Matthew Gilbert
Select another critic »
For 807 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Matthew Gilbert's Scores

Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Lost: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Sons Of Hollywood: Season 1
Score distribution:
807 tv reviews
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Matthew Gilbert
    "The Larry Sanders Show" begins its sixth season in top form, with no letup in its steady flow of spot-on sendups and ironic rubs. [13 Mar 1998]
    • Boston Globe
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Matthew Gilbert
    Chase has kept his vision unspoiled despite the torrents of praise, hyperbole, and Emmy nomination that have rained down on his show. Yes, the exhilarating sense of discovery that electrified the first season of "The Sopranos" is gone; the first cut is always the deepest. But last season's revelatory buzz is replaced by a certainty that this show has got legs, that the writing is as comic and edgy as ever, and that Chase has a few new monsters up his sleeve. [14 Jan 2000]
    • Boston Globe
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Matthew Gilbert
    Extraordinary. [2 Mar 2001]
    • Boston Globe
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Matthew Gilbert
    The show is back in magnificent form, with all its humor, psychological thorniness, and bleak tragedy intact. It remains the highest peak of series TV.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Matthew Gilbert
    Riveting, gripping, and altogether compelling ... An innovative and expertly executed hour of suspense, '24' is without question the best premiere of the fall season. [6 Nov 2001]
    • Boston Globe
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Matthew Gilbert
    It is depressing, brilliant, hysterical, excruciating, full of irony, and nothing you'd ever expect to find on American network TV. Rather than sweetening the workplace with fantasies of a home away from home, "The Office" heightens the reality and disconnection of corporate life until it is absurdly funny. The show doesn't touch your heart so much as tickle your spleen. [9 Oct 2003]
    • Boston Globe
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Matthew Gilbert
    It also showcases Milch's taste for complexity when it comes to both the criminal mind and the lawman's motivations. [19 Mar 2004, p.D1]
    • Boston Globe
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Matthew Gilbert
    The future of TV comedy is a sick one, my friends. A gloriously, brilliantly, deliriously sick one, where a desperate housewife wears a "SLUT" T-shirt on a prison visit, a businessman sells prefab homes to Saddam Hussein, and a pudgy teen lusts after his first cousin. It's a ferociously Freudian future, replete with a pent-up mama's boy, a family-run banana stand, and a disbarred psychiatrist who wears cutoffs beneath his underwear because he's a "Never-nude." That's a phobia about nakedness he's trying to make into a nationally recognized condition...In short, it's Arrested Development. [7 Nov 2004, p.N4]
    • Boston Globe
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Matthew Gilbert
    Nip/ Tuck also remains gorgeously sick...The makers of Nip/ Tuck never keep it simple, which is simply excellent. [20 Sept 2005, p.C6]
    • Boston Globe
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Matthew Gilbert
    It's hard to know where to aim the praise first.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Matthew Gilbert
    This is a great piece of TV work... Right from its opening minutes, after a flight to Australia has crashed on the shores of nowhere, ABC's Lost simulates the kind of dread we don't expect to find on the small screen. [22 Sept 2004, p.E1]
    • Boston Globe
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Matthew Gilbert
    Thanks largely to the presence of blowhard-par-excellence Denis Leary, who could be neither self-pitying nor unambiguously heroic if his life or his pack of cigarettes depended on it, it's one of the best series of the year.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Matthew Gilbert
    Amazing. [20 June 2005, p.B7]
    • Boston Globe
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Matthew Gilbert
    The NBC series certainly has been one of TV’s most emotionally honest and stirring works, and it remains so as it enters its fourth season.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Matthew Gilbert
    This extraordinary upstairs-downstairs drama, written by Oscar-winning "Gosford Park" screenwriter Julian Fellowes, is a dramatic, intelligent, soapy, comic, and wise piece of work, one that explores social shifts on the eve of World War I while delivering a remarkably engaging cast of characters.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Matthew Gilbert
    Gabriel Byrne is in every minute of the show, delivering one of TV's most faceted and intriguing performances....All of the new characters promise to engage as their stories and backstories begin to unfold.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Matthew Gilbert
    It offers a great cast, and some very tight, tart scripting. Each of the season's seven half-hours is a little sliver of pleasure.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Matthew Gilbert
    A taut exercise in withheld disaster, Breaking Bad is riveting.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Matthew Gilbert
    Ultimately, though, even with the fantasy, Game of Thrones feels like a historical medieval saga. It's a royal, and royally good, round of musical chairs.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Matthew Gilbert
    Of all the drama pilots I watched, this was my favorite.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 100 Matthew Gilbert
    It's hard to imagine any other comedy series putting such a fitting cap on its run. [21 Oct 2004]
    • Boston Globe
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Matthew Gilbert
    The show doesn't seem to have lost any ballast moving forward from the intensity of season one.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Matthew Gilbert
    The show beautifully depicts a massive game of musical chairs, a world at war with doom ever present just across the border.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Matthew Gilbert
