For 1,230 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Liam Lacey's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial (re-release)
Lowest review score: 0 Dead Man on Campus
Score distribution:
1,230 movie reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Ray
    Ray rambles on for two hours and 40 minutes, mining repetitive episodes like a TV miniseries.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Give it an A for concept -- a bizarre marionette version of a Jerry Bruckheimer-style action movie; B for its occasional moments of convulsively funny comedy; and D for the politics, for pandering to exactly the kind of reactionary sentiments it purports to satirize.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Braff's deadpan performance and dry reactions are deft, and his ability to shape a scene to a punctuation point is impressive, but he's all over the place as a writer.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The movie is also banal in ways that are irritating and second-rate.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    While Bettany and Dunst are both appealing, their chemistry lacks much fizz. As it is, the pair seem less like lovers than bouncy transatlantic cousins.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Too long by about 20 minutes, and arguably too obsessed with the lineage of names only of interest to other surfers, this is a vicarious kick.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Overall, it pushes its "love is good" message with such insistence, so many cheery pop tunes, airport hugs, coincidences and teary smiles, that it feels like one long commercial. Surely love is a desirable enough commodity that it doesn't require such a hard sell.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Truth be told, the full 99-minute movie does not entirely hold water; it feels like three or four good episodes connected with plot padding. Aesop probably wasn't too hot at long-form fiction, either.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Though rich in visual style, the movie is unbalanced in performances and script, ranging, from scene to scene, from go-for-baroque grandeur to strident excess.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The director veers off course and heads straight for mediocrity. It's a disappointing ride.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Director Roger Donaldson ("Smash Palace," "No Way Out," "Species"), working from a script by Leslie Bohem ("Daylight"),does a serviceable job, wrapping his narrative around the big kabooms, but the real interest comes from the extraordinary barrage of sound and spectacle.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Duke rarely operates at more than a TV movie-of-the-week level of originality, but Hoodlum is still an easy movie to enjoy.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    In a film that offers itself as a Gump-esque moral fable, Phenomenon could serve as a case study of When Smart Films Fail.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Director Steve Oedekerk, who also wrote the script, simply provides a frame for the string of Carrey sight gags, which come fast and constantly. Some work, some fall flat, but the overall momentum is never allowed to flag seriously.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    If the movie is essentially a study of a loving family, A Soldier's Daughter Never Cries is hampered by extraneous scenes that are simply self-indulgent on the director's part.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Live Flesh is an often surprising assemblage of attractive parts that never seems to earn a full emotional response. [06 feb 1998]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    As a psychological thriller, it's not so much either thrilling or psychological as it is wonderfully absurd. [25 Mar 1982]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The Corruptor is visually lively and filled with gratuitous destruction. [12 Mar 1999]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Narrative-driven and determinedly unpredictable, The Disappearance of Finbar is true to its mandate as a mystery story to a fault. [18 Jul 1987]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    If Pee-Wee wasn't the most engaging physical comedian since Dick Van Dyke, it would be disastrous. As it is, the opening works well enough to have viewers completely hooked by the time he sets out on the road, like Huck Finn, with his clothes wrapped up in a handerchief on a stick. [10 Aug 1985, p.E9]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    There are moments of salty wit to its teen TV sensibility, and the story offers proof, once again, than there are few stories that can't be adapted to the theme of teenaged popularity politics.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Almost a comedy, though not an entirely successful one: It's too acerbic to be funny and too detached to be really moving.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Parents of young children should be warned: Here's a family-values film that won't be much fun for the whole family.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Hoary, rather than whore-y, Irina Palm is shameless only in its mawkish sincerity.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    With a curiously stubborn kind of integrity, Tron: Legacy follows what did and didn't work the first time – another weak story with sub-B-movie dialogue, partly compensated for by intensely conceived geometric design and special effects.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Shiver-making moments aside, in a important way 127 Hours suffers from the filmmaker's lack of nerve, a reluctance to let the audience taste Ralston's dread and the expectation of a slow, absurd death.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Low on nuance and high on body count, the movie is primarily of interest to fans of Asian action spectacles and followers of the charismatic Chow Yun-fat (Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon), here cast as both a dandyish villain and his idiotic double.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Some of the later scenes capture the spirit of majestic sweetness of "Close Encouners of the Third Kind" and "E.T: The Extra-Terrestrial" period, but the elevated moments don't last. They're relentlessly undermined by the f-bombs, groin kicks, and anal-probing jokes.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Hop
