Michael Phillips

Select another critic »
For 1,767 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 57% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Michael Phillips' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Sugar
Lowest review score: 0 A Good Old Fashioned Orgy
Score distribution:
1767 movie reviews
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The movie overall is engaging, though it's more cavalier regarding story and relentless in its action than its predecessor.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Frost/Nixon is wholly absorbing.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    See it; see those three performers go to town.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Sleek and, until a stupidly violent climax, very entertaining, Unknown is the opposite of "Memento."
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The actors are excellent. Rogen falls very comfortably into the role of a 29-year-old who has fallen very comfortably into a living thing - a marriage - and stopped working on it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The very antonym of "fun," writer-director Craig Zobel's new film Compliance is one of the toughest sits of the movie year 2012. But it's an uncompromising and, in its way, honorable drama built upon a prank call that goes on and on.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    With its one-of-a-kind poetic lamentation, Young's voice sounds more peculiarly lovely than ever. A small picture, but good and true.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    It's refreshing to see a non-mainstream movie that wears its heart and lust on its sleeve, and has anything but violence on its mind.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The issues at play in Mustang are gravely serious but the tone and rhythm is brisk, headlong and intelligently lively, like the women at the center.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Like "Control," the recent Anton Corbijn treatment of rock star Ian Curtis' short life, the powerful British drama Boy A announces its gravitas with a look--organically achieved, with cinematography, production design and direction working together--you are meant to notice.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Think Like a Man is what it is. But its hangout factor is considerable, because the actors' charms are considerable.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The fetching comedy Priceless”(“Hors de Prix”) weighs about as much as its star, Audrey Tautou, but like Tautou’s pleasingly craven heroine it knows exactly what it’s doing.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Davis is reason No. 1 the film extracted from Kathryn Stockett's 2009 best-seller improves on its source material.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Breathlessly paced bordering on manic, but propulsively entertaining.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    In this teen-boy universe, sex is everywhere and nowhere, it's oozing out of every pop culture pore and every other insane boast, yet the idea of figuring out how to talk to girls without turning into a yutz remains elusive.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Cleverly structured, Horrible Bosses works in spite of its cruder, scrotum-centric instincts.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The Book of Eli works, even if the preservation of Christianity isn’t high on your personal post-apocalypse bucket list. Establishing its storytelling rules clearly and well, the film simply is better, and better-acted, than the average end-of-the-world fairy tale.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Several aspects of Weiner, from Jeff Beal's sardonic music (interpolating, among other cues, the theme from "S.W.A.T.") to the shock-cut editing strategies, nudge the movie toward entertaining if facile mockery mixed with just enough empathy to prevent curdling. It's pretty irresistible viewing, though, which is a pretty sad thing to concede.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    I appreciate Haynes’ craft and ambition. I love the Ledger/Gainsbourg scenes, which are sweet and sad and delicately shaded. And Blanchett’s inspired not-quite-impersonation of Dylan is reason enough to tussle with the rest of it.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    A strong, blood-boiling documentary from director Amy Berg, who made the similarly fine "Deliver Us From Evil".
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    If you’re new to the Dardennes, Lorna’s Silence will serve as a fine introduction.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Berg sticks to the job at hand, imagining what it is was like to be there, and to be the victim of sloppy, deadly safety practices in the name of a good day on Wall Street.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Liman's sensibility isn't sophisticated enough to tease out the nuances of what must be a pretty interesting marriage; the movie is more about texture and surfaces and surface tensions.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Coppola and her brilliant cinematographer, Harris Savides, keep the action simple, but the perspective is perfect.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The film is entertaining and disingenuous, which doesn't make it wrong.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    It's closer to the hammering "Transformers" aesthetic than expected. Yet the weirdness around the edges saves it from impersonality.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The creator of the original "Mad Max" trilogy has whipped up a gargantuan grunge symphony of vehicular mayhem that makes "Furious 7" look like "Curious George."
