For 2,301 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mick LaSalle's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Django Unchained
Lowest review score: 0 FeardotCom
Score distribution:
2,301 movie reviews
    • 60 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    The main thing that keeps audiences glued throughout its running time is that it's a love story, easily one of the best American love stories of the past year.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    Breaks the formula for teen romances. Martin Short, as the vain and zany drama teacher, does not disappoint.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    An unforgettable examination of a host of dark impulses.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    The language is brilliant, and the laugh lines come so quickly that you'd probably have to watch the movie twice to get them all.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    It's hard not to come away in awe of a director in complete control of every frame.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    This one is dazzling.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    Movie magic.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    First, this movie should be enjoyed. Later, marveled at. And then, once the excitement has faded, 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days really should be studied, because director Cristian Mungiu creates scenes unlike any ever filmed.
    • San Francisco Chronicle
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    What makes The White Ribbon a big movie, an important movie, is that Haneke's point extends beyond pre-Nazi Germany.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    The experience of seeing this film is cumulative, sober and profound.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    A first-rate thriller about arrogance at the top.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    A film of wisdom, emotional subtlety and power.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    Allen's most satisfying film since "Bullets Over Broadway" (1994) and his most compelling since "Crimes and Misdemeanors" (1989).
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    The resulting film is neither better nor worse than the Swedish film, but it's more cinematic.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    An ungainly masterpiece, but Chaplin's ungainliness is something one can grow fond of.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    Funny People is a true brass ring effort, a reach for excellence that takes big risks. It's 146 minutes, with a story that's more European in feeling than American.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    A great movie.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    A masterpiece.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    It's a beautiful machine, thought out and revved up to the last detail, with no other purpose but to delight - and it delights. [24 May 1989, Daily Notebook, p.E1]
    • San Francisco Chronicle
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    The first great Hitler movie.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    The movie is funny, definitely funny. But underlying the humor is a vision so bleak, so despairing and so utterly hopeless as to make "No Country for Old Men" almost look cheerful.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    The picture, written and directed by Francis Veber, the screenwriter of "La Cage Aux Folles,'' is a complete success.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    It's screamingly, hysterically, laugh-through-the-next-joke, laugh-for-the-next-week funny. It's so inventive…This is a film by an original and significant comic intelligence.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    The Devil's Advocate is a sharp, suspenseful and completely satisfying movie.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    The picture gently caricatures the folk music scene with dozens of delicate brush strokes, creating a picture that's increasingly, gloriously funny -- as in entire lines of dialogue are lost because the audience's laughing so hard.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    Toy Story 3 is a better film than "Wall-E" and "Up" in that it succeeds completely in conventional terms. For 103 minutes, it never takes audience interest for granted. It has action, horror and vivid characters, and it always keeps moving forward.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    It is, simply, the alienation-invasion movie to beat all alien-invasion movies: meticulously detailed and expertly paced and photographed, with sights so spectacular and terrible that viewers will have to consciously remind themselves to close their mouths when their jaws drop open.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    It's a complex, satisfying piece of entertainment, a succession of unexpected, outrageous scenes.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    A movie about serendipity and spontaneity.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    A caustic comedy of Hollywood manners.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    As a great New York story, it’s also a great American story about ambition and failure, about the kind of people who make it, the kinds who don’t, and all the things that can go wrong.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    Has its awkward and rough edges, but there's a purity here, a goodness of intention and a commitment to justice.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    If it falls short of greatness, it's not by much - and it could end up growing with the years. At the very least, it is exceptional and one of the best and most original pictures to come along in 2012.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    Seeing it is a time-bending experience, a way of visiting the past and glimpsing the past's idea of the future. A masterpiece of art direction, the movie has influenced our vision of the future ever since, with its imposing white monoliths and starched facades.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    The film is exciting in two big ways: its simplicity of story (Tanovic does not get bogged down trying to give us an epic history) and the breadth of Tanovic's vision.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    Shot for shot, Big Eyes is one of the most beautiful-looking movies of 2014, but to say that isn’t enough, because it’s not just pretty, not just pleasing to the eye. It’s visually astute. It is made by people aware of what these screen images mean, what they refer to, and the psychological effect that they will have on an audience.