For 252 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mark Jenkins' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 90 Wild Grass
Lowest review score: 5 Grown Ups 2
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 19 out of 252
252 movie reviews
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    A preachy parable of suburban discontent, Shorts probably has enough kid-oriented slapstick to please the under-12 set. But it's not likely to rival writer-director Robert Rodriguez's "Spy Kids" series in long-term appeal.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    The effect is weirdly lulling. Viewers with a special connection to this story, or a weakness for little boys and single dads, may find The Boys Are Back moving. For everyone else, the movie is merely picturesque.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    For a hymn to panic and hostility, the movie is curiously artful. But only the most sympathetic viewers will find that its poetry outweighs its belligerence.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    Thanks to his major role in songwriting, Krieger is credited repeatedly, but the other two players recede as the band increasingly becomes The Jim Morrison Show.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    Here and There has been compared to such Jim Jarmusch films as "Stranger Than Paradise," and "Lungulov" does emulate Jarmusch's deliberate pace, minimal dialogue, deadpan humor and strong sense of place. In fact, Belgrade is the movie's most compelling character, its tattered charm underscored by back-street New York locations that oddly evoke Eastern Europe.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    Triumph seems the wrong note for a feature film about mass murder. Yet Gallenberger insists on an old-school historical melodrama, with the darkest of terrors leavened by humor, tenderness and even romance. It's only the terror that rings true.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    Oddly, Countdown to Zero ends by suggesting that viewers get those nukes abolished by texting their disapproval to a phone number listed in the credits -- as if the governments of China or North Korea (or the United States, for that matter) are just waiting for a gentle rebuke from civic-minded documentary viewers.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    As "Blood Simple" fans should expect, Noodle Shop is a comedy of presumed deaths and unexpected revivals, with some victims flat out refusing to stay in their shallow graves.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    The deliberate pace may suggest that the film is being thoughtful, but Let Me In is really just an exploitation movie with the confidence to take it slow.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    Freakonomics' commercial success reflected the once-fashionable notion that economics could explain, well, everything.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    The movie is crisp and contemporary enough to inaugurate another franchise for Statham.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    The broad comedy clashes with the movie's final message: that 6,000 girls face genital mutilation every day.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    The movie has more sensibility than sense, but it seems cunning next to such silly tough-girl fare as "Kick-Ass" and "Sucker Punch."
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    Historical records being what they are, the filmmakers are forced to speculate about certain things, but where facts are known they generally adhere to them.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    An entertaining concert film, but not an incisive character study.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    Puzzle has some gentle fun with the clash of staid and hip.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    Circumstance is best during its simpler, more naturalistic moments. In one, Mehran rebuffs a junkie who stumbles into the mosque, only to see that an Islamic hardliner is more compassionate.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    It was frantic sex that earned Shame an NC-17 rating, but this arty drama is mostly slow and methodical. And thoroughly unsexy.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    An incestuous payoff might be expected, given the casting of Green; she first attracted widespread attention in Bertolucci's "The Dreamers," as a young woman who is unusually close to her brother. But whatever happens, Womb is more melancholy than erotic.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    After nearly 90 minutes of human folly, though, Surviving Progress can't very well conclude with a tribute to mankind. So, to end on a hopeful note, the movie turns to a chimp.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    The protagonists of Late Bloomers have a problem, but it's not that they're getting older. Their dilemma is that they're reacting so differently to aging.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    Ultimately, this intriguing but scattershot movie turns on the incompatibility of two worldviews - the corporate-financial vs. the environmental-spiritual.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    Provocative yet far from definitive, Pink Ribbons, Inc. is a critique of "breast-cancer culture." It could even be called a blitz on pink-ribbon charities and their corporate partners - though to use that term would be to emulate the war and sports metaphors the documentary rejects.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    By concentrating so intently on the psychically unattached Joby, Kim hinders dramatic and character development. Her "Treeless Mountain," the Korea-set saga of two young sisters, was also quiet and open-ended. But the interplay between the two girls provided warmth and depth. For Ellen feels both colder and slighter.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    The House I Live In shows Nannie Jeter as she hopefully watches Barack Obama's 2008 electoral victory, but doesn't analyze the current president's apparent reluctance to significantly alter anti-drug policies.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    In a rare bit of explication, the movie notes that "buffalo" has two connotations in Thailand. For rural folks, it refers to the strength and perseverance of the large animals, called "kwai" in Thai. To urbanites, however, a buffalo is a hick.