should be a much more mischievous movie. A half-dozen writers have managed to create a succession of thin sketches that add up to "Some Like It Warmed Over," with a touch of stink.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The title – Hugh Hefner: Playboy, Activist and Rebel – is fine as far as it goes. But if you leave out "octogenarian mammophile" and "calendar fetishist," you leave something essential out of the story.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Most of the cast range from tolerable to appealing (especially Molina and Pena), with a conspicuous exception. Debra Messing, as the career-driven outsider, is consistently stilted.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    At each stage of the romance, the movie digresses with a series of swing-and-miss gags, often with an abusive twist.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Occasionally, the cast rises above the material.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Though it's undoubtedly ingenious, for such a clever movie, it's a shame Rubber couldn't be more fun.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Suggestive of "X-Men," "The Matrix" and the television show "Heroes," Push is one of those time-mangling thrillers that manages to seem both complicated and superficial.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The questions the movie raises have less to do with science than movie execution: Do the actors sound so robotic because they are playing robots well or humans badly? And did a machine write this dialogue? If so, could we please apply for an upgrade?
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Simultaneously salacious and sugary.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    What gets sacrificed on the altar of this new franchise launch is any real sense of fun.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The new Jason Statham movie Homefront aims to be retro, greasy comfort food but despite its lowly ambitions, there’s barely enough spice here to merit a decent burp.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The mould for all these stories of hot lust and burning cities, creamy-skinned rich girls and their bitter lovers is that grand and grotesque cinema monument, was "Gone With the Wind." You can't go there again and you shouldn't want to.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    At this point, the effect of Myers' one-man Sixties love-in already feels less shagadelic than just shagged out.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Lions for Lambs appears to have taken its inspiration from Al Gore's stolid "An Inconvenient Truth," using the stage lecture and Power Point presentation in lieu of dramatic momentum.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Although a couple of performances here may earn Oscar nominations, by the time you’ve sat through the wreckage, you’re left with the sense that this really must have worked better onstage.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The trouble with Undiscovered isn't that it's actively annoying but it's so dramatically listless it seems determined to become Unremembered.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    This is an excellent movie for watching Jolie, one of the more entertaining sidelines in recent Hollywood movie going. There are two firsts for her here: Angelina does blonde and, more importantly, Angelina does comedy.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Like a lot of things about Zack and Miri, the porn title feels like it's trying too hard.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    This mannered, muddled drama about journalistic lapses and worse, crimes, stars comic buddies Jonah Hill and James Franco (This is the End) in a decidedly unfunny story.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A lazy and mediocre movie, a sort of tepid parody blend of "The Breakfast Club" and "Invasion of the Body Snatchers."
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    What doesn't work so persuasively is Elkoff's script, particularly the overuse of voice-over.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    These Stooges-like antics are more about showing what good sports his stars are than honing any real satiric edge.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    What remains “indie” about At Any Price is that this is an unabashed social-message film – one that plays out like a cross between the agribusiness exposé "Food, Inc." and Arthur Miller’s "Death of a Salesman."
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Too often, the script collapses into what feels like improvisation, in which the characters find a kind of common ground: Infantilism.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Strictly for the midnight-movie crowd, Drive Angry serves up a non-stop stream of female nudity, flying body parts, gun battles and smart-alecky dialogue.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Feels like one of those misguided high-school-teacher exercises in making literary history sound contemporary.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    All in all, Australia is so damnably eager to please that it feels like being pinned down by a giant overfriendly dingo and having your face licked for about three hours: theoretically endearing but, honestly, kind of gross.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The plot is stale though some of the moves are fresh.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    With a couple of more drafts to mend the plot holes and restructure the middle act, Awake could have been saved.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    3 Days to Kill is a comic variation on the "Taken" movies, which Besson also co-wrote and produced, starring Liam Neeson as a daughter-rescuing spy.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The Lost Skeleton also reminds you that real filmmaking -- the illusion of one event following another -- is actually a skill.

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