    In this Willy Wonka-like animated world where multihued candies move about on assembly lines, the constant introduction to Rube Goldberg-style devices and slapstick action grows increasingly tiresome.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Serving as his own director of photography under the pseudonym Peter Andrews, Soderbergh picks his angles artfully and allows Carano to demonstrate her arsenal of acrobatic fighting tricks in extended, no-cheating single takes.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The movie rolls on, with more clever but increasingly repetitive action sequences that entertain, but drain the film of any credible sense of jeopardy.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The new version is mildly entertaining with some fun performances.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Essentially an affectionate and personal project to honour Thompson's memory, The Rum Diary occasionally strains to evoke the journalist's surreal black humour.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Sumptuous and schmaltzy, Steven Spielberg's First World War drama, War Horse, is a strange beast of a film.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    It's no great thing, just a better Thing than expected.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    There are sequences in Hong Kong director Wong Kar-wai’s new film, The Grandmaster, that are as gorgeous as anything you’ll see on a screen this year, or perhaps this decade.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Tower Heist is as over-inflated as those Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade balloons that are featured in the movie's climax. Also similarly, it's entertaining in its own predictable way.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    At best, it shows how intense sexual attraction can be a form of temporary insanity.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The real question for audiences isn’t whether Tony Stark/Iron Man defeats the latest supervillain (of course he does), but whether the movie itself rises above the dreaded third-in-a-sequel torpor of "Spider-Man" and "The Dark Knight." Spoiler alert: Yes, mostly, it does.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    A typical mixture of the artful and the repellent.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The background designs are beautiful and there are plenty of lively sight gags, but magic isn’t in the cards.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Brave feels like a merely good-enough children's movie.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    While paying lip service to the spirit of invention and adventure, the movie doesn’t do much for the evolution of children’s animated entertainment.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Walks a line between didactic allegory and realistic drama.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Blend sound with sight, though, and the package becomes more difficult to take.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Though Radcliffe occasionally seems too stiffly callow to be completely convincing in this grown-up role, the movie is a proficient thriller with a potential appeal beyond the star's fan-girl audience.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    In this fitfully engaging, but often patience-straining preamble to Hobbit adventures to come, there is one transporting 10 minutes of screen time. It happens when Bilbo meets the freakish, ring-obsessed creature Gollum.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Tarantino's approach is so enamoured of the exploitation cinema he emulates, there is a serious risk that noble intentions get smothered in juvenile comedy and cinematic grandstanding.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Here are a few adjectives that do not apply to the new Superman movie: Beguiling. Frisky. Nuanced. Quiet. Even the title, Man of Steel, sounds too flighty for this film. Man of Lead, or Man of Plutonium, maybe.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    For those who enjoyed J.J. Abrams’s frisky relaunch of Star Trek back in 2009, the good news is that the new Star Trek Into Darkness is more of the same. The bad news is that Star Trek Into Darkness is, well, a bit too familiar.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Parents will get the historical jokes but are unlikely to be amused; kids won’t get them, but might laugh anyway.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Ezra Miller's sneering, absurdly precocious evil-child performance makes him just another bad-seed horror villain.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Less “amazing” than persistent.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The film sustains some suspense and brooding atmosphere for its first half, but eventually the clichés of character and dialogue drag it struggling to ground.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Compared to many of last year's documentaries (Pina, Paradise Lost 3: Purgatory, Cave of Forgotten Dreams or The Interrupters), this film is distinctly minor league. But it does provide the thumbs-up emotional lift of a bumper-sticker message on game day.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Almost everyone is scum. The venality spreads from the slums or favelas, up the ranks of local militias, crooked police and pandering politicians.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The current postcard from abroad is not great, but not grating.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Warm Bodies is for audiences who prefer stories about mending hearts to munching brains, and ideally, for girls who aren't quite sure yet if they want a slightly scary boyfriend, or a living doll they can dress up.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    So long as you grit your teeth and keep your eyes on the screen, it’s an enjoyable, if almost academic, exercise in bad taste.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    A stylish, brutal affair that delivers grim atmosphere and punishing violence but loses impact in telegraphing its political punches.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Overall, The Salt of Life has more bite but less charm than "Mid-August Lunch."