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    An unflinching and historically rich rendering of an amazing story. He has made what is easily the best American film so far this year.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    Turns out to be the most unnerving film of the year. Easy.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    Perrotta and Field succeed, not by guessing, but by knowing this world. They understand it enough to see it with cold precision -- and to approach it, at times, with disarming warmth. The characters aren't types, but people.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    One of the most powerful romances of recent years, it is as generous as they come.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    To make a movie about that team and those games requires more than an ability to depict personal dramas or re-enact game highlights. It requires the re- creation of a world and a mind-set, and Miracle accomplishes both brilliantly.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    There's something to be said for a formula picture done almost to perfection. In 2012, Emmerich gives you everything you expect, but gives it to you bigger.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    Other films about Marie Antoinette have had their moments, but Benoît Jacquot's Farewell, My Queen is the first to give a real sense of what it must have felt like to live inside that palace as the walls were caving in.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    The movie has the simplicity and confidence of a Johnny Cash song.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    The year's best romantic drama.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    One of the great Holocaust films.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    In addition to being extremely funny, the film has a warm spirit and respect for the characters.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    It's big, perfectly cast and entertaining in every way, but more than that it feels like a generous public event.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    Its virtues are velocity, energy, innovative storytelling - and something that seems even more the province of young directors: a certain heartlessness and ironic distance in the tone.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    The thing most people will take away from Stand Up Guys is that it contains Al Pacino's best performance in years. So if you don't think Al Pacino still has it in him, this is a welcome chance to be proved wrong. But here's something interesting. Stand Up Guys also contains Christopher Walken's best performance in years. In addition, the film is extraordinarily well cast, and the acting, even in the smaller roles, is more than noteworthy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    An exceptional example of Shakespeare on film.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    Extraordinary.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    A fable about women struggling to free themselves from that myth, and even at its most obvious, it's exhilarating.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    It's a love story only in passing. And yet the love story is what lingers in the mind and gives energy and meaning to everything that happens on-screen.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    In this one masterpiece, Federico Fellini achieved the ideal balance -- between social observation and unconscious imagery, between artistic discipline and freedom, and between the neo-realism of 1950s Italian cinema and the orgiastic flights of his later work.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    There's no other film like it. It's embarrassingly frank and self-revealing, sometimes funny, sometimes creepy, sometimes both.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    Blanchett in Blue Jasmine is beyond brilliant, beyond analysis. This is jaw-dropping work, what we go to the movies hoping to see, and we do. Every few years.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    This is a remarkable feat, not only of cinematography, but of choreography. Just to film Michael Keaton and Edward Norton walking down a Manhattan street, everything had to be timed as in a dance — when the camera swirls ahead, when it goes behind, when it swoops back around. It’s all accomplished so smoothly that it would be worth doing merely as a stunt, except this is no stunt. This method carries the mood and soul of one of the best movies of 2014.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    A great film, the best I've seen since Terrence Malick's "The New World," and far and away the richest and most brilliantly acted picture to be released this Oscar season.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    Bug
    A triumph for Judd and the director.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    One of the best war movies of the past 20 years.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    Though Mom is ditzy and, at times, irritating, we come to recognize her as the family's most original creative spirit.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    Coming now, today, In Time is not just satisfying. I wouldn't go so far as to say it's important, because that would overstate it, but it certainly feels like part of the national conversation. It arrives in theaters at a time when people are camped out in New York saying the same things as the people in the movie. It's weird the way films often anticipate the near future.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    American Hustle is David O. Russell's best film, one that finds him in that ideal zone of spontaneity and complete control.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    A grounded and unusually matter-of-fact adaptation.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    This lushly photographed, brilliantly acted and wonderfully entertaining movie has its own claims to uniqueness. It's the most thoughtful of the three films, and its climax brings the entire series into sharper focus. [25 Dec 1990, Daily Datebook, p.E1]
    • San Francisco Chronicle
