For 2,337 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 67% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Owen Gleiberman's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 The Sweet Hereafter
Lowest review score: 0 What the #$*! Do We (K)now!?
Score distribution:
2,337 movie reviews
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Lee, as he did in ''Malcolm X'' and ''Clockers,'' makes his hero's dread palpable, and though 25th Hour lacks the glittering brilliance of those films, I was held by the toughness and pity of Lee's gaze.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    A swankily austere piece of jeepers-creepers sci-fi.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Cameron wants to take the audience ''back to 'Titanic,''' but the journey's magic is hemmed in, paradoxically, by the transcendence of his previous effort; surely he must know that a lot of us never left.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    At 73, Chomsky seems to understand everything about power and aggression -- except, that is, its centrality to human nature.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Ice Age never matches the brilliance of ''Toy Story'' or the heartfelt heft of ''Shrek,'' but it's an antic and sweet-spirited pleasure.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Entertainingly deft sleight-of-hand thriller.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Like its two predecessors, Scary Movie 3 is a hit-or-miss affair, but the gags that connect really connect.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Paradoxically, a movie that loses power the more you perceive what's actually going on in it. Laid end to end, the story is, to put it mildly, overwrought, fusing several cataclysms too many.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    It's no insult to Tupac to say that he was gangsta rap's greatest matinee idol, or that he lived the part only too well.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The actress (Scarlett Johansson) gives a nearly silent performance, yet the interplay on her face of fear, ignorance, curiosity, and sex is intensely dramatic.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Just because a scenario turns dark doesn't mean that it's convincing. House of Sand and Fog is artful until it lunges for Art.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The key to The Company is the quiet, focused rapture of Neve Campbell, who formally trained in ballet and performed all of her on-screen dances. The tranquil delight she takes in her body becomes its own eloquent form of acting.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Smart enough to hook us with the best thing it has going: Cedric the Entertainer's gruffly uproarious and lived-in performance as Eddie.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Yearns to be optimistic (juxtaposed with the disaster of Sudan, it certainly has the right to be), yet that only ends up underscoring its ache of sadness.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    As the jabbering psychotic Jeffrey Goines, Brad Pitt has a rabid, get-a-load-of-me deviousness that works for the film's central mystery: We can't tell where the fanatic leaves off and the put-on artist begins.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Sweaty and claustrophobic, exciting and horrifying at the same time, it never lets us forget we're riding aboard a giant, primitive tin can, a hunk of industrial machinery that mingles the illusion of omnipotence with the reality of a floating prison cell. [Director's Cut]
    • 63 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    As is often the case with Lee, though, the film left me wishing for even more scenes of casual intimacy, still the most powerful way to carry any message.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Velvet Goldmine is no masterpiece, but, at its best, it's a ravishing rock dream.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    A lot of good actors have gone to work for the Coens and ended up looking like puppets, but Hanks is too clever for that. He knows that he's playing a concoction rather than a human being.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    It took long enough, but Disney has finally come up with an animated heroine who's a good role model and a funky, arresting personality at the same time.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Wide-ranging and beautifully edited -- it's a vivid evocation of a moment when even the ugliest guitar feedback could be taken as a serious political statement.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    People Say I'm Crazy doesn't defuse, or romanticize, the trauma of mental illness. It just humanizes it.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The Negotiator, once it gets going (there's a rather lengthy prosaic setup), is a satisfyingly tense and booby-trapped thriller about the meeting of two relentless minds.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Yet S21, unlike many documentaries about the Nazi era, isn't a sickening panorama of brutality. Shot on video, it's quiet and intimate.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie is sensationally exciting, but its hey-kids-let s-put-on-a-war! story line plays like Beverly Hills, 90210 recast as a military-recruitment film for the Third Reich.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Shot in spooky gradations of silver and shadow, The Prisoner of Azkaban is the first movie in the series with fear and wonder in its bones, and genuine fun, too.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The film is held together by Clive Owen, who spends most of his time on screen hidden beneath matted hair and a scruffy beard but still has more aura than any actor around.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Scalding and glib, derisive yet impassioned, Fahrenheit 9/11 is an intensely resonant piece of Bush-bashing, because it lets the president do most of the work.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    De-Lovely is something dishy and rare: a biopic about a happy, and even enchanted, man.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Everything in the movie -- family demons, May-December sex, the lessons of writing -- ties together with pinpoint precision. That's a pleasure, to be sure, and a limitation, too.