For 116 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 63% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 12.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mark Holcomb's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 47
Highest review score: 90 The Turandot Project
Lowest review score: 0 Dirty Love
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 29 out of 116
  2. Negative: 35 out of 116
116 movie reviews
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Mark Holcomb
    A must-see for opera lovers and a snappy diversion for cinephiles.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Mark Holcomb
    Charles Bukowski, the bard of post-war L.A.'s working-class underbelly, was no ordinary cult writer, and John Dullaghan's thorough, compelling doc Bukowski: Born Into This does a credible job of showing why.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Mark Holcomb
    A quietly impassioned, genuinely stirring indie rarity.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Holcomb
    It may not be particularly innovative, but the film's crisp, unaffected style and air of gentle longing make it unexpectedly rewarding.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Holcomb
    Actually manages a fresh perspective. The director, camera in tow, had unimpeded access to the devastation for a full day before being shooed away by officials, and the footage he captured (sans commentary) is both gut-wrenchingly familiar and disconcertingly foreign.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Holcomb
    Continues Disney's trend of crafting animated movies as much for adult viewers as for their pre-adolescent progeny.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Holcomb
    There's something refreshing about a pulp drama that turns on the notion that redemption is a sucker's fantasy. That knowledge may not have saved Goines, but it informs Dickerson's adaptation and results in stellar neo-noir.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Holcomb
    Happily, beneath the film's nostalgic veneer and tooth-rattling visual and aural effects lies a mature ambiguity that's unusual for a holiday blockbuster -- and all but unheard of in a Tony Scott movie.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Holcomb
    The rapid-fire satirical sophistication (scatology notwithstanding) and lovingly rendered pulp surrealism of this sequence should delight adults, while kids will get a charge out of the heroines' grown-up-defying chutzpah.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Holcomb
    It's a remarkably assured and humane feature debut.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Mark Holcomb
    What finally makes Town Bloody Hall so compelling -- and unsettling -- is the impression that such serious, spirited debate is a thing of the past.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Holcomb
    Largely sidesteps sentiment in favor of a tentative hopefulness.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Holcomb
    Eschewing the jock-like aversion to "artiness" inherent in most sports docs, John Hyams's contemplative snapshot of professional bull riding, Rank, ups the ante for the form.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Holcomb
    Porterfield intersperses these delicately underplayed scenes with doc-style question-and-answer exchanges that, while initially jarring, achieve maximum cumulative impact.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Holcomb
    What keeps Murderball from devolving into redemptive drivel is its insistence on treating the players it profiles as jocks first and disabled men second.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Holcomb
    While far from perfect, Hitch is a rare studio product that earns the goodwill it smugly demands.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Holcomb
    In the end, Milk and Honey's contrived connections blossom into a disarmingly effective reckoning with loss and regret.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Holcomb
    A fresh and uncompromising account of emotional self-immolation and romantic flux. And it has a happy ending to boot.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Holcomb
    This earnest, well-observed weepy has more depth than its genteel trappings might imply.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Holcomb
    The result is a film as tenacious, peculiar, and likable as Burt Munro himself.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Holcomb
    Sanaa Hamri's brisk, refreshingly understated romantic comedy Something New is the rare movie that delivers on its title's promise.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Holcomb
    Stilted and gloomy as it sounds (and sometimes is), The Tenants gets by on its nimble approximation of Malamud's robust prose, subtle turns of deadpan humor and gut-tingling menace, and remarkable performances. McDermott does credible work here, but Snoop's casting is a stroke of genius.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Holcomb
    Unusually impassioned indie.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Holcomb
    By turns whimsical and painful.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Holcomb
    Too brisk and plucky to dislike.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Holcomb
    The scenario recalls everything from "High Noon" to "Unforgiven," but Costner is less interested in grappling with the grim ambiguities underlying those films than in codifying them. There's still much to like, including the warm, thoughtful performances and cinematographer James Muro's fearless use of natural light.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Holcomb
    Weird, frivolous, and impossible to dislike.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Holcomb
    Unfortunately, Rae's film is split down the middle, and the appeal of its latter half depends on your tolerance for earnest politico-poetry set to wailing rock guitar and Native American chants and extraneously endorsed by celebrity talking heads. The backstory portion of the film, though, is riveting.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Holcomb
    Tender irony and dark humor abound in Israeli director Eran Riklis's latest account of bureaucracy colliding with burgeoning compassion.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Holcomb
    Manages--before faltering under the weight of its own pretensions--to be pretty scary.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Holcomb
    Becomes more satisfying than the stock thriller–star vehicle it begins and ends as.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Holcomb
    This sly, sobering doc exposes the grievously fucked-up priorities surrounding the sport in a small town with little else on which to hang its hopes.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Holcomb
    Makes for unexpectedly giddy viewing.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Holcomb
    Skeleton may be 100 percent cult-in-a-can, but aficionados should feel sated. All others are advised to bring copious amounts of controlled substances.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Holcomb
    He (Jacobs) and cinematographer Chris Menges compose the film largely in close-ups, and the effect is appropriately unnerving. Regardless, unfavorable comparisons to "Nine Queens" are inevitable.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Holcomb
    Woo's film is in some ways closer to Dick's -- and his own -- pulp roots, and if he lazily quotes himself (and, inexplicably, Aldrich's "Kiss Me Deadly") once too often, he at least gets loose, spirited performances from his cast -- Uma's post-"Kill Bill" gravitas notwithstanding.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Holcomb
    Best in Show succeeds only insofar as you're willing to laugh at a bunch of sad freaks.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Holcomb
    Despite Herrington's skill at capturing the physicality of the game, Stroke is strictly for golf nuts and masochists--assuming there's a difference.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Holcomb
    All the shell-shocked wryness, irredeemable remorse, and unaccountable will to survive that the movie attempts to embody are realized in Gyllenhaal, and the actor makes it possible to root for Moonlight Mile despite its flaws.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Holcomb
    Thanks to an uninhibited screenplay and the easy, unforced chemistry of its ensemble cast, Punks is mostly good, snappy fun.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Holcomb
    The film's real flaw is its limited focus.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Holcomb
    Despite its affinity for whimsy over realism, Small Voices effectively captures the embittered desperation and ragged dedication of its exploited teachers.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Holcomb
    Guaranteed to polarize audiences. Is her insistence on taking every measure possible to save little Nicholas heroic or monumentally self-serving?