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Though this RoboCop can’t come close to capturing the clever-silly audacity of the original, one area in which the current film easily surpasses it is in the quality of the cast.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Very charming but very slight.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Even at three hours, the film feels truncated, which raises the question of whether the entire adaptation exercise might have chosen the wrong form. Stretched out to 10 or 12 hours on cable television, Cloud Atlas, the series, would be the talk of the fall television season, and the stories, rather than the thematic scaffolding, would be the right focus of attention.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    For all its incident, A Royal Affair is slow and picturesquely framed – more of a languorously animated coffee-table book than a gripping drama.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Essentially Masterpiece Theatre comfort food, a chance to watch fine actors act without too many complications.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Character development and plotting are rudimentary, though the tongue-in-cheek never gets dislodged while the body count rises.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Roughly-made but illuminating, the Iraq documentary In My Mother's Arms is a brief immersion into life in a Baghdad boys' orphanage.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    In its second half, the movie tips into familiar Gallic farce territory before settling for a formulaic sentimental kicker. As middling comedies go, the French approach has certain virtues. If good wine and long talks with friends can't prevent the inevitable, at least they make the waiting more tolerable.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Some of the most striking moments in Bears are during the film’s closing credits, when we see how alarmingly close the camera crew was to the animals. We’re reminded us that while the movie Bears is both sweet and humane, the real bears are neither.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The Butler may be a sanctimonious cartoon, but it points to events in the civil rights struggle that were as grotesque and extraordinary as any fiction can invent.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The crimes and Gervais and Fey’s performances get stale quickly, though the song-and-dance numbers are fairly clever.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Apart from Mychael Danna’s portentous orchestral and electronic score, Transcendence simply lacks oomph: Shots don’t overwhelm, scenes don’t pop and nothing on the screen gets under your skin.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The movie ends up exactly what it sounds like: a good film for filling the midnight slot at a review cinema or genre festival.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    What becomes increasingly apparent is that Gordon-Levitt hasn’t exactly decided what Jon’s problem is, in a character that seems partly an expression of male wish fulfilment.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    In a contest between passion and pretension, Laurence Anyways reaches a kind of draw. What holds up here isn’t Dolan’s overly decorative filmmaking, but what he gets from his performers.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    If the downbeat plot is depressingly familiar, it’s partly salvaged by the quality of the performances.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    A bit thin on plot, but an unequivocal technical tour de force.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Apparently intended as a blend of "Bridesmaids" and "The First Wives Club," it’s often oddly engrossing, almost despite itself, largely thanks to the performances and the free rein the director gives his stars.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Touchy Feely seems poised to explore the same issues of embarrassing intimacy Shelton mined in her two last films, Humpday and Your Sister’s Sister. But here there’s a new fantastical element, the kind of magical device that might pop up in a minor Woody Allen film.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Like the Irish film "Once," it’s a drama about the lives of musical performers who sing songs within the film to illustrate the emotional journey of a relationship. Broken Circle, though, is painted in much darker hues.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Filmmaker Evan Jackson Leong, who began following Lin when he played for Harvard, also emphasizes the importance of Lin’s tight bonds with his family and the importance of his evangelical Christianity (“I only play for God,” Lin says).
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Rogen’s always a dominating presence, but the doll-like Australian actress, who showed her comic chops in "Bridesmaids," comes close to stealing the movie here, in an uncorked performance full of volatile, liberating mischief.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Fittingly, it’s finally a film about transience and continuity.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Actor Liev Schreiber’s voice-over narration is filled with sonorous urgency, but as the film’s commentators acknowledge, some ideas are a hard sell: How do politicians and regulators convince the public on the benefits of a financial diet when a spending spree sounds much more fun?
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The Summit is a mixture of the inventive and the misguided in its attempt to recreate the circumstances of the August, 2008, disaster on the world’s second-highest mountain, K2, when 11 climbers were killed.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Firth gives the performance his all as a man trapped in a vortex of grief, shame and hate, but as in Scott Hicks’s "Shine," which the film occasionally resembles, there’s an overtidy relationship between trauma and catharsis.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Well-intentioned but emotionally straitjacketed.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    All this is more amusing in theory than practice, partly because Leonard’s world of wiseguys and slapstick violence has become so familiar – the caper-movie default mode.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    All this is initially fascinating, and then progressively less so. The problem is the usual serial-killer issue – things, no matter how weird and kinky, get repetitive.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The Human Scale uses plenty of globe-hopping examples to make up for what it sometimes lacks in depth.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Lucy, you may have twigged, is named after our 3.2-million-year-old hominid ancestor.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Volume 2 picks up the story with an older Joe, now played by Gainsbourg, with her watchful sad face showing the character’s unsatisfied hunger. It seems more von Trier’s script than any great social taboos that cause Joe to go into free fall in a world that becomes more kinky and sinister.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    One distraction is that everything feels smothered in an extra helping of déjà vu sauce: another movie featuring a middle-aged misanthrope with a dewy younger woman; another film with stage magic as a theme.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    As a story about a war that is unresolved, it seems better suited to a provisional “To be continued” than the certainty of “The end.”
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Land Ho! is both loose (shot over 18 days, with an improv quality to the acting) and overcalculated in its series of encounters, small revelations and life-affirming beats. The movie is pleasant and mostly forgettable, except for the character of Mitch.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    A spring-autumn romance that comes with side helpings of local colour and melodramatic backstory.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The larger shell game here is that Edge of Darkness is offered as a political thriller, but with real-world politics removed. What we’re left with is a familiar mechanism for delivering a vicarious, violent, wish-fulfilment fantasy, with Mel in a familiar position, in the driver’s seat, pedal to the metal.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Guy Ritchie's Holmes reboot feels both too complicated and too elementary, dear Watson.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus takes us deep into the imagination of Terry Gilliam, which once was a splendid place to visit. And might prove so again. But not here, because this film is less a coherent exercise of imagination than a haphazard lecture on its importance, a lecture that eventually dwindles into self-indulgence.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Unassuming only in its title.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Fitfully interesting, occasionally cringe-worthy, this is the sort of stagy production that mixes ribaldry and campy overacting that evokes summer theatre productions.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Less an adaptation of its source material than a therapeutic response to it.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    As shrill, partly-animated musicals about singing vermin go, Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel really isn't all that bad.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The questions the movie raises have less to do with science than movie execution: Do the actors sound so robotic because they are playing robots well or humans badly? And did a machine write this dialogue? If so, could we please apply for an upgrade?