    AMC’s Mad Men returns for season 6 with two hours that are as rich and as deftly literary as anything in the history of the show. The premiere operates like a series of exquisitely written theatrical set pieces, one after another that add up to a moving, ironic, and often comic group portrait.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Matthew Gilbert
    Beautifully written (by Richard LaGravenese) and directed (by Steven Soderbergh), Behind the Candelabra doesn’t quite fit into the biopic genre--simply because it is so good.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Matthew Gilbert
    While The Corner may sound like just more preachy TV cliches about drug abuse and African-American self-destruction, it is so much more than that. It is about the life and death forces at war in that inner-city staple, The Corner, and it is a jarring introduction to the people behind the statistics and the cliches. I hope it finds an audience, despite its rawness. No one ever said great drama had to be pretty. [14 Apr 2000, p.D1]
    • Boston Globe
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Matthew Gilbert
    Back for its fourth season, Louie continues to be TV’s finest oddity.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Matthew Gilbert
    It’s a fantastic return to the story, if you’re in no hurry for action and can admire show creator Ray McKinnon’s quietly fraught set pieces.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Matthew Gilbert
    The acting is extraordinary.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 91 Matthew Gilbert
    I love the suburban satire, which is old territory made fresh again. [Jane] Levy, from "Shameless," is tart and sympathetic, and [Cheryl] Hines is a revelation as a rabidly superficial mom.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Matthew Gilbert
    The script is tight and ambitious, as it attempts to anatomize corruption in the big city.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Matthew Gilbert
    Dern is fantastic as Amy--you cringe as her histrionics drive people away, and cringe again as she tries to suppress her feelings behind a veneer of New Age peacefulness.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 91 Matthew Gilbert
    I don't know if it will catch on - westerns can be a hard sell - but it's another fine AMC choice.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 91 Matthew Gilbert
    Let’s hope it can maintain the joy of the pilot and not fall into broad shtick.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Matthew Gilbert
    This one could take off, especially if the humor doesn’t obscure the layers of Jane’s moral journey.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    Ed has enough potential to qualify as scary. Scary in a "Freaks & Geeks" maybe-I-shouldn't-get-too-attached kind of way. What I mean is that one of this fall's more promising new series is a romantic comedy that NBC seems ready to chuck to the wolves, as it did so tragically to "F&G" last year. [6 Oct 2000, p.D1]
    • Boston Globe
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    A smart, exhilarating, well-written hour that, if anything, is a little naive about the folks who run our nation's most important office. [22 Sept 1999, p.E1]
    • Boston Globe
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    "Malcolm" is an instantly likable series, as it takes conventional TV-family material and gives it a good old-fashioned goose. [7 Jan 2000]
    • Boston Globe
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    Sweet and intelligent...A genre-bender if ever there was one, Roswell takes the "Romeo and Juliet" love story, dresses it in "Rebel Without a Cause" Americana, and then gives the whole thing an "X-Files" twist. The show is a long, long way from "My Favorite Martian" and "Mork & Mindy." [6 Oct 1999, p.E1]
    • Boston Globe
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    Along with its refreshing cast, led by Keri Russell, the WB's Felicity is blessed with a sweet realism that captures the emotional roller coaster that is freshman year in college. It also offers an appealingly non-gritty look at New York City, as seen through the eyes of optimism and innocence...The show transcends formula by staying steadily focused on its characters' shifting emotional realities, and by avoiding the issue-of-the-week plot twists of a series like "Beverly Hills 90210." [29 Sept 1998, p.C1]
    • Boston Globe
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    No, The Sopranos is not the equal of Scorsese's masterpiece ["Goodfellas"], but it manages to bring a new spin to the words "dysfunctional" and "family," and it deserves its place alongside other HBO gems like "The Larry Sanders Show" and "Sex and the City." [9 Jan 1999, p.C1]
    • Boston Globe
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    In its own affectionate way, Freaks and Geeks puts a pimple into the TV-ized approach to adolescence. This delightfully observed 1980s-set dramedy is high school as many of us remember it, with Twinkie-pounding bullies and Army-jacket wearing druggies and pale nerds with speech impediments and "Star Trek" fixations. It's high school unplugged, a sort of "Dazed and Confused" for the small screen, and it is one of the fall season's most likable new shows. That NBC has thrown "Freaks and Geeks" into the wilds of Saturday night - it premieres tonight at 8 on Ch. 7 - is only further evidence of network nitwitness. [25 Sept 1999, p.C1]
    • Boston Globe
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    Can Alias work on a weekly basis? While the Alias pilot plunges forward effortlessly, it also leads to some fairly complicated twists involving Sydney's father (Victor Garber) and the nature of her agency. These twists could make future episodes overly layered, or too dependent on backstory. Also, any CIA suspense series, with or without a flashy pilot, faces the challenge of coming up with 20 or so fresh espionage plots each season - no easy task.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    This is cringe comedy at its giddiest best. [2 Jan 2004]
    • Boston Globe
