Owen Gleiberman
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For 2,346 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 67% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Owen Gleiberman's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Lords of Dogtown
Lowest review score: 0 She Hate Me
Score distribution:
2,346 movie reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    A deeply straightforward yet beautifully crafted documentary.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Fast, convulsive, and densely exciting new British gangster thriller.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Lords of Dogtown is a docudrama, rare in its grit and authenticity, that also strives for the mythical youth-rebel excitement of something like "8 Mile."
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Pawlikowski has made a romance that becomes a horror movie in which love, more than anything around it, is a delusionary fever to fear.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Those Oompa-Loompas are the beat, and soul, of Burton's finest movie since "Ed Wood": a madhouse kiddie musical with a sweet-and-sour heart.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    It's a quiet dream of a movie, a vision of loneliness giving way to love, then to loneliness again; it's like "Vertigo" remade in a sedately haunted style of Japanese lyricism.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Amy Adams in a performance as deep as it is delightful, is the film's heart and also its flaky, wonderstruck soul.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Rapt, heady, and startling: the most profound documentary I've seen this decade.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Keira Knightley, in a witty, vibrant, altogether superb performance, plays Lizzie's sparky, questing nature as a matter of the deepest personal sacrifice.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Down to the Bone achieves what only the best independent films have: making life, at its most unvarnished, a journey.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Brokeback Mountain is that rare thing, a big Hollywood weeper with a beautiful ache at its center. It's a modern-age Western that turns into a quietly revolutionary love story.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    To call Match Point Woody Allen's comeback would be an understatement - it's the most vital return to form for any director since Robert Altman made "The Player."
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    It's a fluid cinematic essay, rooted in painstakingly assembled evidence, that heightens and cleanses your perceptions.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Munich, Steven Spielberg's spectacularly gripping and unsettling new movie, is a grave and haunted film, yet its power lies in its willingness to be a work of brutal excitement.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Of the idiosyncratic ''little'' movies that Soderbergh has made to clear his head (Full Frontal, Schizopolis), this is the first that truly connects.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    The film takes off from formula elements-it's yet another variation on "Die Hard"-but it manipulates those elements so skillfully, with such a canny mixture of delirium and restraint, that I walked out of the picture with the rare sensation that every gaudy thrill had been earned.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    The enthralling spirit of Dave Chappelle's Block Party, its mood of exuberant democracy, extends to every rap and soul performance in the film.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    To say that Eastwood, who directed, has done a first-rate job of adaptation fails to do him justice. What he's brought off is closer to alchemy.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Russian Dolls captures how being a sexual cad has become an essential phase in the life of the modern male.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    "Andy Warhol" makes you see that beneath the gargoyle hipster mask, he filled that emptiness with an art of transcendent sincerity.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Maggie Gyllenhaal is such a miracle of an actress that she makes you respond to the innocence of Sherry's desperate, selfish destruction.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Brilliant and psychologically transfixing documentary.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    A work of staggering intelligence and emotional force -- a mosaic of broken dreams.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Sweet Land is a movie of extraordinary tenderness, in which Reaser and Guinee, using a language of looks, make you happy to think about what love once might have been.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Relaunches the series by doing something I wouldn't have thought possible: It turns Bond into a human being again -- a gruffly charming yet volatile chap who may be the swank king stud of the Western world, but who still has room for rage, fear, vulnerability, love.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    It's a poison bonbon tastier than just about anything else out there.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Nader became famous as a "consumer advocate," but as the thrilling first hour of An Unreasonable Man makes clear, that humdrum bureaucratic term didn't do justice to his courage, his vision.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Zodiac never veers from its stoically gripping, police-blotter tone, yet it begins to take on the quality of a dream.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    It's cleansing to see the facts laid out with intimacy and rigor, and the film earns the comparison it makes to the squelching of due process for some of today's terror suspects.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Grindhouse, like "Ed Wood" and "Boogie Nights," celebrates how certain low-grade entertainment, viewed in hindsight, looks different now than it did then, since we can see the ''innocence'' of its creation -- the handmade quality of it -- in a world not yet ruled by corporate technology.