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    These Stooges-like antics are more about showing what good sports his stars are than honing any real satiric edge.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Ultimately, the best thing about (500) Days of Summer isn't its gimmicky script. It's the constant performance of Gordon-Levitt, who shifts, scene-by-scene, from moments of ebullience to abject dejection.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The result is an erratically funny but often frustrating comedy, with an interesting premise hobbled by internal inconsistencies and uneven writing.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Actress Kristen Stewart – coolly intense, androgynous, and intelligent – remains the series' strongest asset, as Bela, the emotional centre of the story.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Without either the effect of a full concert spectacle, or up close and personal backstage intimacy, This Is It is neither one thing nor the other.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    It tries too hard too early.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Rude, lewd and occasionally in the nude, The Hangover brings a collection of fresh faces to the familiar raucous male-bonding comedy.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The trouble is that Antichrist feels progressively symptomatic of a director losing heart.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Perhaps the most regrettable crime here is the way that Mann, trying to do too much, robs himself of a great opportunity. Here was a chance to capture the drama of the Thirties.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Taken on its own, this is a masterful little slice of computer-generated animation, but it gets lost here in the visual racket.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A larger discomfort with Extract is an ambivalent attitude about comedy and social class. Mocking an officious middle-manager is always fair game; ridiculing blue-collar workers who resent their mindless jobs just feels mean.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Though competent in its B-movie way, Terminator Salvation lacks the humour, heart-tugging moments and visual pleasure that made the first two movies of the series modern pop masterpieces.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Gran Torino skids into the narrative ditch. By the time it jolts to an ending, followed by Clint rasping a tune to the closing credits, you're more likely to be rolling your eyes than dabbing them.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The old carnival phrase "Close, but no cigar" comes to mind when watching The Brothers Bloom , a globetrotting heist film that starts off terrifically and then progressively deflates.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    As Whatever Works creaks along, the attention-getting nastiness of the first half dissipates and it turns into just another Woody Allen overacted sex farce. Of all the insults hurled about in the film, perhaps the worst is its pandering conclusion. What exactly does Allen take his audience for? A bunch of mindless zombies?
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Only a few events happen in this minimalist film, and most of them keep getting repeated through most of its running time.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    By the time the film reaches its big mushy climax, in which the slackers discover their inner caring during a dopey medieval role-playing battle, the movie starts to feel something like a pleasure again.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Richard Curtis, the writer of "Four Weddings and a Funeral," "Notting Hill" and "Love, Actually," goes off-shore and out of his depth with Pirate Radio .
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie, which is roughly as predictable as the attraction of flies to dung, is a hackneyed mix of sentimentality and anarchic comedy.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The script, despite doses of irreverent humour, feels manipulative, and the music is oblivious to nuance, with a spectacular misuse of Johnny Cash singing "Hurt."
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The problem lies with Williamson's script, which feels as if it has been torn from different places and glued back together like a ransom note.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Most of the personality work in the film is left to Steve Zahn.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie never actually gets to winter: The title is just a clumsy play on the family's surname.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Too often, the script collapses into what feels like improvisation, in which the characters find a kind of common ground: Infantilism.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie espouses a kind of Unitarian ecumenical egalitarianism that has about as much to do with medieval times as quantum physics. No one should be offended except -- of course -- those who like movies that excite the mind as well as the pulse.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    For a movie aimed at children, Shark Boy and Lava Girl is gloomy.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A tart-coated sugar pill of a movie.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The trouble with Undiscovered isn't that it's actively annoying but it's so dramatically listless it seems determined to become Unremembered.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    By the conclusion, the movie turns into the ursine answer to "Free Willy," veering dangerously close to New Age parody: Free your inner bear -- and begin to heal from the last time you got mauled.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    By the final act, involving possibly the most far-fetched scheme since Dr. Evil aimed his death ray at Earth in "Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me," the indifference has become completely contagious.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A glum meditation on isolation and romantic malaise.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A big bloated bore-o. Think of a combination of "Wild Wild West" and "Spy Kids."