    • 63 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    A wonderful, imaginative mess brimming with possibility. About a dysfunctional family of space cowboys, the sci-fi series arrives not fully formed, like an elaborate photo that's still clarifying in developing fluid. While many shows burst onto the scene with slick pilots and quickly deteriorate into mediocrity, I'm thinking Firefly is on the opposite creative journey.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    It's an extraordinarily appealing series, one that's so much more than its easy label as a teen private-eye series. [22 Sept 2004, p.D12]
    • Boston Globe
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    Rescue Me isn't for everyone, particularly those who find Leary's fuming a little too convincing. But it's certainly a TV gem, rough but gleaming. [30 May 2006, p.E1]
    • Boston Globe
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    The NBC sitcom is so unpretentious and original, it will probably win you over on its own sweet merits.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    'Extras" is far less terminally existential than ''The Office," less depressing to watch.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    The new layout of the action - Coach Eric Taylor lives in Austin, coaching college football, while Tami Taylor is at home in Dillon on maternity leave - doesn't make the story any less cohesive or satisfying. [5 Oct 2007, p.D2]
    • Boston Globe
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    Fiendishly excellent.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    From the brilliant performance by Michael C. Hall to the dryly witty scripting, Dexter secures a position near the top of another year's best list.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    Dexter is a masterfully creepy-funny serial-killer series, and it continues to both frighten and amuse as it enters its fifth season.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    This season as much as last, In Treatment brings us into more intimacy with its characters than almost any other series on TV.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    A really extraordinary new drama.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    Mad Men returns for season 2 in excellent form: There's a rich and active subtext in this series, you just have to discover it.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    Mad Men remains TV at its most artful. Like Don Draper, it's beautiful, stealthy, troubling, and, above all, addictive.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    When people ask me to recommend good TV, they never seem to have heard about it. Yup, Breaking Bad is that series.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    This knockout adaptation of the Lorraine Hansberry play is a model of both the pure power of stage acting and TV’s potential to bring us up close to that acting without deadening it.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    HBO's Generation Kill is remarkable.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    The writing remains remarkable, as it toggles between the rhythms and cliches of 1950s movies and the timeless resonance of mid-20th-century theater. You rarely find such economical and evocative scripting on TV.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    Beyond the formulaic outline, White Collar, is actually one of the best new shows of the season.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    This is the kind of TV that viewers ask for but rarely get, driven by characters who are more than the sum of one or two qualities and who harbor depths that are revealed slowly, subtly, and authentically.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    The show isn't easy to warm up to, to be honest; it's draped in--and at times stifled by--meticulous period detail and too-perfect lighting, especially in Scorsese's premiere. But in episode two, the characters and the script begin to prevail, and the drama becomes more emotionally distinct and fascinating.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    There may be a smaller number of top-notch newbies this season, but Raising Hope, a celebration of parenthood and childhood, of small joys and big struggles, is certainly one of them.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    [The] sentimental streak in the show is compensated by Frank's coldness and the scrappy urban realism, translated so effectively from the British original.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    Based on the first three episodes, I'm thinking season 2 is going to be even better and certainly more consistent.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    The Killing quickly hooks you with its steadily unfolding story line. Created by Veena Sud, based on a Danish TV hit named "Forbrydelsen," the show draws you into the tragedy of the crime, and then makes you crave its solution.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    With none of the conventional plot techniques TV viewers are accustomed to, it is a collection of rich moments and poignant characters that loosely adds up to something quite powerful.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    With season two, the drama has fully come to life, with moments of savagery, hypocrisy, and bittersweet loyalty that make it a must-see show.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    The Hour is not "Breaking Bad" good, or "Mad Men" good, but it's close.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    The unfolding of the Parade’s End narrative has been directed (by Susanna White) and written to challenge--sometimes too much so. While you always understand the connections among the characters on “Downton,” you have to piece them together yourself in Parade’s End.... It’s the kind of demanding storytelling that differentiates “The Wire” from most other crime series.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    The first few episodes of this import promise no slack--and plenty of poignancy--as the story line moves closer to the truth of the matter.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    It’s not as meticulous, cinematic, or original as those two shows ["Mad Men" and "Breaking Bad"], but it’s got the same kind of storytelling ambition. It’s the most vital new series of the year so far.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    Orange Is the New Black is a funny, dramatically sound, poignant, and thoroughly addictive adventure through a bleak looking glass.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    Unlike the majority of today's youth-market vehicles, Undeclared has been put together with a refreshing lack of cynicism (as well as a refreshing lack of laugh track). [25 Sept 2001, p.E1]
