Matt Zoller Seitz
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For 294 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Matt Zoller Seitz's Scores

Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Game of Thrones: Season 4
Lowest review score: 0 Criminal Minds: Suspect Behavior: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 27 out of 294
294 tv reviews
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Sherlock is a wonderful series. Just thinking about it makes me smile.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Matt Zoller Seitz
    The first four episodes sent out for review become stranger and less “realistic” by the hour, not to mention more stereotypically HBO-like (artfully arranged corpses; drug-thug posturing and handgun-waving; gratuitous T&A) and less concerned with the case that Cohle and Hart are allegedly trying to solve. But the show’s time-shifting structure is so painstaking that even when True Detective spirals into lurid madness there still seems to be purpose behind it.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Matt Zoller Seitz
    This series is Burns doing Guthrie, bringing a lifetime of experience and craft to bear on a story of people struggling through hard times. He's picking up a guitar and telling us a story--a great one.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Even at its worst, Boss radiates intelligence and toughness, and an appreciation of politics as a nonstop performance in an unscripted drama.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Matt Zoller Seitz
    For all its gore, gunfire, and criminal nastiness, it's a joyous show; even when the characters are scowling, the show seems to be grinning at you.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Matt Zoller Seitz
    "Curb" never presents itself as anything but a cleverly plotted, deliberately offensive comedy. But it's more than a comedy: It's a comedy of manners, or bad manners; delightfully rude, and, in its unreal way, honest. [3 Jan 2004]
    • Newark Star-Ledger
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Matt Zoller Seitz
    In its own sweet way, this is a landmark show.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Rick and Morty won't get us any closer to a workable definition of Harmon's genius, but at least it clarifies that the unhinged quality that Community once had wasn't accidental.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Matt Zoller Seitz
    It lets you simultaneously laugh at and with the characters, and feel justified for laughing, then ashamed, and then the pendulum swings back again; this is a much messier and more fascinating set of reactions than what sitcoms typically evoke.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 90 Matt Zoller Seitz
    "The Larry Sanders Show" is the most painful comedy on TV, and I mean that as a compliment. At its best, this half-hour sitcom, set in and around a Los Angeles-based talk show, achieves a sublime level of cruelty. [13 Mar 1998]
    • Newark Star-Ledger
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Matt Zoller Seitz
    The phrase "stream-of- consciousness" doesn't do it justice. Geyser-of-consciousness is more like it. What holds it together is the program's unique comic voice. [12 Sep 1997]
    • Newark Star-Ledger
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Matt Zoller Seitz
    To watch any engrossing drama is to feel for fictional people the way we feel for real-life friends. Even when they piss us off, we wish them the best.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Matt Zoller Seitz
    An earnest, soulful update of the Superman myth. [16 Oct 2001, p.55]
    • Newark Star-Ledger
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Delightful. [8 Nov 2001, p.45]
    • Newark Star-Ledger
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Matt Zoller Seitz
    It believes in the story it's telling and expects everyone watching the series not just to have a good time, but to commit. If every drama series had a tenth as much passion, TV would be a far more interesting place.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Matt Zoller Seitz
    It's these deeper questions [Deciding to live the day-to-day performance of an ideal, a belief, an emotion, a set of principles, a faith?] that give the action and melodrama a bit of existential heft, and redirect our vicarious enjoyment away from fantasy and back towards reality.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Matt Zoller Seitz
    It should still be said, however, that pretty good Burns is pretty great, provided you more or less agree with his take on things.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Matt Zoller Seitz
    The show has a knack for Godfather-style plots and counter­plots, as well as for sixties Hammer-horror violence that doles out gore and suffering strategically: a dollop of blood here, a severed head there. There’s a bracing wantonness to the writers’ inventions here.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Some of the encounters evoke the returned abductees in Close Encounters of the Third Kind, while others have the nasty, bone-deep chill you associate with John Carpenter’s stalk-and-kill classics. Beneath it all is an air of existential dread. The universe is out of order. Life itself has gone haywire.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Matt Zoller Seitz
    NBC's half-hour slice of small-town life isn't perfect right out of the gate; few shows are. But it's so sure-footed and engaging that it would be a pleasure to see how it turns out. [7 Oct 2000, p.43]
    • Newark Star-Ledger
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Matt Zoller Seitz
    What's there is fascinating. More than perhaps anyone writing for TV, Carter understands the tactical value of withholding information; he gives us just enough to pique our interest and then pulls back, promising to deliver more when the time is right. The first installment of Harsh Realm promises plenty. [8 Oct 1999, p.71]
    • Newark Star-Ledger
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Throughout, there’s a sense that ­Community is building, or rebuilding, toward something big and bold--that what you’re seeing is not so much a revamp as a restoration. Few live-action sitcoms are so aware of their artificiality and yet so ­singularly alive.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Matt Zoller Seitz
    The show’s chilled-out confidence (as if it were starting its second season rather than its first) is appealing, and the cast’s Swiss-watch timing makes even lackluster exchanges crackle, but The Michael J. Fox Show’s selling point is its multivalent comic richness.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Nothing in the first few episodes of the new seasons rises to that level of madness [in the first season], but give the show another week or two, and I'm sure it'll get there.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Boss' mix of deft footwork and bull-in-a-china shop clumsiness can be off-putting, but it's always anchored by Grammer's alternately scary and mournful lead performance, and you're never in doubt that there's a fully formed sensibility behind it.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Matt Zoller Seitz
    The problem isn’t the sentiments but the clunky way they’re expressed--as if the writers are reserving the good dialogue for the regulars, along with the empathy.... The missteps are easy to forgive because, in content as well as form, ­Orange is a modestly revolutionary show.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 80 Matt Zoller Seitz
    A welcome surprise - an unabashed melodrama that doesn't wink at the audience but doesn't take itself too seriously, either. Every choice it makes, from pacing to photography to music, seems just about right, and the casting is inspired. (I appreciate that it filled its lead roles with two young men who are somewhat credible on the court.) [23 Sept 2003, p.43]
    • Newark Star-Ledger
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Matt Zoller Seitz
    The cop stuff feels like it could be happening in any other NBC cop show; I kept expecting Prime Suspect's Maria Bello to show up in that cute hat. But given the originality on display, and the venue, those are minor complaints.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Matt Zoller Seitz
    The second season of this faux-reality series about the misadventures of sitcom star Valerie Cherish (Lisa Kudrow) injects the oft-misapplied adjective “uncompromising” with corrosive new life.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Matt Zoller Seitz
    The series tells hard, funny truths about marriage and parenting that often escape notice in other stories - truths which suggest that writer-creator-producer Marc Cherry and his collaborators have actually taken the time to understand the people they're satirizing. [2 Oct 2004]
    • Newark Star-Ledger

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