Neil Genzlinger
Select another critic »
For 351 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 44% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Neil Genzlinger's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 52
Highest review score: 100 It's Such a Beautiful Day
Lowest review score: 0 If One Thing Matters: A Film About Wolfgang Tillmans
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 71 out of 351
351 movie reviews
    • 48 Metascore
    • 100 Neil Genzlinger
    The Oscars are swell, but once in a while a film comes along that is so courageous it deserves consideration for the Nobel Prize. An entire generation has been born and gone to college since the Beastie Boys defined that most basic of civil liberties: You've got to fight for your right to party.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Neil Genzlinger
    Considering that he’s a stick figure, Bill, the main character in It’s Such a Beautiful Day, sure does have a complex internal life. And this animated film by Don Hertzfeldt does an amazing job of making you feel it, in all its sadness, terror and transcendence.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Neil Genzlinger
    Commendably, the film, narrated by John Leguizamo, sugarcoats nothing, and the people involved - the players, their trainers, their parents, the scouts - are remarkably forthright.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 Neil Genzlinger
    Comedy and poignancy weave together in Mr. Virzì's hands, but the maudlin meter only occasionally goes into the red zone. And Ms. Pandolfi gives such an exquisitely understated performance that you don't realize until the very end that the film was as much about her character as it was about Bruno and Anna.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 90 Neil Genzlinger
    Ms. Blecher draws fine performances out of the young actors and, to her credit, sugarcoats nothing.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Neil Genzlinger
    A documentary about the unending mess that is the Atlantic Yards project, is unabashedly slanted and as a result will probably be dismissed by those it portrays unflatteringly. That's unfortunate, because this film should be discouraging and dismaying for people on all sides of the project, for what it says about oversize expectations and missed opportunities.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Neil Genzlinger
    This heartfelt documentary is also, more subtly, a tribute to the squadron of caregivers that has enabled Mr. Becker not only to survive for an extraordinarily long time but also to continue to compose music, using virtually the only part of him that still moves, his eyes.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 90 Neil Genzlinger
    This movie is smarter and better acted and just plain funnier than most of its predecessors in the my-first-time genre, no matter which sex is losing what.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Neil Genzlinger
    Mr. Rotaru paces the film perfectly, mixing performance footage with scenes of the competitors talking about their lives and the role music plays for them.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Neil Genzlinger
    Captivating documentary about the creation of, and reaction to, the breakthrough play "The Boys in the Band."
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Neil Genzlinger
    The film couldn't be more heartening - yes, individual actions do make a difference. But it's bittersweet as well. You can't help wondering about all the children who don't get tapped on the shoulder by the hand of fate.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Neil Genzlinger
    The impalement is a nice touch. The death by wood chipper, pretty sweet. But the best bit of comedy in the ridiculously gory Tucker and Dale vs. Evil eviscerates the field of psychology with no bloodshed at all.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 90 Neil Genzlinger
    The director, Harold Guskin, and writer, Sandra Jennings, show admirable patience in letting the story unspool, and the actors reward them.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Neil Genzlinger
    The filmmaker, Theo Love, presents the people in the story as they are, without passing judgment and without apology, whether they are investigators or pastors or just ordinary folks caught up in the inexplicable. It’s Americana unvarnished and, because of that, as absorbing as it is respectful.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 90 Neil Genzlinger
    The script, by Sally Phillips and Neil Jaworski, mocks celebrity culture but never turns too caustic. The movie, like an island vacation, passes pleasantly and all too quickly.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 90 Neil Genzlinger
    N.P.H, as he's often called in these films, does indeed return, singing and dancing. And talking dirty. He, that stoned baby and a stunning riff on the tongue-stuck-to-a-pole scene in "A Christmas Story" will, for fans of this franchise, make this a blissful holiday season indeed.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Neil Genzlinger
    Maybe that's romanticizing things, but baseball wouldn't be half as beautiful without its mythology.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Neil Genzlinger
    The film doesn't just serve up Mr. Balog's amazing and undeniably convincing imagery. It also records his personal struggles as knee problems threaten his ability to hike the difficult terrain to get the shots he wants.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 90 Neil Genzlinger
    Mr. Fisher-Cohen captures Mr. McMillan's transformation from a guy with a funny look and line into someone who believes his own hype and misconstrues his Warholian 15 minutes for widespread popularity and influence. It's a dismaying portrait and, here in the YouTube age, a direct hit.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Neil Genzlinger
    An engrossing, unsettling documentary.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    Ms. Riggs gives each actor a story arc of sorts, and all three are personable guides to this backstage world, explaining the process and terminology and talking openly about their lives and jobs.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    Leaves a lot of questions unanswered, which is frustrating, but it gets high marks for honesty.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    The film genre that might be called Old People Behaving Hilariously gets an appealing new entry with The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared, a sometimes daffy, often droll Swedish movie.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    A riveting piece of work full of unpleasant characters whom you're glad you've met but never want to see again.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    The filmmakers found an appealing collection of relatives and others who knew these artists and Savitsky to tell the story, but they also let the art do the talking, with loving, lingering shots of the brightly colored works.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    The beauty of the movie, in fact, is that Mr. Estevez does not make explicit what any of them find, beyond friendship. He lets these four fine actors convey that true personal transformations are not announced with fanfare, but happen internally.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    Judy Irving injects just enough of herself into her Pelican Dreams to distinguish this sweet film from an episode of the PBS series “Nature.”
    • 41 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    If you can stand to watch this movie — a big if — there is food for thought here about the subjugation and exploitation of women, the limits of psychological and physical endurance, and more.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    Mr. Walker is convincing as a man battling grief, exhaustion and, occasionally, an intruding outside world where lawlessness has taken hold.

Top Trailers