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Dark, funny, paranoid, arbitrary, humming with tamped-down eroticism and in love with all things weird: That's the good news.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Palmetto has a satisfyingly deceptive plot that ultimately takes one too many turns.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Harold and Kumar share a quality the overgrown adolescents in films like this are never allowed to possess: They're witty, focused, and highly aware. They make having a brain look hip.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    An intensely exciting puzzle-gimmick thriller, the kind of movie that lets you know from the start that it's slyly aware of its own absurdity.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Michael Mann's tensely funny and alive Los Angeles night-world thriller, is, in its own twisty way, a very high-stakes buddy movie, yet it doesn't look like one, because it leaps off from a situation more jangled and threatening than we're used to.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Code 46 has a noirish fatalism that renders it a close cousin to ''Blade Runner,'' but Winterbottom's film, shot mostly in the light, uses the theme of memory erasure to peer into the eternal sunshine of tragically altered minds.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    A documentary that digs deep inside this most revolutionary and tortured of punk quartets, it's hard not to feel that the Ramones, who never had a hit record, were the greatest band in 50 years to be stonewalled out of success.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    It evokes the spirit of Hitchcock and Highsmith.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    It would be tempting to say that fractured time sequences in movies have become a cliché, except that Wicker Park makes your brain spin in surprising and pleasurable ways.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Even when the catharsis we yearn for arrives, it's tinged with restraint. But then, the true romance in Shall We Dance? is more than personal. It's the spectacle of a nation learning to dance with itself.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Kevin Kline is sweetly befuddled as a good man caught between worlds, and Sigourney Weaver, as a hard, sexy adulteress, makes her wit sting.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The man has the right to retire, but what will he do with all the words in his head?
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Notre Musique is Godard's post-9/11 statement, a meditation on how war emerges from the eternal, and hypocritical, duality of human perception -- the sense that it's always ''the other'' who dies.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Pacino shows you what is only subliminally in the text: that Shylock's heart of stone is really a wall of wounded pride.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Director Niels Mueller's attempt to create a middle-class "Taxi Driver" (he tips his hand a bit smugly by respelling Byck's name to evoke Travis Bickle) has a creepy, meticulous exactitude.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    It says a lot for Joel Schumacher's Flawless that you can see the picture's high-concept heart a mile away and still be won over by it.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Will take you places you haven't been, and also places you have.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Lopez, for all her Latina-siren voluptuousness, has always projected a contained coolness, and this is the first movie in which it fully works for her.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Is it really possible to make a comedy about abortion? Alexander Payne, who cowrote and directed this mischievous bit of sociological screwball, has brought it off.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    A large-scale military drama with a quiet, almost mournful center.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    U-Turn is an overdue event, a chance for Stone to apply his hypnotic acid-trip-of-the-soul wizardry to something sexy and lowdown.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    A stylish B horror movie about giant insects in the catacombs of Manhattan, it's by turns queasy, gross, terrifying, and -- never underestimate this one -- enthusiastically dumb. It's everything you want in a big-bug thriller.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    At times too movieish, yet Ashkenazi creates a memorable figure: a spy who operates - admirably - out of the most unyielding nationalist conviction, only to learn that he needs to let some of that conviction go.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Zippy, enjoyable sci-fi slapstick jamboree.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The highest praise I can give to Mondovino is that it makes you want to sample every vintage it shows you.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    A skillful and winning piece of honest booster portraiture.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Andrew Bujalski's Funny Ha Ha, an ebullient sliver of a movie, follows a group of men and women in their early 20s, and for once the un-dialogue dialogue doesn't come off as an affectation.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Mysterious Skin dawdles more than it flows, but it comes alive whenever Araki, hovering between tragedy and voyeurism, reveals how sex can tear lives to pieces.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Full of splendidly shot wonders.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    As long as it showcases the art of krump, underscoring the dancers with ominous hip-hop beats, Rize is such a vibrant eruption of motion and attitude that you can forgive the film for being disorganized and too skimpy on street-dance history.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Lila, played by Vahina Giocante, who resembles a sexed-up young Emma Thompson, is a teasing, 16-year-old blond baby doll with a gleam of perception beyond her years.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The Beat That My Heart Skipped lacks the screw-loose existential vibrance of "Fingers," yet it teases out a romantic underside to the original I never quite knew was there.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    A fluid and gripping drama from Germany (it has the design of a thriller and the mood of a spontaneous, whirling-camera character study).