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    Presents us with characters of such humanity and dignity that it begins to seem obscene that until now we haven't exactly given all that much thought to the Kurds.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    The word "delightful" is thrown around so much that it often means nothing. Movies that truly have the capacity to delight - that amuse and lift the spirits and create a warm feeling - are rare. Romantics Anonymous is one of those rare delights.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    Gets it right. It's a wonderful movie. Watching it, one can't help but get the impression that everyone involved was steeped in Tolkien's work, loved the book, treasured it and took care not to break a cherished thing in it.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    If In the Cut falls short of the masterpiece Campion intended, it's unquestionably the most ambitious and important film to come along in months.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    The pacing is superb, quick and agile without being frenzied, and the special effects are jaw-dropping.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    In Darkness is an extraordinary movie, and somehow good art creates its own uplift.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    Bride Flight gives a panoramic sweep of lives as they're lived, as there is a lot of beauty in it.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    This is an intense and complicated story, and the film doesn't rush it. It lets it unfold and build, methodically.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    The Details has a light tone, but it's anything but light in purpose. It's committed and passionate, one of the most perceptive and morally persuasive movies of 2012.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    There's a lot to process when watching The War Tapes, and that's probably why the documentary gets even better a few days later.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    A hard, funny and realistic movie about the future.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    The movie rarely, if ever, feels mechanical. Instead, you may find yourself marveling at the fertility of an imagination that could allow itself to toss so many vivid characters and stories—enough to supply four or five movies — into one generous package.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    See Gravity in theaters, because on television something will be lost. Alfonso Cuarón has made a rare film whose mood, soul and profundity is bound up with its images. To see such images diminished would be to see a lesser film, perhaps even a pointless one.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    Magnificent but somewhat frustrating movie.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    It's hard to dislike a picture with flying cows and oil trucks.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    One of the rare films that directly responds to and expresses modern anxieties, this debut feature from director Henry Alex Rubin interweaves the stories of three sets of people, whose lives are upended through various bad things that happen over the Internet -- including bullying and identity theft. A fascinating and riveting thriller.
    • San Francisco Chronicle
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    It's the picture that proves action films don't have to be silly, that a few thrill sequences don't mean every other value has to be shot to pieces.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    [Soderbergh] plays with time and narrative to reveal character, mood and longing in ways you just don't find in a mainstream crime picture.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    So it's two guys traveling, eating and talking. Doesn't sound like much. But it's terrific.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    The Maid would have been worthwhile just as a showcase both for good acting and for the director's virtuosity. But the movie's ultimate virtue is its humanity.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    One great monster movie. [11 June 1993, Daily Notebook, p.C1]
    • San Francisco Chronicle
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    A complicated family story that takes place in three distinct time periods, and that's handled with astonishing ease and fluidity by director Claude Miller.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    This one enters the pantheon of great American war films.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    Now that she's past 50, can we all stop holding Michelle Pfeiffer's looks against her and just admit that she's a great actress?
    • 62 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    An ambitious and exciting piece of work, a movie about sex and movies made by a filmmaker who understands the power of each to set off fantasy, create addiction, incite danger and transform the spirit.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    Dares to present a flat-out heroic president, without the safety net of irony. It succeeds.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    At its slowest, the film has value as a historical document. At its best, the film gives a human face to stories of unimaginable suffering and unexpected triumph.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    It’s coolheaded and incisive, a thorough and informative study of corporations, their origins and their place in the modern world.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    Philippe Blasband's screenplay is witty and economical, and the film's editing is crisp.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    An extraordinary film, mythic in feeling.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    Ferocious brutality is presented without commentary or judgment, yet with unmistakable moral understanding and vision. [21 September 1990, Daily Notebook p.E-1]
    • San Francisco Chronicle
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    A documentary with the emotional power of the very best in narrative film. It has characters impossible to forget, moments impossible to shake and an ending that leaves the audience both moved and rattled.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    Coraci has given us a film that is not only amusing, but well-acted, and not only well-acted, but gorgeous. Micha Klein's animated transitions alone, which are used to signal each change in location, are wondrous and lovely to behold.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    Michelle Williams doesn't just survive. Called upon to glow, she glows. Her performance doesn't solve all the riddles of that personality; none could, and it's for the best that Williams doesn't try.

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