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Holcomb
    Fans of Hellblazer are bound to be disappointed.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Holcomb
    Like a jigsaw that's more fun to assemble before you know how all the pieces fit, Greg Harrison's brain-teasing meta-thriller November is less compelling the more apparent its solution becomes.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Holcomb
    As with the director's other films, all that keeps Unfinished from being a complete, treacly bore is its robust performances.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Holcomb
    Ouimet versus Vardon probably was the greatest golf game ever played, and Paxton and Frost do it justice, but I wouldn't sit through another simulated hole of it for Tiger Woods's salary.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Holcomb
    Few clichés go unexercised, but there's also something quietly amazing going on here: For once, American Indians are portrayed not as spiritually attuned mystics or powerless patsies but as ordinary working stiffs, or at least the cinematic equivalent thereof.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Holcomb
    Falling somewhere between fratboy porno wish fulfillment and Europhobic sex-tourism scare flick, Eli Roth's taut, wily, but ultimately pointless shocker Hostel is neither as transgressive nor as grueling as it aims to be.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Holcomb
    Spear has all the earmarks of a middling Indiewood product, from its competent second-tier cast (including "Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman" hunklet Chad Allen in a dual role as a slain missionary and his grown son) to its earnest plotting and leaden pacing.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Holcomb
    There's a certain gutsy allure to the wildly improbable proceedings.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Holcomb
    An engagingly grim psychological thriller.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Holcomb
    A competent if overlong blend of policier, sci-fi conspiracy thriller, daikaiju eiga (giant monster) stompfest, and tragic romance. It's also anime (short for "cheaper than live-action").
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Holcomb
    The climactic shocker is far too exacting, but Lewis nails the milieu, and has the sense to not spell out every motivation in capital letters.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Holcomb
    An exhilarating serving of movie fluff.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Holcomb
    The results are predictably lachrymose, especially with the reinstated "unhappy" ending from the original French version.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Holcomb
    Comfortably familiar. It lacks the tension between grandeur and intimacy that characterizes the films it apes.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Holcomb
    Saw
    With its toilet-bobbing and blood spurting and Elwes's fey, Vincent Price–like mugging, Saw succeeds in capturing something like Takashi Miike by way of William Castle. Happy Halloween, indeed.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Holcomb
    Close enough in spirit to its freewheeling trash-cinema roots to be a breath of fresh air.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Holcomb
    Most Wanted isn't aiming for social commentary, but it isn't too difficult to enjoy its good-natured humor.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Holcomb
    This Phoenix screams hack job.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Holcomb
    Director Goyer, who wrote all three Blade films, deserves credit for sticking with the character, but aside from the effectively staged action sequences Trinity is cheap-looking and laughably inept.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Holcomb
    If Michiko Yamamoto's screenplay overdoes Magnifico's holy-fool virtue to the point of hysteria, de los Reyes's fluid compositions, dead-on pacing, and knack for eliciting naturalistic performances make the story uncommonly cathartic.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Holcomb
    Levant and his screenwriting posse attempt to wring maximum hilarity from this setup, but it's just too schizoid.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Holcomb
    At its heart is a deep, unresolved ambivalence about child rearing.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Holcomb
    The Great Raid is ultimately scotched by History Channel–worthy nostalgia.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Holcomb
    Who is this movie's target audience, anyway? Preteens will be bored stupid, while adults are unlikely to want to revisit puppy love in such grueling detail. The lingering, soft-focus, slo-mo shots of Rosemary that punctuate the action suggest a constituency I'd rather not contemplate.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Holcomb
    Treading the same supernatural turf trampled by "Somewhere in Time" and "Frequency," director Alejandro Agresti's gooey, ostensibly spooky romance yarn The Lake House flounders less on its thudding familiarity than on its mood- killing dourness.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Holcomb
    Uneasy mélange of occult thriller and insane-asylum-as-social-microcosm parable.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Holcomb
    A diverting pulp time-waster.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Holcomb
    Rosenfeld's film doesn't have much of a story to tell and tells it rather routinely.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Holcomb
    There's nothing wrong with a little creative license, but the abundance of self-serving fabrication in City by the Sea not only diminishes LaMarca's experience and cheapens McAlary's work, it all but desecrates the memory of the real murder victim.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Holcomb