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Ever since she took "The Grifters" by storm, Bening has been a spectacular if often ill-used actress. Here, it's a marvelous fit of performer and role, and she makes Dorothea a dozen things at once: warm, chilly, open, wary, worldly, insecure, grave, blithe.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Sollett works easily and well with Cera and Dennings, and lends a touch of awkward realism to what, from a screenwriting perspective, is pure formula.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    If the film is more solid and satisfying than terrific, so be it.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Sweet and flinty in roughly equal measure, the movie's a big hit in its native country.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    It's a fascinating bundle of contradictions -- authentic in a million details, deeply romanticized in others. Cool, calm and collected, this is more love story than gangster picture.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The film is distinguished by the grubby velocity of his foot chases, and the effectiveness of its craft.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Delpy has always challenged Hawke to find a simpler, more direct form of acting in Linklater's films, which gives them their unique suspense and rolling tension.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The performances reveal precisely what Rivette wants to reveal, which is to say, in conventional psychological terms, not a great deal.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    By design, the dialogue from the (fictional) play comments directly on the central, shifting power relationship in the film, sometimes elegantly, sometimes a little awkwardly.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The film works best when it pays specific attention to how hard it is to write a rhyme worth hearing.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Nothing elegant about Adams here, but she's terrific -- a sparkling screen presence. Her Earhart hoists this big-budget sequel above the routine.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The film, a sleek and oddly moving study in the cost of debauchery, has its gleeful excesses.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    It's still worth seeing. This ambitious and powerful sphinx, a major force in a particular chunk of recent history, may not give away much. Watching and listening to how he doesn't give it away — that's the known known here.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Part "Law & Order" morality play, part "Wall Street" with a dash of the more recent and topically pertinent "Margin Call," Arbitrage hums along, complicating its narrative without tying itself in knots.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Smith carries it, even after the story loses its nerve. This film is the opposite of “Transformers”: It’s all about the unsettling silence, not the noise.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The plot's the same old thing. Mad, mad, mad, mad science; imminent apocalypse; parent/child issues; blah blah blaggidy blah. The tone of Ant-Man, however, is relatively light and predominantly comic.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Not everyone can act his material with ease. But Ejiofor, who brings a serene gravity to every exchange, was born to do Mamet.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    With Rooney Mara as the woman in question — a poised, tense Manhattanite prescribed anti-anxiety medication by her psychiatrist with newsworthy results — Side Effects finds its ideal performer.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The film's surprising, enveloping jazz score is often deliberately at odds with Niko's moody outlook.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Twenty minutes in, Hardy notwithstanding, you might be tempted to bail on Locke. Don't.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    If you want a list of comics-derived spectacles less successful and worthy than this one, "Suicide Squad" heads the list. And that's the only list it'll ever head.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Its dramatic vexations are at war with Denis' prodigious visual skill. And the fight, ultimately, rewards the viewer.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Sicko doesn't formulate a way out of this heartless craps game we're playing. It is, however, a very entertaining position paper, and a reminder that we should do better by more of our citizenry.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The film is Nolan's labyrinth all the way, and it's gratifying to experience a summer movie with large visual ambitions and with nothing more or less on its mind than (as Shakespeare said) a dream that hath no bottom.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Leave it to the first-class actors dining out on those roles to make the cat and the mouse interesting and unpredictable.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    However sterling the craftsmanship, the film adaptation inflates the meaning and buffs the atmospheric surfaces of Yates' story, rather than digging into its guts.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The last 25 minutes of Thor aren't much better than the first. But that hour in between - tasty, funny, robustly acted - more than compensates.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Janssen is an intense screen presence. Too often she's stuck playing humorless towering antagonists. Here, happily, she's allowed to be a real person.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    As close to fraudulent as a documentary can get and still be worth seeing.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    This is a modest but expertly performed piece. And this summer, surrounded by lesser, louder, bigger and dumber diversions, it's especially welcome.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The movie is pretty droll, and it agitates for cross-species friendship; its aggressively packaged heart-tugging elements come with an interplanetary friendly resolution. Followed by a dance party.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    It's very slight, and very short (barely 75 minutes minus the end credits), but the material is just effective and affecting enough to make up for its own schematic quality. It's a matter of watching a series of actors, led by Tomlin, tag off on their respective scenes.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    At its best, though, The Muppets cuts back on the '80s-flashback self-consciousness and believes in the dream.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    If anything, director Cooper is so intent on portraying Bulger as a man, not a monster, the man comes off a little softer than he was, probably.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The drug humor in 21 Jump Street carries its own distinction, in that it's actually humor.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The reason Just Wright works is simple. It finds ways to let familiar characters move around inside a familiar premise like living, breathing, likable human beings.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The movie is held together by the scenes between Thomas and Zylberstein, which are superbly acted.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Abrams knits together the ordinary stories of the mill town's inhabitants in a way that feels dramatic without showing their contrivances too obviously. And his casting of Courtney and Fanning was fortuitous, though Abrams' banter for the supporting kids grows tiresome in that "Goonies" way.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Much of Nebraska is ordinary prose, but the best parts are plain-spoken comic poetry.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Emmerich has no time for poetry or magic, even when the director and his digital wizards (here doing wildly variable work) are trying to dazzle. He’s a taskmaster and a field marshall, not a visionary. But I enjoyed 10,000 B.C. more and more, and more than just about anything Emmerich’s done before.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The film is a success. It works. Greatness eludes it, yes. But greatness eludes almost every film adaptation of a major novel, which we must remember when confronted by a good one.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Wahlberg remains one of our most reliable and least actorly of movie stars, innately macho but vulnerable enough to seem like a human being caught in an inhuman situation.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    It's simply a more focused scenario than usual, full of violence done up with a little more coherence and visceral impact than usual.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    You don't believe a second of it, but it's easy to enjoy, partly because of the casting of all three leads.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    As pure, outlandish outlaw cinema it's undeniable.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Source Code is a contraption, no doubt. But it works.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The film works because the screenwriters, Elizabeth Hunter and Arlene Gibbs, have a knack for juggling a dozen-plus major characters without succumbing to the obvious class-warfare gags every 90 seconds.