    • Boston Globe
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    The story of the plague has been told before, and it will and should continue to find new life. But The Normal Heart tells it with admirable honesty and plenty of emotion.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    Created by Mike Judge, it does for techies, venture capitalists, and tech-biz campuses what Judge’s film “Office Space” did for cubicle dwellers, their bosses, and office parks back in 1999.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    It’s a promising reentry. All the major themes, so subtly articulated across the first six seasons, are coming to a head.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    The Knick is an astonishing new medical drama that has the potential to be one of the year’s best and most talked-about shows, as well as a breakthrough into TV series excellence for its star, Clive Owen, and its director and executive producer, Steven Soderbergh.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    Right in the first episode, the relationships are well lived-in, the writing is honest and bound up with the actors, the tone effortlessly embodies drama, comedy, and life’s absurdities, the contemporary homes and locations click, and the ensemble acting is filled with little moments and jewels.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 83 Matthew Gilbert
    As a weekly series, the effects need to remain impressive and the writers need to avoid falling into "Lost" and "Walking Dead" band-of-survivors rehash.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 83 Matthew Gilbert
    This is a classic guilty pleasure, with campy twists and a fabulously diva-esque performance by Stowe.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 83 Matthew Gilbert
    After the forced opening minutes, it's the best multi-cam-com of the season.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 83 Matthew Gilbert
    The tone tips awkwardly between crude and romantic, and a little of Azaria goes a long way. But I'm game for episode 2.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Matthew Gilbert
    All the potential here is in the show’s resistance to the joyless atmospherics that have become the bane of comic-book shows and movies.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Angel the WB's new child of "Buffy," is no ordinary spinoff, and it has the potential to become a witty hour of unearthly allegory in its own right. If it can maintain a sense of humor about itself, Angel, which stars David Boreanaz as Buffy's brooding former beau, may become one of those rare spinoffs that isn't merely a flat-out cash-in. [5 Oct 1999, p.D1]
    • Boston Globe
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    If you're looking for sexual tension amid the laugh track, or social and political point-making between the punchlines, then "Will & Grace" may not work for you. It's a sitcom that has the potential to prove to prime time that attractions between adults are not always rooted in lust. [21 Sep 1998]
    • Boston Globe
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The bottom line is that "Ally McBeal" features wonderfully provocative scripts that are as clever as they are wise; supporting actors who are the definitive opposite of stock; and a carefully struck tone that balances the fantastic, the romantic, the sardonic, and the sincere. It is a uniquely imagined TV series that, with producer/writer David E. Kelley as the engine behind it, goes further than ever seemed possible. [14 Sep 1998]
    • Boston Globe
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    But the real question is: Will Dharma & Greg be able to expand its central, single joke into an entire series? An entertaining premiere, yes, but there may be a finite number of laughs to be had over those wacky hippies and the cold-hearted WASPs. [24 Sept 1997, p.C6]
    • Boston Globe
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    A surprisingly promising hour that could become something special if it doesn't cop out and decide to become a hipped-up "Beverly Hills 90210." [29 Sept 1999, p.F10]
    • Boston Globe
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    This kind of material would wear thin after a while if the characters weren't as distinct and endearing as they are. [30 Apr 2005]
    • Boston Globe
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    A surprisingly stylish adaptation of a story that would seem to be played out after so many incarnations on the small and big screens. If Smallville can keep its supernatural plots engaging, and avoid focusing solely on Clark Kent's familiar teen alienation, it could evolve into a top-tier WB series. [16 Oct 2001, p.D16]
    • Boston Globe
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Compared to the grittier British version, the American Queer as Folk has a sweet, romanticized aura. At times, it even recalls the TV adaptation of "Tales of the City." The script has plenty of conflict, and the sexuality is hard-core, but the show also exudes an ensemble coziness and jokiness that finds the gang gathering regularly for late-night snacks at Debbie's diner. [1 Dec 2000, p.F1]
    • Boston Globe
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    As with most HBO series, "Curb Your Enthusiasm" isn't for everyone. Prerequisites include not only a desire for more of the best of "Seinfeld" but a willingness to go along with David's Brooklyn-bred grumpiness. [13 Oct 2000]
    • Boston Globe
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Based on the first two episodes of season two, "24" returns tonight with the promise of another year of ambitious, outrageous, and addictive TV drama. [29 Oct 2002]