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Prime seems aimed at prime-time television, with endless iterations on the same theme of "frustrated relationship" that will finally get resolved during sweeps week in the season before cancellation. Call it: My Mama, the Shrink.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    This is the stage experience documented on film, from the perspective of someone sitting front row centre watching actors pitching for the back rows of the balcony.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    What big ambitions you have, Grandma. And what a disappointingly modest follow-through.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The real weak point is Reiner's listless direction, with too few scenes that almost gel and too many that fall flat.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Queen Latifah's energy may be winning and her self-reliance message righteous, but Last Holiday grossly overextends her credit
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    With the two American actresses miscast, and the two young British lads behaving like a couple of "Brideshead Revisited" rejects, most of the dramatic heavy lifting is left to veteran English actor Wilkinson.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Yes, Final Destination 3 is a roller-coaster ride of a movie from start to -- well, only about 10 minutes later. The fun part is over and we settle down to watch a sadistic assembly line of characters making premature exits.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The best sequence is a five-minute set-piece where Clouseau struggles with an accent coach to learn how to order a hamburger like an American.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Running Scared's relationship to "The Cooler" is roughly that of industrial metal to a quaint torch song.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Simultaneously salacious and sugary.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    There are scenes that may make your stomach feel uncomfortable for a moment but rarely stories that will upset your equilibrium.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The narrative of Lonesome Jim pokes about aimlessly, trying to mine nuggets of amusement.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The whole thing has all the spontaneity of high-school morning announcements.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    As far as story is concerned, the whole thing feels like a rerun of a raucous Saturday-morning television show aimed at hell-raising five-year-olds.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The goal is apparently a double exercise in heartfelt lessons and deep hilarity, but it's hard to tell because the pace feels so lethargic. Director and screenwriter Wil Shriner is a TV-sitcom veteran (Frasier, Everybody Loves Raymond) whose idea of directing a movie is to make another sitcom, only four times as long.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Begins audaciously but goes to extremes to assert conventional wisdom about grownup life, that what is called "normal" is about just holding on.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    This is a comedy at cross-purposes -- by turns low-key, bombastic, mildly amusing, manically slapstick. At least there are the fart jokes as a connecting thread.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    To be very generous toward the filmmakers' intentions, Beowulf & Grendel might be seen as a misguided attempt to lend some modern nuance to a traditional tale of good and emphatic evil. But why pussyfoot? The movie is a lumbering and ludicrous mess.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Feels a little like the new "Pirates of the Caribbean" -- a similar wet fizzle of a sequel for sequel's sake -- but what do we know?
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The differences between the two movies are, first, that Scoop is a comedy and, second, unlike "Match Point," it's not very good, as Allen also returns to pre-Match Point mediocre form.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Fascinating, even when it's fascinatingly bad.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A meditation of life, death, reincarnation and biblical symbolism that feels peculiarly like a head-shop poster, blown up to feature-movie size.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    As it exists, Tenacious D in the Pick of Destiny is strictly for the tenaciously devoted.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Both Smith and his son are appealing presences, but The Pursuit of Happyness seems to take place in a sociological vacuum. Gardner's insight into his difficulties begins and ends with the thought that, in the pursuit of happiness, there's a lot more pursuit involved than happiness, and unasked political questions seem to dangle ominously over the entire movie.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    After the first hour or so of strained puns and wisecracks, you start feeling that the sooner the ending comes, the happier it will be.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The plot is stale though some of the moves are fresh.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Rarely have I seen a movie which made me feel more skeptically Canadian. Please -- it's not true that you can do anything. Stop trying. You might make things worse.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    This is one of those ludicrous, semi-offensive, semi-entertaining potboilers that feels as if the script were dragged out from someone's naughty-book stash.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie does offer one historical first: Ferrell, who previously appeared with comedian Sacha Baron Cohen ( Borat) in "Talladega Nights," now appears with skater Sasha Cohen (one point).
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Notable for its enthusiastic abandonment of any semblance of narrative coherence.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Pathfinder is aimed more at the action-figure crowd than the history buffs.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    With its wry tone and mild emotional disturbances, In the Land of Women is less a chick flick than a chick flicker.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The Invisible isn't the formulaic horror film that the studio is selling it as but surely it wasn't supposed to be an accidental comedy either.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Ultimately, Next is just the next Nic Cage vehicle, another quirky story that allows him to do his patented neurotic balancing act in an askew world. The problem here is not just that Cage's shtick is wearing as thin as his hair; the role is a bad fit.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    In the end, Eagle vs. Shark represents a convincing triumph for Dumb.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    You Kill Me is not so much a bad film as one filled with missed potential and marked by the seams of compromise.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The characters, full of blue-blood archness and angst, are partial to self-conscious speechifying.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The script's attempt to splice together a fumbling love story with a portrait of toxic personality disorder feels incongruous, like a serving of porridge flambé au whisky.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Feels like one of those misguided high-school-teacher exercises in making literary history sound contemporary.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    It's the same package with new wrapping.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    For all these references to the fairytale, Sydney White soon takes an easier path, recycling familiar "Mean Girls" and "Revenge of the Nerds" scenarios.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie begins to feel more like a buffet of contrivance than a feast of love.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The Kingdom is a barely coherent compendium of Middle East fantasies, fears and doubts.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Whether you fully embrace the Harry Potter phenomenon or simply live with it, there's no question that J. K. Rowling is an imaginative story-spinner. The trouble is that she has ruined the field for the legions of the second-rate.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The result is that, rather than tragedy, this unfolds like a plodding morality tale in which Wrath and Cowardice play out their respective parts.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A bit of a docu-mess.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A shrill and silly affair, bordering at times on camp.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A high-pedigree, low-interest affair that serves mostly as an exercise in postmortem speculation: Why is a project with so many prominent names attached to it so sterile and lifeless?