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    As an investigation into American municipal corruption, Broken City is, well, damaged. But as an opportunity for hard-boiled types to trade threats, blows and caustic banter, this modern-day noir works reasonably well.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    The plot fails to deliver a single surprise, however, and the characterizations are thin even by the standards of the tough-guy genre.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    This China/Hong Kong co-production flips the formula: The fantastic images are solid, but the action is less substantial.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    Teresa's doggedness parallels the movie's own. Paradise: Love would be more compelling if it had a second act in which either its protagonist or one of her boy toys came to some sort of realization. Instead, Seidl's strategy is to reiterate and escalate, which is finally more exhausting than illuminating.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    Winterbottom's 2004 film "9 Songs" is the most sexually explicit picture ever to get general release in Britain. Oddly, given its subject matter, The Look of Love turns out to be much tamer; as Raymond's shows and magazines become raunchier, the director sidesteps or actively censors the steamiest material.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    Rickman is too theatrical, and too British, to vanish entirely into the person of Hilly Kristal. But he's entertaining to watch, and ultimately one of the more persuasive actors in a movie that suffers from as many odd casting decisions as Lee Daniels' The Butler.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    German history and culture are among Sokurov's concerns in this visually compelling, intellectually scattershot movie.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    The original was a little sharper, with actual satirical swipes at modern British life. The remake replaces some of that material with lazy pop-culture gags, most of them specifically African-American.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    Brand's character, who combines Bono's moral sanctimony with Keith Richards' supernatural hedonism, ultimately doesn't add up.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    This is among the better Allen knockoffs of recent years, even if a few of its riffs seem hazardously off-key.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    Directed by Neil Burger, whose "The Illusionist" also pulled an upbeat coda out of a hat, Limitless is entertaining for much of its running time. It's glib, and it's overly fond of hyperdrive pans, psychedelic montages and swift rack-focus shifts.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    The glib story and hectoring structure undermine the filmmakers' best intentions.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    For those already somewhat familiar with the subject, the directors' distillation of these 40 hours of film will expand their knowledge - if not their consciousness. But other viewers may spend the whole movie wondering exactly when the merry magic is going to kick in.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    A Good Old Fashioned Orgy deserves credit for not entirely wimping out.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    It's a campy rampage that runs a few minutes shy of four hours, dooming what otherwise would likely be a bright future as a midnight movie.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    It's the sort of well-meaning fable that's ultimately more admirable than persuasive.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    It's populated by characters who are just too good to be plausible.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    Orchestra of Exiles will interest anyone who's concerned with European Jewry or classical music in the first half of the 20th century. But it provides mostly the facts of Huberman's legacy and little of the flavor.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    The movie's violence, although gruesome, flirts with slapstick, and the story appears bound for domestic comedy when all the major characters sit down for Thanksgiving dinner at June and Chet's grand Victorian farmhouse. But the meal becomes more freak show than satire.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    J.H. Wyman's script is grim and fairly audacious, without anything so goofy as the silliest stuff in "Dragon Tattoo." The story involves some Grand Guignol violence, but its wildest notion is that a suicide-mission plot might somehow yield a happy ending.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    DeChristopher's primary concern is climate change, which is no small issue. But Bidder 70 would be more compelling if it had used the U.S. government's assault on the ad hoc activist to also discuss threats to the American political environment.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    While Europa Report recalls such small-ensemble stuck-in-space flicks as "Moon" and "Sunshine," it's basically "The Blair Witch Project" relocated to the vicinity of Jupiter.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    So the principal point of controversy involved here is not Jobs himself, but Ashton Kutcher, who plays him. The actor's approach is to ape Jobs' speech and movements, which he does quite well. Whether mimicry qualifies as characterization is a question for Jobs' viewers to answer for themselves.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    Many of the White House scenes are jarringly motley, as Whitaker maintains Gaines' dignity against a series of performances that range from bland (James Marsden's JFK) to cartoonish (Liev Schreiber's LBJ). It comes as a relief when Daniels reduces Jimmy Carter and Gerald Ford to TV clips — though that strategy makes the film even more of a stylistic jumble.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    Zaytoun is different: This time, the director allows his characters to cross the frontier. That makes for a story that's sweeter, but also less convincing.