For 1,068 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Nathan Rabin's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 51
Highest review score: 100 The Lost Boys
Lowest review score: 0 The Darkest Hour
Score distribution:
1,068 movie reviews
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Rabin
    Dull and sappy, though anyone who finds Sandler dreamy should love it.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Rabin
    The film almost redeems itself with what may be the longest, most elaborate post-film/pre-credits sequence in film history, but it will still disappoint anyone expecting more than watchable trash.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Rabin
    Goes to great lengths to show the man-child behind the barfly, but in its rush to deify its subject, it lacks critical voices and context.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Rabin
    An initially engaging but ultimately wearying combination of naturalistic acting, cinéma vérité camerawork, and broadly melodramatic plotting.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Rabin
    A tepid variation on the rash of cartoonishly drawn Indian-Anglo culture-clash comedies afflicting both sides of the Atlantic.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Rabin
    Writer-director Chris Kentis has dreamed up an ingenious premise, but he botches its execution. Every once in a while, the film stumbles upon a twist that ratchets up the tension, but then haphazardly discards it.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Rabin
    Best known for "Notting Hill," Ifans remains a charming actor, but even his fine work can't get this lead zeppelin off the ground.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Rabin
    Takes too long to get going to qualify unequivocally as a good movie, but when Jovovich finally starts kicking zombified ass, it becomes good enough.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Rabin
    Incident is too reverent for its own good. It could use a big blast of Herzog-like madness, but it sticks to the conventional show-business satire's arsenal of clichés.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Rabin
    By giving Taylor the last word, Dig! becomes little more than a self-serving, unconvincing infomercial for a musician who comes across as functional and bearable only when compared to his counterpart.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Rabin
    Ray
    As Ray nears its abrupt ending, it veers into camp silliness, complete with a psychedelic freak-out withdrawal sequence straight out of a Roger Corman LSD epic.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Rabin
    The filmmakers have a keen eye for striking compositions, but unlike most advertising, movies have to amount to more than just a succession of vivid images.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Rabin
    It's a clammy, odd duck of a movie, a black comedy that seems strangely content with merely being morbid.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Rabin
    This indignant attack on the way the Iraqi war was marketed and covered feels about as timely and relevant as yesterday's newspaper.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Rabin
    Only when it wraps up all its loose ends with a feel-good sitcom conclusion does it finally reveal itself: It's an interesting failure rendered all the more disappointing for veering so close to success.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Rabin
    Coach Carter eventually curdles into a grim love letter to discipline and accountability, which makes it the perfect sports film for W.'s second term, but not a whole lot of fun.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Rabin
    The Chorus plucks desperately at the heartstrings, but fails to breathe new life into a tired old tune.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Rabin
    Retains every hooky, marketable, and superficially attractive element from its source material while losing everything that made it special.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Rabin
    Well-intentioned and exceedingly nice, Watermarks aspires to warm the soul, but succeeds only in numbing the mind.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Rabin
    The lucky Mulroney gets to play the kind of sensitive hunk that women want and men want to be, but he's the only one who can be heard over the tired wheezing of the romantic-comedy machinery.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Rabin
    The film begins as a delicate duet between Rush and Davis, but as Rush spirals out of control, his performance becomes a flashy, over-the-top solo akin to his hammy turns in "Shine" and "Quills."
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Rabin
    Not even amusing cameos from Bill Murray as a freeloading producer and Michael McKean as a proctologist can keep With Friends Like These... from being as minor as the film careers of its two-bit protagonists. (Review of Original Release)
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Rabin
    Well-intentioned but muddled, Face groans under the weight of its earnest ambition.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Rabin
    Beauty Shop's shtick gets old and tired pretty quickly, but a breezy tone and air of easygoing likeability carry it a long way.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Rabin
    A pleasant but fairly dull documentary that's long on affability and taste, but short on human drama and compelling conflict.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Rabin
    Dash directs with a certain visual flare and a sense of humor, but as the film lumbers toward its climax, keeping track of the innumerable allegiances and double-crosses becomes an exercise in futility.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Rabin
    In the frustrating, underachieving documentary Raging Dove, the filmmakers seem to get shut down every time the film threatens to become interesting.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Rabin
    Like too many horror movies these days, House of Wax goes for scares, but settles for being gory and deeply unpleasant.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Rabin
    A fine cast and breezy tone elevate it to exactly the type of adequate time-waster made for intercontinental airplane flights.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Rabin
    The 2005 version refashions the material into a dual vehicle for Chris Rock and Adam Sandler, "Saturday Night Live" alums who specialize in lazy, ramshackle comedies that are just okay enough to not completely suck.

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