    • Boston Globe
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The show seems to have a light step this season without the heavy-duty silliness of Kim ... And it is refreshing to see many new faces at CTU. [8 Jan 2005]
    • Boston Globe
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    ''24" is still an addictive amusement park ride of a show.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Project Greenlight distinguishes itself with its surprisingly warts-and-all approach. As it progresses, we get to see the sort of naked-ego shots and bottom-line talk you'd expect Miramax and its mob to have kept under wraps. [30 Nov 2001, p.D1]
    • Boston Globe
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The Wire is a cop drama from top to bottom. It does take a systemic view of the issue, like "Traffic," Steven Soderbergh's drug-trade saga. But it never sacrifices drama and character for lecture. [31 May 2002, p.E14]
    • Boston Globe
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Why watch The Wire if it's such tough-going--so difficult to follow and then, once followed, so pessimistic? Because it offers the kind of earned understanding that leads to progress.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    One of the pluses of Karen Sisco is that, true to Leonard's fiction, the fugitives Karen tracks are more than generic baddies. [1 Oct 2003, p.G1]
    • Boston Globe
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The shamelessness of Nip/Tuck returns intact, which is a good thing.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Of the 36 new network shows premiering this fall, Las Vegas is among the more promising. [22 Sept 2003, p.B7]
    • Boston Globe
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Like "Lost," it has the potential to grow into a cross-genre drama that reaches beyond cultiness to all kinds of TV viewers.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The entire series... has been amped up this time around. It's all gotten a little more Hollywood, even if it's as ensconced as ever in the plush offices and dramatic skyscrapers of New York. [9 Sep 2004]
    • Boston Globe
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    What a treat it is to find a medical show that doesn't turn its talented MDs into bedside saints in order to calm viewers' fears about mechanical HMO factories.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    No, it's not "groundbreaking," as HBO calls its programming. And I doubt it will give the ratings-slipping channel its much-needed hit. But it will probably find a small, loyal, "Deadwood"-size audience that enjoys a good serial melodrama charged up by a villainess named Atia who turns mothering into something akin to pimping. [26 Aug 2005, p.D1]
    • Boston Globe
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    So much of the pleasure of Lost is in the way surprise twists arrive completely out of the blue.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The feverish action is as tantalizing as ever, and so is the script.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The FX drama returns for its fifth season tonight at 10, after a 19-month absence, and it returns to its former glory after an unfortunate fourth-season slump.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Unique, fresh, and quite entertaining. [1 Oct 2004]
    • Boston Globe
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    ''Big Love,"... is layered enough to do what HBO's ''The Sopranos" and ''Six Feet Under" have done so well: make atypical heroes knowable and universal. It pulls us into its parallel moral universe, rather than keep us standing outside in judgment.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    "The Boondocks" takes on racism the way ''All in the Family" did, by sending up ignorance and extremism rather than moralizing about them.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    An eerie -- and excellent -- new series that makes ''24" look more than ever like a broadly drawn comic strip.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The action is intense in "Sleeper Cell," and each episode includes at least one stunning moment of violence or betrayal. But character depth isn't sacrificed to keep the pace moving, and there are valuable calms between the storms.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    If the show can stay as gripping as its premiere... it will be a welcome new prime-time puzzle.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    It's funny, but painfully funny, as it skewers the world of banal sitcoms and youth-market mania. It's mean, but touching, too, as Kudrow's Valerie undergoes the humiliations of being a Nixed Big Thing. [3 June 2005, p.D1]
    • Boston Globe
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Like ''Lost"... the mystery is provocatively open-ended and, assuming the writing continues to be good, absorbing.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The nonfictional veneer feels authentic, and so does Lilley's talent.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    [It] passes quickly but gleefully.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Like ''Friends," this is not a big-themed series so much as a bunch of little character jokes and relationship confusions getting batted around by an able cast.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    If you're prudish or just polite, in other words, you'll be turned off by all the happy offensiveness. If you're not turned off, though, you may be entertained, as I am. The show is the quintessential slacker comedy. [29 Jun 2006]
    • Boston Globe
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    If Rock and co-creator Ali LeRoi can continue to bring depth to the characters without succumbing to cliche or sentiment, they will be on a promising path.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    One of Colbert's strengths has always been wordplay, which is in full force on ''The Colbert Report" and gives the show an added level of wit.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The best of a recent group of heist dramas, including NBC's "Heist" and FX's "Thief."