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    Basically the anti-"Kill Bill." Both movies are quilted together from their auteurs' favorite Asian action flicks, but where Tarantino's was overheated, Reeves' is elegantly iced.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    The film was shot entirely in South Africa, and revels in golden light on dry yellow grasslands. But it's still a very British movie, a respectful view from a suitable distance.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    Cooper does slow the action and set it in the least glamorous of circumstances, which drains the pleasure from the thriller conventions. But just because Out of the Furnace isn't much fun doesn't make it profound.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    If you're only going to see one film about the Battle of Stalingrad — and there are many — Stalingrad would be the wrong choice. Russian director Fedor Bondarchuk's treatment of the World War II turning point is shallow and contrived, if sometimes impressively staged.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    Shot in New Mexico on a limited budget, Boys of Abu Ghraib is a credible depiction of the tedium, frustration and humiliation of wartime service. (Jack gets coated in human excrement not once but twice.) Naturalistic scenes of boxing, bantering and masturbation, set to a rap and hard-rock score, emphasize that these boys are young American everymen.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    The movie wavers in tone, occasionally lurching into supernatural fantasy, and withholds information in a manner that’s more annoying than tantalizing.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    As is typical of the genre, the plot gets sillier as it unfolds, while the violence gets gnarlier.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    After evoking only warm smiles in its first half, Le Chef ultimately veers into farce.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Perhaps seeking to retain something of the book’s rhythm, Knight and Hallstrom let a very simple story meander for two hours and include episodes that serve no dramatic purpose.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Snow Zou’s directorial debut does have a few noteworthy attributes: attractive stars, sun-dappled cinematography and an audacious payoff.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    In the wake of numerous documentaries and a big-budget film, writer-director Clare Lewins can find little fresh material.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Like “The Intouchables,” Samba is loosely plotted and is at least 20 minutes too long. It seems ready to end half a dozen times before it finally does, with ironic payoffs for Samba and Alice that are too glib to be satisfying.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    A theological trifle that ultimately twists itself into a romantic comedy.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    If nothing else, while watching Ruppert, you'll believe he believes this stuff.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Unfortunately, brutality is about all this update of 1941's The Wolf Man can do well. Mutilations, decapitations and disembowelments are handled with aplomb in the first R-rated film from director Joe Johnston (Jumanji, Jurassic Park III). But everything that doesn't involve gore feels like an afterthought.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Despite the local color, the movie isn't especially globalized. The major characters all speak English, and the action sequences throb to the music of Lady Gaga, the Roots and Gorillaz.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    But c'mon! Erotic obsession, catfights, naked chicks making out -- at heart Chloe is a midnight movie, and all the Vivaldi in the world can't change that.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Next to the hopelessly inexpressive Stallone and the English-impaired Li, Statham emerges as the movie's principal wit. But the script furnishes him with only a few deadpan quips. Besides, it's no great accomplishment to be the funniest guy in a Sylvester Stallone flick.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Nanny McPhee, the homely yet exemplary governess, is back. Why? Hard to say, but one thing is certain: Writer-star Emma Thompson didn't do it for the kids.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Despite dramatic Hawaiian locations, up-to-date visual effects and a bit of nontraditional casting, the movie feels not especially brave and far from new.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    However much Uxbal tries to help Barcelona's dispossessed, Biutiful doesn't really have anything to say about the modern world's economic migrants. Indeed, it could even be said that the movie exploits them.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Miral stumbles, both thematically and stylistically. The two things that undermine the director's balance? Peace and love.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    There's plenty of material for a lively, profound documentary about Norman Foster. But How Much Does Your Building Weigh, Mr. Foster? is, by design, lightweight.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    It's hard to make a movie about a pederast without being exploitative, and Michael eventually comes to feel like an art house stunt.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    The movie is less than incisive, but it's utterly well-meaning.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    "Humanize" might not seem the obvious verb for what happens in Chimpanzee, Disneynature's latest kiddie documentary. But it's dead on; this escape to the planet of the apes is anthropomorphic to a fault.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Austrian documentarian Michael Glawogger's Whore's Glory is no "Pretty Woman." But neither does it qualify as an expose.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    The movie presents grim assessments from such experts as the Pacific Institute's Peter Gleick and professor and author Robert Glennon, yet it ends with a flurry of hopeful notes.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    "Driving Miss Daisy" this ain't. Except that it sort of is.