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    For once, underneath all the motion capture folderol, the key performance really does feel like a full, real, vital performance.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Be sure to hang around for the closing credits, which imagine all sorts of "Jump Street" sequels to come.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The central relationship in Unexpected ebbs and flows, and even when you sense the edges smoothed over to the point of blandness, the actors keep it on track.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Small as it is, the film itself functions as a catchy, bittersweet waltz. You've heard it before, but the dancers are fun to watch.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    It's Williams you never question, who makes every detail and close-up and impulse natural. She's spectacularly good.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    It's nice to see an action movie take more than a passing interest in where our country is at the moment, and then exaggerating that moment into the realm of shrewd exploitation. To wit: Any film combining an indictment of false religiosity with an indictment of violence-solves-violence political pandering in a single line of dialogue — "These weapons have been cleansed with holy water!" — is OK by me.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Nicely acted by all and photographed in creepy, cold, under-lit tones.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Cutler is selling a certain kind of product with If I Stay, but he sells it honestly and well.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Doggedly, or rather wolfishly, the film doesn't go in for camp or mirth, at least until its misjudged and semi-endless wolf-on-wolf climax.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    "Popstar" is most comfortable with material that simply comes out of nowhere.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Sue wins out, and the film is worth seeing, if only for the reminder of how badly justice can miscarry if enough millions are spent by the U.S. government.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Any movie that manages to work in a dig at the National Theatre's heavier pretensions — in a subway sequence, Paddington trots by a National poster for a (fake) play with the amusingly dour title "Damned by Despair" — is OK with me.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The visual style is typical, ultra crisp computer animation, bright, sharp, somewhat clinical.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The movie's fun. And now, thanks to our annual Neeson thriller, spring can come soon.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    This is a film for actual moviegoing grown-ups who don't mind a little quality now and then.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The attitudes evinced by most of the characters, and the movie itself, are those of the admiring tourist, and as two-hour tours go, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel goes smoothly.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The film may be depressing. But even with a terrible, watery musical score, it's also good.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    With his thin-lipped grimace and big, soulful eyes, Lindon's an ideal actor for this sort of puzzle.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The sexual component to Splice pushes the story in provocatively eerie directions.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Whatever audiences think of it, I'd say the latest "Apes" picture is just that: a solid success, sharing many of its predecessor's swift, exciting storytelling and motion-capture technology virtues.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The component genre parts coexist, excitingly, without veering into camp or facetious desperation. Alien-invasion aficionados should be pleased. Western nostalgists may be pleasantly surprised. Fans of cowboys-versus-aliens movies, well, it's been a long wait and here's your movie.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The most coldly compelling version yet of the tale dreamed up by the late Stieg Larsson.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Occasionally very funny, and moderately funny the rest of the time. In mathematical terms that adds up to pretty funny or "funny enough."
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    There's something very right with Off the Black in terms of pure emotion and performance craft.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Without making a big deal out of it, Big Hero 6 features a shrewdly balanced and engaging group of male and female characters of various ethnic backgrounds. It'd be nice to live in a world where this wasn't worth a mention, but it is. And yet the movie belongs to the big guy.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    In terms of its title, Haywire doesn't quite go there; it's more "Haywire-ish." But it's eccentric, and the on-screen violence is sharp and exciting - brutal without being either subhumanly sadistic or superhumanly ridiculous.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The chief limitation of Me and Earl and the Dying Girl is an old story: However touching, Cooke's Rachel is there mainly to prop up the sweetly messed-up young male lead, and then to quietly guide him toward adulthood.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Starts out wobbly but ends up quite nicely, primarily because Carrey has a wonderful acting partner in Zooey Deschanel.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    This is straight-up commercial comedy, low-keyed diversion, and while it can't hold a candle to recent, dark-comic Israeli achievements such as Joseph Cedar's "Footnote," the actors more than save it.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    A preposterous but beautifully polished Danish thriller.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Some of the action (and violence) in A Cat in Paris borders on the jarring, and the slam-bang finale - set atop Notre Dame Cathedral - favors bombast over wit. But getting there is a lot of fun, in part because the animators take time to make Dino a truly charismatic animal.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Danny Trejo plays Sherry's sometime lover and friend, and he's a big asset to a small, sharp film that won't be for everyone. That's a compliment.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Rich and stimulating even when it wanders.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Jones is first-rate (and her fellow writer McCormack is fun as the wild-eyed pot dealer, Skillz). The film has a conventional fake-documentary look, but underneath it is an honest concern about how to learn to treat people well and kindly after the end. Or to get to an ending, or a new beginning, in the first place.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Hardy is remarkable, however. This is an actor with a memorably expressive rasp of a voice, both blunt and musical.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The movie does its duty. It's a reliable commodity, delivered efficiently and well, like pizza.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The film offers plenty of good screen company along the way.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Samsara is gorgeous. And sometimes, depending on expectations, looks are enough.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The movie's fun, a lot of it having nothing to do with its specific subject.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Almost all of it works as wish-fulfillment fantasy.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    It's fun! Extremely violent, cleverly managed fun, full of eviscerating aliens.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    A tender and upbeat spirit informs the writing and the execution.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Like the Danny Boyle film version of "127 Hours," Wild is extremely nervous about boring its audience with its protagonist's aloneness. Still, Witherspoon and Dern are reason enough to see it.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    As Cornelia's revered documentary filmmaker father, a crusty truth-teller in the Frederick Wiseman mold, Charles Grodin provides a master class in minimalism.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Is what we see grief porn or an epic, careerlong study in the best and worst we can find on Earth? See the film and decide for yourself.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    I couldn't help but feel this adaptation needed more of the thing for which Jane herself yearns: a sense of freedom. At their best, though, Wasikowska and Fassbender hint at their well-worn characters' inner lives, which are complex, unruly and impervious to time.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Extremely raunchy, Get Him to the Greek is also very funny
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Grant and Barrymore are very enjoyable together onscreen. Who would've guessed that Barrymore would turn into such a deft comedian?