    Anand manages to work in shamelessly exploitative September 11 footage between numbers, but aside from this sequence, Love couldn't be more giddily benign.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Holcomb
    No "Triplets of Belleville," this French animated feature was hatched as an idea for a video game, and it shows.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Holcomb
    As earnest and smart-alecky as an entire season of Designing Women, Ya-Ya is sure to score with its redemptive family melodramatics and stock eccentric characterizations.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Holcomb
    First-timer Wayne Kramer brings pathos to Bernie and Shelly's fraught relationship, but his film never amounts to more than a cute idea stretched to poker-chip thinness.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Holcomb
    Suffice it to say that if you've always wondered how a fish out of water and a band of resourceful yokels would behave in the Quebec hinterlands, this is your movie.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Holcomb
    Thematic muddle aside, the film's appeal lies in Burke's ranting charisma, Julie Christie's thankless turn as a sympathetic doctor, and Michael Spiller's radiant cinematography, which frequently captures the mythic grandeur that eludes Hartley's narrative grasp.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Holcomb
    The resolution is as surprise-free as it is improbably sunny.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Holcomb
    These after-school specials are distinctly depoliticized and seem tailored for Western audiences, so the African settings feel oddly superfluous.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 30 Mark Holcomb
    John Schultz's wan, unfunny The Honeymooners is unlikely to tickle devotees of Jackie Gleason's archetypal yuk-fest.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 Mark Holcomb
    Comes off as an overlong, overstuffed promo for an "industry" that hasn't needed promoting since the movie's target audience was in diapers.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 30 Mark Holcomb
    A clumsy graft of Chekhovian high dudgeon and harsh, Albee-esque psychological realism that probably worked better onstage.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 30 Mark Holcomb
    Stupefyingly benign.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 30 Mark Holcomb
    It has Adrien Brody in his last pre-"Pianist" role, leading one to assume that the film -- which veers torpidly from antic humor to mortifying sentimentality -- would have remained shelved were it not for his Oscar coup.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 30 Mark Holcomb
    Cynically accumulates plot twists while showing little regard for suspense or audience sophistication.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 30 Mark Holcomb
    Rifkin milks the generic Bukowski-land setting for all its melodramatic potential, but what little grace his tale of precarious skid-row dignity achieves is pushed into the margins by predictable plotting and tiresome histrionics.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 30 Mark Holcomb
    Like the action movies of yore (you know, the 1980s), Catwoman is simultaneously overstuffed and undernourished.
    • 12 Metascore
    • 30 Mark Holcomb
    The most that can be said for Slackers -- aside from the unqualified pleasure of Schwartzman's unfaked, puppyish weirdness -- is that it doesn't abandon its putrid ideals for the sake of a neat finish.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 30 Mark Holcomb
    To call this action gambit formulaic is to sell it short: The Rundown runs down more formulas than a month's worth of complimentary premium cable service.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 30 Mark Holcomb
    Laughably unscary.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 30 Mark Holcomb
    Appallingly violent.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 30 Mark Holcomb
    It all becomes little more than feel-good-about-feeling-bad window dressing, like an issue of "Utne Reader" in Dolby Surround Sound.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 30 Mark Holcomb
    What's unexpected is how thoroughly The ABCs of Death's ample duds overshadow its treasures, and how uninspired it feels as a whole.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 20 Mark Holcomb
    This Dick & Jane is precisely the kind of social-problem comedy you'd expect from well-intentioned millionaires unaccustomed to putting their money where their mouths are.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 20 Mark Holcomb
    Rote sequel that surely no one was waiting for: Like the serially thwarted Death (the only "character" to return from the first two Final Destination movies), audiences are required to endure banal exposition and junior-high-level foreshadowing before being treated to the nauseatingly detailed scenes of CGI slaughter.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 20 Mark Holcomb
    Good intentions or not, ineptitude and cloying sentimentality don't do anybody any favors.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 20 Mark Holcomb
    It's nauseating, unfunny stuff, unmitigated by the revelation that Griffin's mom physically abused him.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 20 Mark Holcomb
    Wanders all over the map thematically and stylistically, and borrows heavily from Lynch, Jeunet, and von Trier while failing to find a spark of its own.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 20 Mark Holcomb
    Danny Provenzano's mafioso melodrama is the immoral vanity project to end immoral vanity projects.