For 686 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Marc Mohan's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Goodbye Solo
Lowest review score: 0 Cop Out
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 32 out of 686
686 movie reviews
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Marc Mohan
    Gravity isn’t as ambitious as “2001,” but then, what is? It is, however, absolutely a worthy successor, a masterpiece of hard science fiction, and the movie to beat at this point for next year’s cinematography and visual effects Oscars.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    Viewers looking for a propagandistic take will be disappointed, but even those who doubt the overall framework and existence of the so-called War on Terror should appreciate this thrilling tale of the hunt for the world's most wanted man.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 91 Marc Mohan
    While what's on screen is unsparing and clinically presented, the underlying, almost invisible humanity and artistry of the film inspire rather than depress.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Marc Mohan
    As flawless as any film this year and rock-solid confirmation that Joel and Ethan Coen are the greatest filmmakers working in America (and perhaps anywhere else) today.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 91 Marc Mohan
    Sissako, whose previous film, 2006's "Bamako," also tackled political issues with aplomb and complexity, doesn't need to craft an overwrought denunciation of ignorant fanaticism. The humanism with which he approaches both the perpetrators and the victims of the violence inherent in this petty, small-minded tyranny makes the strongest argument possible against the Boko Harams of the world.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    An unrelenting and important exposé of a system that, as depicted here, has no place in the modern world.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 91 Marc Mohan
    When a film like Stories We Tell comes along, you're reminded how powerful and universal even the most intimate and individual lives can be when captured with intelligence and perspective.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Marc Mohan
    For a film that consists largely of a series of talking-head interviews, The Gatekeepers is a riveting a documentary.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    Ida
    Just as austere and demanding as you'd expect a black-and-white film about a Polish nun to be. Don't let that scare you, though.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Marc Mohan
    With a level-gazed approach to its milieu, empathetic but clear-eyed, Winter's Bone practically makes up for 40 years of "Deliverance"-style hillbilly cartoons.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    Her
    As the relationship between Theodore and Samantha evolves, it hews too closely to the expected arc of a romantic drama. In a desire to show how such a pairing could produce the same joys, sorrows, jealousies and insecurities as a human-to-human one, the movie edges close to parody, which it doesn't want to be.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Marc Mohan
    The Act of Killing is exemplary as a history lesson, a character study and a powerful argument for confronting the past.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 91 Marc Mohan
    Takes on the air of a heist film as the preparations proceed, and even knowing the outcome, tension still remains.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 91 Marc Mohan
    At over two hours, it might test the patience of some younger viewers (and some impatient older ones as well), but for anyone willing to take the time, it's an utter treat.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    It's hard to say what's more fascinating: The engaging explication of various paintings by the remarkably articulate docents, the behind-the-scenes looks at the preservation and restoration processes, or the boardroom discussions about the appropriateness of marketing efforts. Actually, that third one probably isn't the most fascinating, but I still wanted more of it.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    The first to take a big-picture view of just how the plans for postwar occupation went so far off track.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Marc Mohan
    The acting is flawless, the world feels utterly real, and the finale accomplishes the miracle of finding in the everyday world something profound.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 91 Marc Mohan
    A film this heartfelt and intelligent about social justice will never be unimportant, but it feels especially relevant today.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 91 Marc Mohan
    The Grand Budapest Hotel shows Anderson engaging with the world outside his meticulously composed frames like never before.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 91 Marc Mohan
    The result is a gripping film which, despite the annoying rugrat, demonstrates how part of leaving childhood behind is learning how and when to lie, and to do it well.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 91 Marc Mohan
    As unpleasant as so many of its going-on are, Wake in Fright works both as an early instance of "Ozploitation" cinema and as a harsh critique of Australian colonialism and the absurdity of trying to bring so-called civilization to this vast arid wilderness.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Marc Mohan
    The thrilling cinematic joyride that, among other improbable feats, puts Michael Keaton, as Thomson, smack in the middle of the Oscar race for best actor.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    What makes the Dardennes' films so powerful is their refusal to judge, positively or negatively, their characters.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Marc Mohan
    The screenplay, which Ceylan and his wife Ebru based on short stories by Anton Chekhov, is wordy but insightful. The widescreen cinematography, capturing the natural wonders that make Cappadocia a popular tourist destination, is crisp in exterior shots and delicately shaded indoors. And the performances are never less than totally convincing.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    The Missing Picture feels akin to last year's great documentary, "The Act of Killing."
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Marc Mohan
    The pacing is perfect, and the action, mostly filmed in a studio, is never less than utterly believable. The director’s first feature, “Margin Call,” was full of rapid-fire dialogue, and he shows off considerable range by following it up with this film.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Marc Mohan
    Anyone who shares Ebert's love of movies and who followed his career will be exceptionally moved by Life Itself, but anyone who appreciates a well-lived life should be touched as well.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Marc Mohan
    It's similar to 2011's "The Loneliest Planet," which examined a similar dynamic between a couple backpacking in the Caucasus Mountains. But Force Majeure (which, as a legal term, refers to unforeseeable events or "acts of God") is sharper and smarter, combining precision-strike storytelling, directorial art, and impressive, often invisible visual effects, including that avalanche scene.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    Even the tiny roles in this Rockwell-meets-Breughel panorama are perfectly, although almost cruelly, cast.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    If film's rapturous reception is due in part to the rarity of filmmaking this skillful within the horror genre, it's hard to begrudge this near-masterpiece of unease any of the praise it's gotten.

Top Trailers