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    With most stories, even most documentaries, survival is the happy ending — the reward for one's luck, or skill, or exceptional circumstances. Sole Survivor, Ky Dickens' nonfiction account of four sole survivors of commercial plane crashes, turns that notion on its head, exploring the depths of survivor guilt and the post-accident lives of these living exceptions to a terrible, fatal rule.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Spy
    The fun of Spy comes in watching the right actors mess with their own images, blithely.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The result is a clever, violent daydream. But McDonagh's skill behind the camera has grown considerably since "In Bruges." And the way he writes, he's able to attract the ideal actors into his garden of psychopathology.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Swift, sharp adaptation of Stephen King's short story (from the "Everything's Eventual" collection).
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The look and sound of Duplicity is half the payoff.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Barrymore’s direction is generous to a fault, and there are times when you wish Whip It simply moved faster, on and off the track. It succeeds because of the emotional rather than comic payoffs.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    "Relief" is the word for it. It's a relief to see Robert De Niro giving an honest, effective starring performance in a project that does not stink and that, in fact, rises to a respectable level of filmmaking proficiency. How long has it been?
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Keeps you interested in its characters and isn’t afraid of complicating your sympathies a little. In these dog-day months for romantic comedy, that means a lot.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    He's the anti-Michael Bay, the un-Roland Emmerich. No fake-documentary "realism" here; Soderbergh values the silence before the storm, or a hushed two-person encounter in which one or both parties are concealing something.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    As interesting, certainly, as “American Gangster,” and operating with a truer street sense of the characters involved.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    I found most of what's actually put forth in the film interpretively ridiculous. But I'm just one theorist among millions, and the film worked for me anyway.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The events are complicated, though not complicated by cheap thrills or easy politics. It's a film of interest rather than throttling suspense. By the end, however, when Bachmann's future depends on a very simple nonviolent series of events, Corbijn's methodical approach pays off. And we care. We care about the protagonist's outcome.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Guaranteed to make you think twice about what you're paying for what you're drinking.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    He could dance brilliantly right up to the end, it’s clear.This Is It may be a court documentary, but as a heavily lawyered portrait of an artist, it’s still pretty compelling.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    It is good. Not great. But far better than "not bad." Solidly, confidently good.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    While I wish van Heijningen's Thing weren't quite so in lust with the '82 model, it works because it respects that basic premise. And it exhibits a little patience, doling out its ickiest, nastiest moments in ways that make them stick.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    There is a good deal of honest charm in this story, and in the three principal performances.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    A satisfying and movingly acted story.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The result is both a success and a disappointment. It's Kind of a Funny Story, divided into neat little daylong chapters in Craig's stay, lacks the staying power and bittersweet layering of "Half Nelson" and "Sugar."