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Whatever glimmers of cleverness Martian Child offers, it all comes to Earth with a thud in the shamelessly manipulative climax.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Lions for Lambs appears to have taken its inspiration from Al Gore's stolid "An Inconvenient Truth," using the stage lecture and Power Point presentation in lieu of dramatic momentum.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    With a couple of more drafts to mend the plot holes and restructure the middle act, Awake could have been saved.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    All of this unfolds with such predictability, the title might as well be The Great Foregone Conclusion.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Almost everything about this starring vehicle for Katharine Heigl feels borrowed from some previous romantic comedy.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Audiences can watch any number of similarly talented comics on late-night television or, even better, get close to the action at a downtown comedy club.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Quaid and Whitaker, who serve more or less as the designated humans in this clockwork contraption of a film, are capable in corny roles, but otherwise Vantage Point is as stuffed with cardboard performances and expositional speeches as any seventies disaster flick.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Leatherhead's a comedy of stock setups and kooky digressions in which nothing really comes to a head, and running at close to two hours, it lacks the essential brevity of the form.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Even with dyed hair, heavy makeup and a cigarette dangling from her bottom lip, Portman still looks like a schoolgirl pretending to be somebody's mom.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A painfully predictable movie.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    One of those international co-productions full of good intentions and blandly polished results.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Playing characters familiar to the fans, we have William Hurt as a blustering general, Tim Blake Nelson as a kooky scientist and Tim Roth as an evil soldier who morphs into a monster. All of them seem to be directing themselves.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    History repeats itself, the first time as tragedy, the second time as farce, Karl Marx said. That might explain the possibility of even making a movie such as Stuck.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The story is shockingly ordinary. The movie plays like an extended mediocre episode of the X-Files TV show or, for that matter, even a contemporary crime series such as CSI.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    All in all, Australia is so damnably eager to please that it feels like being pinned down by a giant overfriendly dingo and having your face licked for about three hours: theoretically endearing but, honestly, kind of gross.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    What a shame that The Spirit isn't nearly as good as it looks.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    In the world of pulp movies, where horror, westerns and Asian exploitation borrow and blend with each other, there's a point where the cross-genre mishmash begins to feel like gobbledegook. That's definitely the case with Sukiyaki Western Django.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Near the end of the movie, Django jokes that, after the protests, people may still not know what the WTO is, but "they know it's bad." That's a fair summation of how much insight Battle in Seattle provides for its viewers.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    With less expensive actors, it might just have been called Chase Movie, and played for laughs.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Throughout, Terence Blanchard's score swells and sweeps, reminding us, at every moment, what we're supposed to feel. If only we knew what we were supposed to think of this trite mess.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The sickly feeling that Body of Lies leaves at its conclusion isn't just about the brutality of its subject; it's the realization that real-life barbarism translates so easily into adrenaline kicks for the multiplex.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A talented cast and moments of brutal violence can't dislodge a sense of ho-hum predictability in Pride and Glory.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Like a lot of things about Zack and Miri, the porn title feels like it's trying too hard.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    If you're going to a no-frills action film, though, at least you want the action to be entertaining, which is where Transporter 3 falls down.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Both original and good; the problem is the original parts aren't good and the good parts aren't original.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    As a message movie, it's preachy without being serious; for an action movie, there's a lot of racket but not much fun.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Most of the cast range from tolerable to appealing (especially Molina and Pena), with a conspicuous exception. Debra Messing, as the career-driven outsider, is consistently stilted.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie is a freakish creature, with lush, painterly animation inspired by Dutch and Flemish masters, attached to a convoluted, gloomy narrative punctuated with scenes of sadism that rival "The Dark Knight."