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Berg has done a fine job of lifting his series above familiar teen melodrama and making it into a group portrait of a town.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    "Studio 60" is one of the best new dramas of the season, assuming you aren't Sorkin-phobic, and with some tweaking it could be the very best.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Tonight's premiere isn't one of the series' most cleverly wrought scripts; it's more of a welcome-back party than a gem.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    30 Rock returns tonight with its best foot forward.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    When you watch the show, which returns for season two tonight at 10, you'll find a legal thriller that's trashier and more fun than you might have expected.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The ABC show... is one of the pleasures of the new season, although it may strike some viewers as too conceptually loose to love.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    To embrace "Knights," you have to have a taste for the kind of comedy that teases because it loves.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Based on the pilot, [the] mystery promises to be surprising, psychological, and addictive.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Dexter enters season 3 on Sunday at 9 p.m. with an increasing--and pleasing--urge to make us like the curious man-child at its center.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Thankfully, this season Dexter continues to play with our moral bearings, which is the show’s best quality.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    You'll love "The Sarah Silverman Program," but only if, like me, you have a healthy appetite for sick comedy.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Izzard is a great surprise in FX's "The Riches," and just one of this fascinating new series' unexpectedly soulful pleasures.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Dirty Sexy is right on the money.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Tonally, "Private Practice" has not found its sweet spot. Dirty Sexy Money, on the other hand, has. The soap opera fully owns its soapiness.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Pushing Daisies is good, as well as distinctive.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    British actress Lena Headey makes Sarah into the heart and soul of this series. Without Headey and her maternal magnetism, Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles would probably deteriorate into a nonstop series of effects-laden fight scenes that's as cold and grim as NBC's "Bionic Woman" remake.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    If you've been wondering about the art of series-TV writing, and how potent and resonant it truly can be, you need look no further than HBO's extraordinary new In Treatment.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The actor [Lewis], who uses a flawless American accent, makes Life worth a gander. And he is surrounded by a distinctive cast.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    This melodrama isn't high TV art, or even middling; but it's dishy, farcical, and funny, as the willowy Serena (Blake Lively) and her circle prey on one another.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    All the details have color, and so do the characters, right down to Sam's guilt-ridden parents, with whom he still lives. And there are fleeting hints of drama in the scenario that will surely gain momentum and weight.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Never mind the clichés, because Duchovny makes his character worth watching, as he swaggers from bad predicament to bad predicament, pretending not to care about his life anymore.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The impulse to protect his family comes much less naturally to David Duchovny's Hank Moody, the hero of Californication, which returns in top form for its second season.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    They've pulled together a vivid cast and evoked the ideal tone - not comedy, not psychodrama, not sci fi, but an intriguingly evasive blend of them all.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Sookie remains a compelling plucky heroine, undaunted by the violent strangeness of Bill's nighttime world but still holding fast to her moral center.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The show, as fast-paced as ever, is crammed with subplots this season, some of which will be more engaging than others.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Breaking Bad works as an unabashedly bold story about a man in extremis, told with the iconographic and ironic sensibility of Quentin Tarantino.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The emotional strains of keeping her secret from Ben (Iddo Goldberg) grow across the eight episodes and lend the season an unexpected poignancy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The beautifully filmed half-hour comedy, lets Ullman clown around with her face and her voices and her wigs without confining her to too much story line.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    It is reverent enough, and profoundly heroic; and yet it is a living, breathing piece of work that brings American history down to earth.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    I do think it has real potential to become a solid dramatic addition to the FX slate, as The Shield enters its final season.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Even when Leverage flirts with serious issues, including the mistreatment of an Army reservist who is shot in Iraq by a private contractor, the dramatic tone is whimsical and tongue in cheek. This motley crew is a kind of guerilla comedy troupe that can pick pockets and empty bank accounts, too.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    You don't like comedy that pushes the boundaries of good taste, you have no business here. But the material is presented with enough comic skill, cultural resonance, and clever mockery to rise above.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    I was surprised at how much adrenalized horror there is to be found in the story, as it races forward into bloody human-zombie battles and scary entrapments. This isn't a wink-winkfest so much as a sly screamfest, with lots of post-apocalyptic misery and carnage afoot.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Mazzello and Dale both add to the humanity of The Pacific with their committed performances, even when the disorienting narrative seems to be working against them.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    All the performances are rough and under-rehearsed, which makes them appealing. Costello also keeps the atmosphere relaxed during the interviews, never seeming too eager to interject his own commentary or jokes.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Collision is a satisfying emotional journey through the twists, turns, and overpasses of a dozen or so lives.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The filmmakers deliver a fine balance of both elated big-gun worship and humiliated bathroom cleaning, melting-pot team-making and the cliquishness of ethnic groups.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    HBO sent out three advance episodes of Bored to Death, and by the third one (also the best one) I felt confident that Schwartzman was exactly where he belongs--in Brooklyn, in a cafe, watching, and worrying.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    It’s a remarkable performance in its straightforward simplicity; she’s like a feral animal ferociously protecting her secrets.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    No gold mine of symbolism is worth a damn when the show itself doesn’t have good old storytelling mojo behind it. And, based on the premiere, V has enough narrative drive and character definition to pull viewers into the creepy suspense of its dystopian world.