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Slick, ice-cold and enjoyable, The Bank Job is a bit of all right.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Enough talk; enough flashbacks. Sometimes the best thing a mystery can do is give its protagonist a reason to run like hell.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Scott Thomas can play these sorts of ice queens in her sleep, but I've long thought she's a more effective and nuanced performer in French-language projects than in English-language ones. The performance is laced with just enough wit to make it sting.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    It's an odd film in some ways. The porn milieu is detailed in ways at once sparing, in terms of actual screen time, and bluntly explicit. The odd-couple relationship guiding the story has its familiarities. But where it counts, 'Starlet' ... allows its characters room to maneuver within the potential cliches.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Genuinely odd in its mixture of bluntness and indirection, screenwriter Angus MacLachlan's study in biblical temptation is saved from its own heavy-handedness by a fine quartet of actors.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    One can’t help but wonder if Ephron would’ve been better off focusing exclusively on Child: She’s simply more interesting screen company.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    I enjoyed it as much as any Allen film of the last 20 years.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The way Diary of the Dead chooses to deliver its gore, you know you’re in the hands of a grown-up uninterested in the excesses of the “Saw” or “Hostel” pictures. I mean, there’s gore, sure, and flesh gets eaten. But the way Romero shoots and cuts the shot of a girl’s reunion with her parents, one dead, one undead, it’s played for keeps--the right kind of gross, with a touch of mournful gravity.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    This movie comes at you with an idea or two, as well as every available gun blazing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    I do wish Felicity Jones’ character popped the way Daisy Ridley’s did in last year’s franchise offering. “The Force Awakens,” directed by J.J. Abrams, was smooth, consistent, even-toned, nostalgic. Rogue One zigzags, and it’s more willfully jarring. Yet it takes time for callbacks and shout-outs to characters we’ve seen before, and we’ll see again. And again. And again.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Here’s the surprise: Bandslam may come from synthetic materials, but the characters are a little more complicated than usual.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The visual personality of the movie is fantastically vivid and bright, the story itself, less so.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    At its best Jason Bourne crackles with professionalism; at its worst, it's rehashing greatest hits (as in, "assassinations") from earlier films, with a lavish budget.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    As Kay and Arnold struggle to reconnect, Hope Springs stays close to the task at hand. The characters aren't fabulously dimensional, but the actors are.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Most of the stuff that's new in the new Sparkle, written by Mara Brock Akil (who is married to the director), is shrewd and cleverly considered. The stuff that's old is what people responded to back in '76.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Director Jon Favreau's voice cast for the animals is tiptop.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    What works about ParaNorman is its subtle interweave of the stoical and the heroic. The voice work is inspired, without a lot of theatrical flourish. The low-key musical score by Jon Brion, one of the year's best, teases out the macabre humor in each new challenge faced by Norman.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    XXY
    The acting is uniformly strong, the visual approach self-effacingly honest.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The runaway train thriller Unstoppable is one of Tony Scott's better films.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    If a Warner Bros. social-protest film from the early 1930s somehow got into bed with an American indie from the 1970s, how would the love-child turn out? Like this.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The Dawn Treader doesn't so much reinvent the "Narnia" franchise as do what's needed, and expected, with a little more zip than the previous voyages.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Things We Lost in the Fire finds Bier at an interesting juncture, half-Dogmatic, half traditionalist.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Yet it's worth seeing because the sights are truly something. Claudio Miranda's pearly cinematography, Donald Graham Burt's luscious production design, the visual effects supervised by Eric Barba--everything blends, and none of the seams show.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Malick is a true searcher, true to his preoccupations and definitions of soulful rhapsody. To the Wonder repeats its central motifs aplenty, yet you may find yourself thinking about life, and living, and love, while sorting through the movie. Even if it drives you nertz.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    It's an entertaining picture — pulp, coming from a place of righteous indignation.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Uneven but rollicking, The Pirates! has a personality to call its own.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Southside with You is best taken as a reminder of the value of the slow relational build, of taking your time and actually talking, and actually listening, with someone new. Even if there's not a staggering political future in your shared future.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Spiritual journeys, even if they’re comedies, don’t really lend themselves to the extreme, anal-retentive formalism found in every frame of The Darjeeling Limited.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Dreamgirls is performed, shot, edited and packaged like a coming-attractions trailer for itself. Ordinarily that would be enough to sink a film straight off, unless you're a fan of "Moulin Rouge." But this one's a good time.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    At its best, Hobbit 2, which carries the subtitle The Desolation of Smaug, invites comparisons to Jackson's "Lord of the Rings" threesome.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Whatever the film's limitations, it's certainly engaging to watch. As is Mohamed Fellag, as Lazhar.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Despite the familiarity of its themes — the bottom-feeding news media; the pathology born of extreme isolation and a little too much online time; the American can-do spirit, perverted into something poisonous — Gilroy's clever, skeezy little noir is worth a prowl.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    A knockout one minute, a punch-drunk crazy film the next, Interstellar is a highly stimulating mess. Emotionally it's also a mess, and that's what makes it worth its 165 minutes — minutes made possible by co-writer and director Christopher Nolan's prior global success with his brooding, increasingly nasty "Batman" films, and with the commercially viable head-trip that was "Inception."
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    It’s half-crock and half-sublime, which seems about right for its subject.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    XX
    The results offer a collective shiver (not a lot of shrieks here) for those in the mood for sprightly, short-form misfortune.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    At its best, it's buoyant pop entertainment focused on three things: speed, racing and retina-splitting oceans of digitally captured color.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Director Hancock knows a few things about directing crowd-pleasing heartwarmers, having made "The Blind Side." This one wouldn't work without Thompson.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Rock takes his Good Hair job as a documentarian seriously enough to be interesting, but not so seriously that the film groans with earnestness.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The actors, remarkable and seasoned, take care of their end of things, stylishly and (when and where it can be arranged) truthfully.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The film itself, fond and intriguing, is by no means a hard-charging confrontation. Rather, Lewins' film is an affectionate series of memories, as recalled by Ali's family and associates.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Certain things get fudged in The Founder, among them Kroc's middle marriage, and director Hancock can't completely resolve the warring strains in what he sees as Kroc's personality. But that's what gives the movie its tension, and it works.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    At its best, Wright's film is raucous, impudent entertainment.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Big Miracle tells its sort-of-true version of events in a democratic and humane fashion, by way of a rangy, lively group of competing interests who actually do on occasion act like real people.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    It's best to approach this crafty, intriguing offshoot as its own thing. And this time you actually notice the people.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    As composite sketches go, it's a good one.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Parts of Pride are shamelessly escapist, as when party-mad Jonathan (Dominic West) busts loose with a disco routine, surely the most outre thing ever to hit Onllwyn. But nearly all of it's engaging.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The film is a river of pain, weirdly funny in places, as are all of Herzog's filmic essays.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The funky, enjoyable Hamburg-set comedy Soul Kitchen is a celebration of co-writer-director Fatih Akin's home base, a spacious, moody city of apparently limitless industrial warehouse space - like Chicago.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Monsters is a sharp little low-fi monster movie operating from a tantalizing premise.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Wan is a humane sort of sadist. His latest offers little that's new, but the movie's finesse is something even non-horror fans can appreciate.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Some of it's schematic and on the nose. But the grace notes are what make 50/50 better than simply "good enough."