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Set in a high-tech yet shabby future, the remake of Total Recall is a fully realized piece of production design. But its script, credited to six authors, is more like a preliminary sketch.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Perhaps the clearest evidence that Yelling to the Sky is based on Mahoney's own life is that the movie lets its most troubled characters off pretty easy.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Music drives the movie, and the producers popped for the real stuff: Robert Johnson, Moby Grape and - curiously - the Sex Pistols are all here. The soundtrack is so overstuffed that it relegates Beatles and Dylan tunes to the end credits.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Too much of this seething drama is devoted not to characterization but to posturing.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Pretty but inert, To the Wonder is a vaporous mystery wrapped in a gauzy enigma — a cinematic riddle that'll appeal principally to those eager for another piece, however tiny, of the puzzle that is Terrence Malick.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Like the recent "Mud," The Kings of Summer is a tale of feral adolescent pals in search of freedom and adventure. The movies even share essentially the same awkwardly contrived climax. But of the two films, The Kings of Summer is more of a comedy, with a depiction of the eternal war between teen and parent that's downright farcical.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Hypermacho but tongue-in-cheek, the first 20 minutes of 2 Guns are enormous fun.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    A 90-minute biography can't include everything, of course. But Lovelace comes on like an inquiry into the '70s zeitgeist, only to retreat into melodrama. Ultimately, the movie relies as heavily as any porn feature on its intrepid female lead. Rather than exploiting Seyfried, however, Lovelace just sort of wastes her.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Aside from the giggles induced by the romance-novel bits, the movie's principal hazard is exhaustion. There are too many characters, and too many of them spend too much time morphing into something else. Five more like this? That would be demonic.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Reich has a good sense of humor, as is virtually required of an adult who's less than 5 feet tall — he has Fairbanks disease, the same condition that accounts for Danny DeVito's stature — so he's pretty much guaranteed a laugh when he hops to his feet and asks if he looks like an advocate of "big government."
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Set to Jeremy Turner's spare and mournful score, Narco Cultura is ultimately more pensive than lurid.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    If Nenette as a character is more a narrative convenience than a depiction of an actual condition, her permanent childhood does provide the 63-year-old Balasko with an exuberant, unpredictable role. That she continues to make work for herself as both an actress and a director is a good thing, but it would be better if she found a more ambitious writer.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 45 Mark Jenkins
    This slackers-go-gangsta comedy demonstrates that less than 90 minutes can be a very long time.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 45 Mark Jenkins
    There are some funny bits and characters around the edges of The Incredible Burt Wonderstone, but its core is empty of humor. In fact, this purported satire of Las Vegas magicians is a three-void circus: the script, the central character and the main performance.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 45 Mark Jenkins
    In the real world or a realer movie, the deceitful Arthur and the larcenous Mike would eventually get in big trouble. Yet this road movie is headed not toward serious consequences, but toward docile acceptance. In spirit, it turns out, Arthur Newman is a pretty much a Wallace Avery.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 45 Mark Jenkins
    If the movie fails to conjure soiled 19th-century Paris, that's not primarily because it was shot in Hungary and Serbia. More problematic are the English-language dialogue and actors who speak in a variety of accents and perform in a range of styles.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 45 Mark Jenkins
    Director Neil Burger, whose last divergent character was the smart-drugged protagonist of Limitless, allocates more than enough of this overlong movie to details of life and society in future-Chicagoland. But he fails to make any aspect of the premise persuasive.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Jenkins
    If that's the best Hollywood screenwriters can do, maybe they should sign up for a self-help seminar. Nothing focuses the mind like a little firewalking.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Jenkins
    We're supposed to be awed, but a more reasonable response is to giggle. How does a Kevlar tie kill? And if it can, why hasn't the CIA sent a Kevlar scarf to Osama bin Laden?
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Jenkins
    At heart, though, the movie is as tame as "The Belles of St. Trinian's," the 1954 farce that started it all.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Jenkins
    Never before has a movie's direction and script lagged so far behind the actor's hapless persona. If Fraser's character is a human Wile E. Coyote, director Roger Kumble is barely Elmer Fudd.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Jenkins
    What Newell can't seem to do is give Prince of Persia a unifying style, tone or purpose. The film moves well, but doesn't show any motivation other than getting to the next game level.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Jenkins
    This ode to "moving on" from grief packs so little genuine emotion that it will touch only the most susceptible of viewers.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Jenkins
    It's a strange sort of film that casts Gallic tough guy Jean Reno as a clean-fingernailed mogul while employing cross-dressing comic Tyler Perry as a guy capable of hand-to-hand combat with someone called The Butcher of Sligo.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Jenkins
    The newest model of the old submarine-from-hell picture.

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