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Bedtime Stories does divide into two types of comedy: There's the story comedy, in which Skeeter dresses in costume when he performs slapstick and insults people, and then there are the real-life scenes, when he does the same things in regular clothes.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Distinctly middling, London-set romance.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    What is puzzling is how Edward Zwick has taken an extraordinary real-life story about a handful of people who defied huge odds, and turned it into an utterly conventional war movie.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The story, of course, is a line on which to pin the comic set-pieces, and that's where Pink Panther 2 comes up lustreless. Zwart has no discernible sense of comic rhythm, beyond managing to punctuate scenes with a wall crashing in.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Suggestive of "X-Men," "The Matrix" and the television show "Heroes," Push is one of those time-mangling thrillers that manages to seem both complicated and superficial.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Though complete redemption of Brown's fiction may not be possible, Howard's new film at least represents an upgrade from a mortal to a venal movie sin.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    What doesn't work so persuasively is Elkoff's script, particularly the overuse of voice-over.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    One of those comedies that is more peculiar than actually funny.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    This mix of titillation and sentimentality can pass as family entertainment because 17 Again is so weightless, a succession of one-liners, sincere monologues and logical absurdities.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Superficial but giddily entertaining backstage documentary.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Fighting is a crude love letter to seventies' New York cinema but set in the present.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    As a drama, The Soloist is stuck before it starts.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    An efficiently engineered piece of studio product, enjoyable enough at times, but with an unmistakable assembly-line quality.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Shot in country fields and interiors of fading Georgian glory, Easy Virtue has enough traces of Coward's wit to keep you hoping for the first hour or so, but then the film collapses under the weight of too many misguided innovations.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    An Eddie Murphy comedy that's actually endearing.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The trouble is, once you get past the historical information and chummy interviews, you have to put up with the inevitable risk of any ad-hoc jam session: It Might Get Boring.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    As a statement on capitalism or anything else, Capitalism: A Love Story is often embarrassingly simplistic, self-contradictory.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Awkward in ways both intended and not, the fourth feature from author and director Rebecca Miller is an attempt at a comic change of pace for the usually earnest Miller.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Smith’s charisma isn’t always an asset to the movie though. Unlike the unknown Macchio in the original Kid, there’s nothing vulnerable about Smith except for his diminutive size, which is its own problem.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    As angst-filled as if it were "Amadeus" and "Lust for Life" rolled into one.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Each of the actors has strong moments but the relentless intensity becomes monotonous.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Screenwriter Brian Helgeland (L.A. Confidential, Mystic River) is the real culprit here, creating a crude paint-by-numbers fiction that keeps yelling about the importance of the truth while hurtling in the opposite direction.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    There’s little here to improve upon the stilted quality of the original, and it’s even more cumbersomely plotted.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    With his heavy features and grimacing shyness, Dante provides the best entertainment in Swimfan.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Trying to pick faults with a sound-and-spectacle juggernaut like Armageddon is like taking an ant gun to an elephant: All the movie's staggering conventional weaknesses -- ludicrous plot, weak characterization, incomprehensible staging and ambient racket -- are irrelevant.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    As for De Niro, he seems to have licence to do what he wants here, without much help from the writers.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The fun of Biker Boyz should be in the racing, and though director Reggie Rock Bythewood throws around a lot of techniques, nothing really ignites.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie becomes an American salute to military patriotism, anybody's military patriotism. Think of it as "A Few Good Reds."
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The cast is so oddly interesting you wish you could see them doing something less wasteful
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Feels stale, bloated and willing to get by on sheer familiarity.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    It doesn't take a foolish romantic to hope that Myles and Elisabeth live happily ever after. The world just isn't ready for 20 More Dates.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    It's a movie about a nice guy with a lot of friends who dies. It's not really about the wider tragedy the film aspires to represent.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Brainless, but enjoyably over-the-top, the retro gang melodrama, Deuces Wild represents fifties teen-gang machismo in a way that borders on rough-trade homo-eroticism.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Big Fat Liar becomes a progression of increasingly elaborate slapstick stunts, in the brutal, noisy "Home Alone" vein, in which the complexity of the pranks rarely yields a commensurate comic reward.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Having seen the TV series "Hogan's Heroes," we already know that a German prisoner of war camp can be cartooned; Hart's War goes further as a cartoon that takes itself seriously.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The question is, is the interspecies wrestling match really worth the ineptly acted spy antics, the big flatulence jokes and Steve-o's endless grandstanding? Not without a handy remote control with a mute button, it isn't.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The contrived script is stretched to the breaking point by Reiner's listless direction.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Great cast, too bad about the movie.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    With its jazzy saxophone noodlings during the opening credits and its bruised black-and-blue look, it's so quaintly and conventionally pulp that you feel like filing a report with the cliché police.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Marks the emergence of a talented young actress. Not Britney -- who has the amateur's tendency to stand looking awkward after delivering her lines -- but Manning (Crazy/Beautiful), who plays Mimi with the gusto of a young Holly Hunter. Though she has little competition here, when she's on the screen she pretty much owns it.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The characters don't stay still long enough for the audience to worry about them. The high-priced actors (Freeman is especially wasted) are so much flotsam in the big water-tank action scenes.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Sugary but well-acted little emotional button-presser.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The stunt work is top-notch; the dialogue and drama often food-spittingly funny. I can hardly wait for Extreme Ops II, perhaps set atop a South Sea island volcano, with North Korean agents and parasailing.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    It's not so much a movie as a joint promotion for the National Basketball Association and teenaged rap and adolescent poster-boy Lil' Bow Wow.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    It might better be titled The Awkward.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Isn't really a dull film so much as an oddly quaint one that seems to find a comfortable perspective about drastic circumstances.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Feels like a period film in clumsy modern-day dressup.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie is sentimental and reliant on bodily-function humour, but it also has a generous spirit, a multicultural rainbow of characters, and a social message about approaching fatherhood responsibly.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The result is a movie that's both odd and mediocre: not as bad as doing hard time, but not a particularly good time, either.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The updated Dickensian sensibility of writer Craig Bartlett's story is appealing.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    This is a guy movie, a gothic creepshow.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A lazy and mediocre movie, a sort of tepid parody blend of "The Breakfast Club" and "Invasion of the Body Snatchers."