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    All of the characters are misfits, and the pleasure of Party Down is watching the actors riff off one another as they go to extremes.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Truly there can be something rich and lovely about hospitals, and there is something rich and lovely about Boston Med.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The abundance of material plays out naturally, in a nicely arranged script by John Pielmeier that leans heavily on the R-rated soap side of things. You'll probably get lost in the high melodrama while watching this massive chess game, where the pawns are as prominent as the bishops, the king, and the queen.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    They make an appealing team, and it doesn't hurt that they're chasing bad guys through the breathtaking--and HDTV-ready--beauty of Hawaii. There's nothing groundbreaking going on here, just old-fashioned action-adventure fun. New old-fashioned fun, that is.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    A strange, fascinating, and sometimes brilliant contemporary take on the father of forensic crime-solving.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    It's not too early, however, to heap praise onto this astute, well-written show and its many specific wonders.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The show works, in its own hokey, feel-good, alt-soundtrack way.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    I like Archer because it succeeds where so many of the snarky animated series tend to fail. Reed and his writers and voice actors balance all the pop satire and raunch with a strong sense of the characters.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Olyphant creates a sense of suspended time whenever Raylan comes into contact with thugs--as if a gun standoff isn't so far from standing at a bar with a drink in hand. His Raylan is the kind of guy who doesn't say much, but gives us plenty to talk about.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    If you enjoy slowly piecing together a puzzle without having first seen the final image, Rubicon is right up your alley; if not, the brainteasing will likely unnerve you.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The plots are really secondary to the show's winning, easy-going style and its bittersweet tone. This isn't John Cassavetes, but there's something of the director's spaciously paced, slightly improvised technique about the way the men on the show interact as they take their regular hikes and breakfast at the diner.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Every so often, a show arrives and instantly feels lived-in, like a comfortable old couch with slight depressions in all the right places. FX's Terriers is one of those shows, beautifully torn and frayed from the get-go.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    What I like about Lone Star, what could make it the strongest TV newcomer of the season, is the ways in which it differs from classic nighttime melodramas. The show is as much a bittersweet character study of con man Bob Allen as it is a new spin on the Ewings.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The Walking Dead may depend more on suspense, desolate atmosphere, and creative storytelling than fine acting. The show takes a nightmare generally told in movies and opens it up for the medium of TV. I'm optimistic that Darabont & Co. will continue to find ways to make the characters interestingly human as they dodge death's slow, ruthless pursuit.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Linney and this role were made for each other. There are a few problems with The Big C. Occasionally, the tone veers off course into forced comic absurdity. But my cavils are irrelevant in the face of Linney's extraordinary work.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The series is animated mostly by the perfectly legitimate reason of invoking sheer wonder, but the scientific episode gives a fascinating glimpse of what scientists still have to learn from these creatures.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    While it's not the triumph that "Downton" was, it's a special, lovely miniseries that lingers in your imagination like a richly drawn memoir.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The show is an intelligent addition to the Fox lineup, with both the broad canvas of "The Wire" and the street procedural of "NYPD Blue" in its DNA.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The story of Patrick "Lights" Leary is engrossing from the first bell, with nicely developed plots and psychological twists that transcend the genre cliches of the boxing drama. And the acting is strong where it matters.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Too often, TV's sci-fi creators fail to give us characters to identify with, focusing instead on special effects and plot manipulations. But the father-son-bond material in Falling Skies brings humanity to the story and grounds it in emotion rather than spectacle.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    With this bracing and comic new set of 12 episodes, Nurse Jackie has evolved into a rigorous, fascinating portrait of denial, of how it works when someone deceives herself and everyone around her
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    It's witty, irreverent, and joyously juvenile.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    There are a few revelations in this rich adaptation, concisely written for the screen by Lucinda Coxon.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    A finely constructed docu-dramatic piece, Cinema Verite folds together the stories of the Louds of Santa Barbara and the PBS filmmakers who took over their home, and it adds in both real and expertly re-created footage from the 12 episodes of "An American Family."
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    It's both dramatic and unique, from the sometimes graphic material about his double mastectomy to his self-revelation in the media limelight.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    I promise you will roll your eyes at least once. And yet, each hour is so spellbinding, you may not realize you're leaving grip marks on your couch.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The story line is expertly structured, especially after the first hour's exposition, as potential explanations emerge and the pieces begin to fit together. And the writers maintain an all-important sense of humor, not just with the one-liners among the team members but with shrewd social satire.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Still, even if Curb has lost some of its original wallop, it remains a great comedy of manners.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    It offers amusement and a tad of suspense, but little to ponder over the long run.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    There's no false modesty here, just a level-headed look back as Belafonte recalls decades of music, family, and activism, but mostly activism.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Despite the blood and the labor, Call the Midwife is filled with heart.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Nashville falls somewhere in between the two extremes, a story that thrives on heightened melodrama and big twists but gives its characters more depth than you generally find in network lather-fests.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    For a new series, Sports Night already has a nicely developed sense of ensemble and texture. Charles and Krause show a natural chemistry as anchors and friends, and Robert Guillaume has strong presence as the imposing executive producer. The most appealing actor, though, is Huffman, who is dynamic as the committed producer who lives only for airtime. She's got caffeine running through her veins. [22 Sept 1998, p.C1]