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    This movie's good. It's fast, deftly paced and funny.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The film is worth seeing, if you have any fondness for the writer who co-created "Beyond the Fringe" and who is second only to Stoppard in his sprightly but mellow wit.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The script embraces certain character archetypes wholeheartedly (pig-headed crew mate; ramrod-stiff officer) and not always successfully. Yet the tone, the mood of the picture, with its desaturated color palette, maintains the right atmosphere.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    From director Ken Loach, England's longtime disciple of social realism, comes his most audience-friendly picture yet
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The depiction of Havana neither sugarcoats nor grunges-up the harsh reality. The movement intoxicates, but the situations are tough.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    A surprisingly heartfelt father/son relationship, handled with restraint by director Todd Holland.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    W.
    In the end it depicts its subject as lost, and pitiable--like Richard Nixon, but more a pawn than a dark knight.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Director Morelli and editor Daniel Rezende know how to set up complex lines of action and keep the screws tight.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Some will take it and like it, all the way to the heart of darkness. Others may feel they've been jacked with, manipulated. Villeneuve collaborates with unusual sensitivity with his actors. The script operates on one level; the interpreters on another, higher level.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Uncommonly good ensemble storytelling.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Enjoy the love in your life, and don't squander it: That's all Curtis is selling here, really. With Gleeson and McAdams at the forefront, About Time has a beguiling pair of rom-com miracle workers helping him close the sale.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The movie is small, but the actors make it seem larger, like binoculars turned around the right way.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    In the scenes between mother and daughter in their apartment, the world outside no longer judging every action, new worlds open up. And therein lies the cinema's role in our lives: It reveals what is concealed to others.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Less polished but more fun than "Dreamgirls." Both are drag revues at heart, one funny, the other serious. I prefer the funny one.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Call The Grey "Deliverance" Lite, with snow, and wolves. And call it a solid January surprise.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    At its sharpest Elissa Down's feature directorial debut is guided by intense, rough-edged emotional swings that feel authentically alive, even when the script settles for tidiness.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    If older kids and adults seek out this picture, which 20th Century Fox and Walden Media clearly aren't sure how to sell, they may well find themselves drawn into a subterranean world of considerable imagination.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Sicario doesn't fall apart in its second half, exactly, but it does settle for less than it should.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    It has the air of an officially sanctioned tribute rather than a probing study, but it's stirring all the same.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Some movies pack such a terrific central idea, even their flaws can’t stop the train. District 9 is one of them.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    This is a violent film. It's rougher, in fact, than "The Hunger Games."
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    It never should've been OK'd in the first place and never should've gotten past the first day. This has a mixed effect on the movie itself, which inevitably fights against its own sense of dulled outrage and methodical role-playing. But it's pretty gripping all the same.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    It's a lot of fun. Its spirit is genuine and, even with the odd vomit gag, fundamentally sweet.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    A lot of director George Miller's film is gorgeous and exciting. Its craftsmanship and ambition put it a continent ahead of nearly every other animated feature of the last couple of years.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The games have begun, and so far they're pretty gripping.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    May have a dull title, but it's lively, idiotic fun, at least until it goes too far past "too far" into the realm of "far too far."
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    Meryl Streep excels as Margaret Thatcher. And the movie itself does not work.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    For what it is - recessionary wish-fulfillment escapism, with a lot of highly skilled familiar faces in its amply qualified cast - it's fun.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    The theater building is a four-story monster, and by the end of the picture we know it very well, in all its broken-down glory.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Michael Phillips
    A lot of people have no use for Carnage, especially in its unapologetically hemmed-in film version. And yet there isn't a sloppily or casually considered shot in any of the 80 minutes.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    When the actors are in cars, the movie's fun. When they get out to argue, or seethe, it's uh-oh time. Happily, director Scott Waugh comes out of the stunt world himself, and there's a refreshing emphasis on actual, theoretically dangerous stunt driving over digital absurdities.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    I enjoyed large chunks of San Andreas, largely because the actors give it a full load of sincerity, and there's some bizarrely effective comic relief thanks to Hugo Johnstone-Burt and Art Parkinson as Brits who picked the wrong week to visit the Bay Area.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Affleck, in particular, finds something fierce and noble in uneven material and in his character's rage. He's not like any other actor in American movies.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Despite my McConaughey resistance I got more guilty chuckles from Ghosts of Girlfriends Past than "Failure to Launch" or "Four Christmases."