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The style here is much more in the spirit of the smash and slash of the Conan movies than the banter and computer-generated monsters of the Mummy movies.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Not terribly funny. When it does strain for humour, it opts for Farrelly brothers-style gross-outs -- vomit and chewed food and blocked drains -- which makes the movie itself seem like some kind of undigested expulsion rather than a well thought-out idea.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Though it is shaped as a woman-in-peril thriller about obsession, Cherish is about being winningly kooky, not violently insane.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Director Irwin Winkler (Night and the City)is rarely better than pedestrian in handling this story. At worst, the dramatic elements are plain clumsy.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Even if it's accepted simply as glitter-sprayed trash, sophomorically plotted and incompetently acted, Femme Fatale is a uniquely De Palma kind of effluence, an exercise in auteur self-parody.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    For most of its duration, Suicide Kings turns into something like a hoary murder-mystery theatre piece in the Agatha Christie/Clue tradition.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Big, lavish and dumb as camel spit -- is proof that sometimes it's better to let sleeping genres lie.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    This is an excellent movie for watching Jolie, one of the more entertaining sidelines in recent Hollywood movie going. There are two firsts for her here: Angelina does blonde and, more importantly, Angelina does comedy.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The Lost Skeleton also reminds you that real filmmaking -- the illusion of one event following another -- is actually a skill.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    At this point, the effect of Myers' one-man Sixties love-in already feels less shagadelic than just shagged out.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Fans of Allen, the comedian, will be glad to hear there are more chuckles here than in his last film, "Bullets Over Broadway." Fans of Allen, the plot craftsman, will find a lot less discipline and imagination in the writing. In truth, Mighty Aphrodite is mighty slight.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    At each stage of the romance, the movie digresses with a series of swing-and-miss gags, often with an abusive twist.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The word "arachnid," as it's said so contemptuously in the movie, begins to sound suspiciously like "Iraqi," and indeed, we soon see the elite bugs are hunkered down in their desert fortress, resisting the mighty air assaults of the Federation. The conclusion of our story involves unearthing the chief bug.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie is, however, generous in its condescension: Given enough tolerance, cash and a good sex manual, it says, even the mentally handicapped can be just as middle-class and cute as you or me.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Sporadically funny, twisted for sure, it risks becoming as repetitive and shrill as the kinds of programs it satirizes.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Finally, an Adam Sandler comedy that you can sit through without wanting to throw a mallet through the screen.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Gruesome enough; what it lacks is a distinctive revolting personality of its own.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    By turns raw, naturalistic and indebted to John Cassavetes, both stylistically and thematically.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Like Frankenstein's monster before the lightning strikes, it's all recycled cold flesh and bolts, without a twitch of originality.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Jawbreaker breaks ground in one way. The movie is notably unpleasant, not just because it's morally offensive, but because it strives for this arch, artificial John Waters tone without any accompanying pay-off in wit.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Spy Kids 3-D: Game Over, is still offbeat, but more in the sense of unco-ordinated than syncopated.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie meanders on and on, like a bad sexual dream, until you finally wake up mumbling: Stella, please: leave that groove thang alone.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The music, at least, is welcome.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Mediocre movie.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    This might be tolerable if Nair hadn't missed the central point, that Becky Sharp isn't sharp like spice, she's sharp like a razor.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Plays out like a 1950s B-movie with a fat special-effects budget. Brain-numbing dialogue, incoherent action and glaring improbabilities aside, it's a bearable combination of sci-fi paranoia and historical fantasy that drags modern viewers, and the robotic hero of "The Fast and the Furious" movies, Paul Walker, back to the centre of the Hundred Years War.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Light to the point of disposability, Sweet Home Alabama is a small screwball comic idea that spins out far too long.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Breezy, sleazy and a little bit wheezy, The Big Bounce combines a short running time, a portrait of island-life corruption, and a retro surf-and-scam plot. Throw in a vintage, funky-soul soundtrack and you have the ingredients of ever so many bad television shows.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    More ambitious, but also much harder to swallow than the average Hollywood hack effort, In the Cut is a muddle of thriller and art-house phantasmagoria.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Waters's rude, lewd and occasionally nude extended skit takes a simple idea and beats it limp.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Even the visions of attractive half-dressed bodies lolling about in various Madrid bedrooms or leaping into spontaneous music videos don't prove compelling for long.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Seems overstuffed and, in its own way, preachy.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A redemption allegory so poker-faced you might forget that redemption is supposed to be a good thing.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    There's a big budget, big cast and big themes about religion, science and life on other planets. But Contact, which aims for awe, ends up with piffle.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Pimenthal's script consists of the scantiest storyline, framed around a succession of strained Farrelly Brothers-style gags that feel as though they were peeled off the floor of the editing room for "There's Something About Mary."