    • Boston Globe
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    It's a nicely assembled, topical film that gives us both a sweeping view of gay rights across almost 30 years, as well as an intimate look at an extraordinary person swept up in those times.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    In the first four new episodes, her characters remain in their self-contained cultural warp, still only just beginning to mingle with hipsters and hard drugs and cold, careering artists, and, yes, black people.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    All of the material crammed into tonight's episode is both intriguing and tensely directed (by Martin Campbell, "Casino Royale"), raising a host of strong possibilities for the show's future.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Those [dialogue] imperfections never jolted me out of the spell Copper casts.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Despite the occasional artificial reality flourish, Catfish: The TV Show is a timely, engaging, and often poignant addition to MTV's lineup.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    It's a more visceral impression of a band on fire, and as such it offers plenty of satisfaction.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    It's beautifully filmed in and around Washington, D.C., it's well-acted, and it's cleverly written by Beau Willimon.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    By episode 2, though, after the crammed (and super-sized) premiere, [creator] Weisberg reveals a sure sense of detail that bodes well for the future of the series.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The series is gripping, nicely styled, and smartly written, with a solid leading performance by Matthew Macfadyen as Inspector Edmund Reid, the head of H Division.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The show has a scruffy, adolescent sweetness with a seeming insensitivity to people with physical disabilities that ultimately feels quite sensitive.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    After the forced setup, evolves into a rich portrait of hard lives and the possibility of healing. By episode 3, the miniseries feels like a smart crime novel, steeped in very specific locales and individuals.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Orphan Black has the potential to be memorable entertainment, if they [creators Graeme Manson and John Fawcett] can continue to deliver each and every plot development with a human touch.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    It’s a bit of a rarity, an intimate, sprawling, and at times touching procedural that makes the networks’ versions of the genre look like simple board games.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    It’s honest, credible, trustworthy storytelling.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    It’s thoroughly transporting.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    It’s such a lovely thing--Cher helping her mother realize her dream after all these years--that I was able to let go of the special’s ulterior motive.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    As with a number of moments in the completely enjoyable Family Tree, I’m not sure how the actors kept themselves from laughing.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The show unfolds like a rich, gritty, and addictive novel, with some surprising detours and lots of transporting, grainy imagery.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    While there’s something vintage about the show, as it follows in the footsteps of “Barney Miller,” it’s also got fresh twists that firmly place it in the now. Braugher anchors Samberg’s performance, and indeed he anchors the whole show.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    It’s an inviting, beautifully acted, and smartly written period drama set in the 1950s
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey is certainly trippy and visually dazzling, but it’s also a big-thought-provoking series crammed with scientific and historical fact. Hosted by astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, it is a transporting mass of CGI special effects and cartoon sequences, but it has the heft and scope of cable’s most esteemed science series, “Planet Earth” and “Life.”
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Weird and jagged, inventive and energetic, Orphan Black is a small blessing. While Hollywood is busy cloning, this show about clones is a singular pleasure.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Occasionally, logic is forsaken. But still The Escape Artist maintains its suspense despite the flaws, thanks to rich acting and smart direction.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The rebooted Homeland promises to be an engaging, streamlined CIA thriller with a few big ideas about America and the war on terrorism.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The show, based on the novel by Elmore Leonard, brings us some of the nuttiest backwoods characters since Sheriff Harry S. Truman and Agent Dale Cooper looked into the murder of Laura Palmer. [4 Aug 1998, p.E1]
    • Boston Globe
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Mr. Dynamite isn’t hagiography, and we hear enough about Brown’s personal flaws to make him quite human.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Everything else about A Poet in New York, which is timed to air alongside the centennial of Thomas’s birth, is small and underwhelming. That sounds like a damning complaint, but the limits of the script, by Andrew Davies, actually benefit Hollander’s performance to some extent.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Matthew Gilbert
    The romance and the attractively stylized innocence of the era is addictive, but the espionage plot, with its link to political history, is absurd.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Matthew Gilbert
    This is a million miles from PBS and Mirren, but it works because of Bello's visceral energy.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Matthew Gilbert
    I want to be [hooked], because the actors are so charismatic. Remember Ehle with Colin Firth in PBS's 1995 "Pride & Prejudice"? But the New Agey ghost-as-conscience thing--done better with so much crazy verve in the hallucinatory "Eli Stone"--is strained by the end of the first episode
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Matthew Gilbert
    The cast is appealing, despite Bakula’s questionable accent.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Matthew Gilbert
    It does break your heart, to some extent, if you’re willing to let go of your cynicism for an hour.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Matthew Gilbert
    The pilot so closely resembles the original, it renders the endeavor redundant.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Matthew Gilbert
    It's not quite the revelation that "The Simpsons" was, but "Futurama" contains enough inventiveness and heart to make it a worthy follow-up. [26 Mar 1999]
    • Boston Globe
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Matthew Gilbert
    Does it work? Mostly, but only if you can handle what is now commonly called "edge." [29 Jan 1999]
    • Boston Globe
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Matthew Gilbert
    Almost none of the characters is particularly likable - unless he or she is angling for something. What's refreshing about Sex and the City is that it pushes to a darkly comic extreme the situations that already fuel the many urban-singles sitcoms on network TV, particularly those with female leads like "Suddenly Susan" and "Caroline in the City." More social satire than sitcom, it looks openly at relationships steeped in ambivalence, fear, and the games people play. [6 Jun 1998, p.C6]
    • Boston Globe