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    The Eagle becomes more interesting the further north it travels.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Cody would likely acknowledge she's working through her own contradictory feelings toward her protagonist - and that she may have been a draft or two away from shaping those feelings into a terrific black comedy, rather than a pretty interesting one.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    This one may be soft and derivative. But the actors establish a groove and stay on-message.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    50 percent good and 50 percent close.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    This is almost entirely Angelina Jolie's show...this is a performance that goes from point A to point B without seeming rote, or ho-hum.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    It's the knockabout biblical lark Mel Brooks never got around to making.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    If Chi-Raq disarms even a small percentage of those who see it, and provokes any reflection about a gun culture, the uses of satire and the plight of a sadly emblematic city, it was worth the effort. However mixed-up the results.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Neither fish nor fowl, neither foul nor inspiring, director and co-writer Darren Aronofsky's strange and often rich new movie Noah has enough actual filmmaking to its name to deserve better handling than a plainly nervous Paramount Pictures has given it.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Sloppy, grimy but quick on its feet, which puts it ahead of certain other (“The Hangover”) R-rated comedies (“The Hangover”) we’ve seen this summer (“The Hangover”).
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    The script is corny and cliched and goes the way you expect it to go. But those things never stopped any movie from working with an audience.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    RED
    Red starts repeating itself and spinning its wheels and looking for an ending, well before the ending arrives. The actors have considerable fun with it, though.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Betzer's title suggests a hardy spirit and the resilience of childhood; the story, which unfolds in elliptical but often intriguing chapters, indicates the healing might be a little more complicated and difficult.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    It's a procedural, often absorbing, rarely surprising, about a briefcase bomb and a near-miss. Yet there's no question the film feels dodgy and vague when it comes to the personalities and ideology of the men onscreen.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Jackie Chan co-stars in Morita's old role of the humble maintenance man who coaches the Bullied One. The older Chan gets, the simpler and truer he becomes as a performer.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    For the film to be truer to the school’s reputation, it would have had to dig a little deeper.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Arnold's interpretation is taciturn, often entirely without dialogue, though it becomes increasingly conventional in its scene structure as it goes and as the actors hand off the key roles. In reality it's a bit of a slog. ... The movie plays like an idea for a 'Wuthering Heights' adaptation.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    It's well-crafted, but I wish the film showed us an additional dimension or two of the central figure, who once said the great challenge in writing, any kind of writing, is "to write the same way you are."
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Vince Vaughn, plainly enjoying himself, plays his casually astonished sergeant, who encourages hazing and beatings of Doss.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Katyn will not join Wajda's list of masterworks. In its final flashback, however, when we're taken back to the forest and the details of what really happened, we see what we must see, the clear-eyed way we should see it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Many, I suspect, will fall for The Prestige and its blend of one-upsmanship and science fiction. I prefer "The Illusionist," the movie that got here first.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Rightly, Jolie didn't want to tell the man's entire life story. But as is, at too-convenient dramatic junctures, the screenplay darts back into flashbacks of Zamperini's childhood or young adulthood, when we should really be sticking with the crisis at hand.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Stupid, predictable and fairly funny.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    To be clear: The odds are in favor of you hating it. I hated a lot of it when I saw a barely dry work-in-progress print, 163 minutes long, at the Cannes Film Festival. It’s 19 minutes shorter and better now, though “better” is relative when you’re dealing with a whatzahoozy such as this.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    The beauty of the film is undeniable, as is the cruelty of the bull's lives. (This is not a picture for animal-sensitive viewers.)
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Caine and Law may not be playing human beings, but Pinter’s sense of humor is at least more interesting than Shaffer’s. Caine in particular appears to enjoy honing his cold-eyed stare.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    It's easy to watch.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    The cast's newcomers mix and mingle with ease with the hardened alums of Disney and Nickelodeon TV series.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    I found the first 30 minutes of Wreck-It Ralph a lot of fun, the second and third 30 minutes progressively more routine.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    It's less a western than a loping buddy picture.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    This should've been a really good picture, especially with Hillcoat's crack ensemble. Instead it's a stilted battle waged between the material and the interpreters. It's up to you, the thirsty customer, to decide who won.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    For the record: Josh Duhamel brings some welcome exuberance to the role of the goofball suitor, Hobart. Like Oh, he's fun to watch. This is something never to be underestimated
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    A roughly mixed but interestingly plotted offshoot of "Death of a Salesman."
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Directed, frantically, by Jaume Collet-Serra, written by Brad Ingelsby, Run All Night promises a sprint punctuated by a lot of gunfire, and bleeding, and bodies. Mission accomplished.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    The results fall short of the grown-up comedy about seven-year itches it could've been, asking the Hamlet-like question: to scratch or not to scratch?