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The Aristocrats has a lot of laughs, but as it giggles and blasphemes its way into areas not so far removed from the scandalous landscape of the Marquis de Sade, the movie, funny as it is, becomes exhausting and a bit depressing.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    It's trash, all right, but perfectly skewed trash -- a comedy that knows just how smart to be about just how dumb it is.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    In this quiet, absorbing, shades-of-gray drama, a kind of thriller meditation on the schism in Northern Ireland, we get the story of not one but two powerfully opposing heroes.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie draws us into complicity with someone who may be on the verge of insanity, but only because he's living with the unbearable.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Bow Wow plays the skate-dance hero in a way that's never too cool to hide what an avid achiever the kid is, and he and his buddies converse in a fiendishly alert middle-class trash talk that keeps Roll Bounce jumping.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    As the village is destroyed, its people humiliated, hunted down, and murdered, Singleton brings the images and underlying psychological truths of American racial violence to the screen with a brute dramatic force that few directors have matched.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    More than just a walking fat joke, Sherman Klump is Eddie Murphy's winking rebuke of his own arrogance.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Good Night, and Good Luck has a small-scale time-capsule fascination, yet its hermeticism is really a form of moral caution -- a way of keeping the issues neat, the liberal idealism untainted.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    A mood of lush romantic decadence -- sleaze made enigmatic -- hovers over Where the Truth Lies, which has a score that works so hard to evoke "Vertigo" that it may leave you dizzy.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Kirkman is shrewd enough to coax a wistful performance out of pretty boy Kip Pardue.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Basquiat is an engrossing spectacle, but by the end, as a zoned-out Basquiat stands regally in a cruising Jeep, we realize that Schnabel has reconfigured his story as a kind of ghostly myth, and that we've never completely seen the man behind it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The final affirmation of this romance is really an affirmation of Baumbach's talent: that a young filmmaker fixated on the solipsistic rituals of guyhood understands the hearts of women, too.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Jarhead isn't overtly political, yet by evoking the almost surreal futility of men whose lust for victory through action is dashed, at every turn, by the tactics, terrain, and morality of the war they're in, it sets up a powerfully resonant echo of the one we're in today.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Has too many contrivances, but as an act of sinister staging, it proves Lucas, the noted playwright, to be a born filmmaker.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The director, Joseph Lovett, wants us to ask if there's such a thing as too much freedom, and he has the sobriety to say yes -- and no.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    A big, juicy, enjoyable wide-canvas biography with a handful of indelible moments.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    True Lies is so eager to give you a giddy good time that you're more than happy to let it work you over. It's a likably disposable pop cocktail.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    I don't think it's too much of a stretch to say that this oasis of romance amid the turmoil of Shanghai represents the way that Merchant and Ivory, for 40 years, saw themselves: as a sanctuary of calming, life-size taste in a movie culture grown coarse. It was often far from perfect, but I'll miss that sanctuary.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    He rarely allowed himself to be interviewed, but Henri Cartier-Bresson, here nearing 100, comes off as a marvelous, spritely, and companionable figure.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Young, wizened yet valiant, his voice still braying at the moon, delivers these songs of aging and loss as if caught in a beautiful dream of what lies waiting for him on the other side.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    A fascinating glimpse at the perils of ''exporting'' democracy.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    This moving film explores the trauma of a Holocaust survivor with rare complexity.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Return to Paradise is "Midnight Express" remade from the outside, as existential quandary. It has the moody, disquieting undertow of a true moral thriller.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    A fascinating and lovingly crafted musical documentary that nevertheless misunderstands its own subject.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    A blithe, funny, and engaging movie.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Hard Candy is extreme - a battle of the sexes that glides from tricky to angry to shockingly ugly.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie, in a sense, is just like Bettie's photos: all glorious surface. The Notorious Bettie Page captures, with seductive finesse, how Bettie Page happened, yet what it leaves us with is the tantalizing enigma of a girl who couldn't truly be ''bad'' because she made sex divinely delicious.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    A gratifyingly clever, booby-trapped thriller that has enough fun and imagination and dash to more than justify its existence.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie, which has the slightly glum perversity of early Chabrol, is a dream of betrayal, with the squirmiest attack-of-nature tableau since Willard.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    What sustains the film is the performers' belief in their shaggy-dog selves, which is more than just talent - it's faith.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    A breakneck inner-city odyssey of jump-cut shaky-cam suspense.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    I'm not generally a big fan of tribute concerts, but this is a glorious exception.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The Hidden Blade is tranquil, touching, and, in its climactic sword fight, excitingly real.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Wahlberg, with shaggy hair and a pumped bod he wears more convincingly than any actor, plays Vince as a guy who truly doesn't expect to win. That makes his rib-bruising triumph all the more believable and touching.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    If this is the sound of a new generation, then it may be the first generation cautious enough to embrace friendship as mightier than love.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Has a bright, dishy spirit.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The Truth About Cats & Dogs is very funny around the edges... but as the characters begin to hang out together, forming a platonic menage a trois, the mistaken-identity ruse never escalates into true screwball lunacy.