Michael Phillips

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For 1,816 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 57% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Michael Phillips' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Greenberg
Lowest review score: 0 Hostel: Part II
Score distribution:
1816 movie reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Michael Phillips
    We need films such as Kennedy's as a corrective.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Michael Phillips
    Any film with Jennifer Ehle, perfect as the tightly wound but loving therapist, tends to be worth seeing in the first place.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Michael Phillips
    "All right" doesn't begin to describe it. The Kids Are All Right is wonderful. Here is a film that respects and enjoys all of its characters, the give-and-take and recklessness and wisdom of any functioning family unit, conventional or un-.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Michael Phillips
    The cave exists to provoke awe in mere mortals. The camera pauses at one point to take in a stalagmite reaching up to touch, nearly, a stalactite and the inevitable association is with Michelangelo's Adam and the hand of God.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Michael Phillips
    The grace, elegance, carefully muted color palette and gradual acknowledgment of life's milestones lift The Red Turtle far above the average so-called "family-friendly" animation.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Michael Phillips
    From a terrible epidemic comes a beautiful documentary.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Michael Phillips
    Deliver Us From Evil has a few things wrong with it, including an egregious musical score, but without resorting to sucker punches, it takes your breath away while making your skin crawl.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Michael Phillips
    It's a beauty, all right. It's more a style show than a deep philosophical treatise, but with surfaces this sleek and faces this interesting, I'll take style over substance any day.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Michael Phillips
    The Big Sick has the confidence to let the audience come to Nanjiani and Gordon's fictionalized real-life situation, rather than yank us in, kicking and screaming.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Michael Phillips
    In the populist vein of Ron Howard's "Apollo 13," Affleck's rouser salutes the Americans (and, more offhandedly, the Canadians) who restored our sense of can-do spirit when we needed it.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Michael Phillips
    The Master is brilliantly, wholly itself for a little more than half of its 137 minutes. Then it chases its own tail a bit and settles for being merely a fascinating metaphoric father-son relationship reaching endgame. It may not all "work," but most of it's remarkable.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Michael Phillips
    A gem made by a filmmaker who loves life, and knows how to capture its ebb and flow and sweet complication.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Michael Phillips
    This is the most satisfying thriller of the year, capping the Bourne trilogy.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Michael Phillips
    Here's what I most appreciate about Shannon's work with the writer-director Jeff Nichols: the subtlety.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Michael Phillips
    The acting is wonderful throughout, but Alidoosti creates an especially haunting depiction of one woman's adversities in a country, and a marriage, that may not have her best interests at heart.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Michael Phillips
    Amy
    Amy stays above the tabloid fray, up to a point. Kapadia hasn't made a groundbreaking documentary; it's more like a classy, high-end edition of "Behind the Music."
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    It's a vivid ensemble experience, and the acting is wonderful.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Michael Phillips
    It's an uncompromising drama, not easy to watch. And it is one of the year's highlights.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Michael Phillips
    The brilliantly untrustworthy documentary Exit Through the Gift Shop reminds us that a film can start out in one direction and then change course so radically, it becomes an act of provocation unto itself.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Michael Phillips
    Knocked Up is more verbally adroit than it is visually. But Apatow's awfully sharp as a chronicler of contemporary romantic anxieties.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The Departed exists in a movie-place about as far from personal statements as a storied director can get. Maybe those days for Scorsese are long gone. But Scorsese's sense of craft remains sure.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Michael Phillips
    The film version of “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” came out in the year in which An Education is set, and beyond the hairstyles, there’s something of the willful, gleeful Golightly reinvention expert about Jenny.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Michael Phillips
    This is one of the finest achievements of the year, and while it's easy to lose your way in the labyrinth, I don't think Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy is most interesting for its narrative pretzels. Rather, it's about what this sort of life does to the average human soul.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Michael Phillips
    No halves about it: Half Nelson is a wholly absorbing and delicately shaded portrait of an educator played by Ryan Gosling, a young man harboring an offstage secret.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Michael Phillips
    The Sun sheds only so much literal light on its chosen subject; it's a film of shadows and silence, the calm before and after the storm. But everything you see and hear carries weight and an eerie poetic undercurrent.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Michael Phillips
    The miracle is that even with a bit of dramaturgical clunkiness The Past is fluid, intimate cinema. Few directors today can shoot in such tightly confined spaces, with such a determined control over his actors' movements, and make the drama work so well.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Michael Phillips
    Hampton and Wright have been more than sensible when it comes to Atonement. They’ve responded intuitively to a tale that is half art and half potboiler, like so many stories worth telling.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Michael Phillips
    This may be the most overtly Christian mainstream picture since "The Passion of the Christ." Unlike that one, though, Malick's comes with a generosity of spirit large enough to get all sorts of people (including non-believers) thinking about the nature of faith and what it's all about.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Michael Phillips
    It's unlike any other war film, in any language.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Michael Phillips
    The tone of The Host is slippery in the best way; you're never sure if you're in for a joke or a shock, yet nothing feels random.

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