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    The film's occasional toe-dips into real-world politics, sectarian conflict and the horrors of war are demure and unruffling. What's missing is a point of view beyond Hallstrom's interest in making his actors look as attractive as possible.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    The material settles for amiably familiar observations about the difficulties of growing old and the glories of being surrounded by beautiful music.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    A grim and fairly effective cross between "The Martian" and "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner"?
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Fairly inventive and exceedingly manic.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    If the romantic comedy Morning Glory clicks with audiences, the McAdams factor surely will be the reason why.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    The best thing about the film is Viggo Mortensen’s performance. A stealth talent of many shadings, Mortensen has a way of fitting easily into nearly any period, any milieu.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    As is, it's worth seeing, but you may get frustrated at the way Dellal raises provocative questions about ancestry and prejudice, only to lose them in the shuffle of so many mini-portraits of musicians, getting to know each other and each other's foreign yet familiar musical language, on a long 16-city tour.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    It's fun to see that charming underreactor Neve Campbell, looking about 20 minutes older, back as Sidney Prescott.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Is the movie itself good? Half-good, I'd say - the second, more openly sentimental half.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Feels different from most recovering-train-wreck stories. The movie is a tidy relaying of a messy situation involving two reasonably functional middle-class LA alcoholics, one of whom gets serious about cleaning up a lot sooner than the other.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Frequently maddening in its reiteration and circularity, Song to Song nonetheless offers more of interest (along with the hooey) than I found in "Knight of Cups" or "Voyage of Time," his recent IMAX cosmos travelogue.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    While Lunacy leaves you with the impression that Svankmajer is more expressive with cutlets than he is with his atypically human-dominated dreamscape, some of the images are doozies.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Stupid but fun.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Near the end, we hear Cobain reveal his disdain for adults who “can’t even pretend, or at least have enough courtesy for their children, to talk to one another civilly.” A painful and unexpected moment.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    There's a good movie in this story. The one that got made is roughly half-good.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Hedges is a determined romantic and a bit of a saphead. He's also humane.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    When the secrets of David's circumstances and motives start spilling into the daylight along with more and more blood, The Guest does a strange thing. It becomes flat-footed and a bit dull.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Made with the full cooperation of the Pentagon, Brothers at War makes the war on-screen seem eminently winnable, eminently noble. Rademacher's desire to prove himself to himself, and to his soldier brothers, may stir different reactions among different audience members. And that's as it should be.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    The way director and co-adapter Armfield shoots it, the film's awfully pretty in its grimness, in the way "Leaving Las Vegas" managed to make train-wreck alcoholism more fake-lyrical than grungy.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Thing is, Levy is a hard-sell man. He pushes the material so hard, it's as if he were working on commission.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    By the time Watanabe encounters a holy senile fool in the forest, the film has foregone contemporary urban “King Lear” territory for something a lot closer to the Lifetime Channel.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Around the midpoint, Pineapple Express falls apart and keeps falling, and the comedy, spiced with considerable, unevenly effective violence in that first hour, goes out the window, and in comes all the gore and the bone-crunching.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Has its satisfactions, thanks mainly to a cast skillful enough to finesse what is effectively two films sharing the same screen.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    At its best, this uneven work represents Moore at the peak of his argumentative skills.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    At least there's Cage, who has become an astute voice actor, finding some odd, clever, energetic line readings consistently fresher than The Croods itself.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    It's big, brash and dramatically it goes in circles. The first two may be enough for most people, especially if they're into Formula One racing, to overlook the third.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    This one's a margin Western. Frustratingly uneven, rarely dull.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    The movie is a paradox. It's ostentatiously restrained. You cannot say Corbijn lacks rigor. You can, however, say that when a talented director's approach too precisely mirrors the tightly calibrated performance strategy of his leading player, a movie risks stalling out completely.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    The second film lingers less determinedly on the degradation of Lisbeth and concentrates more on moving the narrative furniture around. The relationship between the main characters is the glue holding the balsa wood together.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    The filmmaker's access was impressive, the results moderately entertaining.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Jim Carrey is good as Scrooge. There’s surprisingly little shtick in his performance.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Bailed out by a few good jolts, Jurassic World gets by, barely, as a marauding-dinosaurs narrative designed for a more jaded audience than the one "Jurassic Park" conquered back in 1993.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Unlike a few other well-drilled young actress-singers we could name, such as the one whose name rhymes with "Riley Myrus," Gomez knows how to relax on camera.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    There's something off in its scenes of Arterton's romantically unlucky loner showing up at Arthur's home, in the rain, distraught. If the movie weren't so determined to placate, you'd think you're in for a daring exploration of an affair between a 30-something emotional cripple and a 70-something sexy beast, unchained at last.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Role Models wouldn't be anything without Mintz-Plasse, whose character occasions what may be the cinema's first really funny Marvin Hamlisch joke, and whose camera presence is at once unfailingly modest and distinctive.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    It's a very small film, undermined by a puttering rhythm and Pinter-worthy pauses in the second half and a resolution neither satisfyingly oblique nor conventionally pleasing.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    The script is half-a-fortune at best, and visually the picture is staid. But you stick with it, because it's Williams and because certainly no one since Williams has written this sort of embroidered dialogue.

Top Trailers