For 1,302 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1 point higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Rick Groen's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Rob Roy
Lowest review score: 0 The Amityville Horror
Score distribution:
1,302 movie reviews
    • 46 Metascore
    • 75 Rick Groen
    Petersen seems to be holding back, telling us about the liberating power of the imagination but never really showing us. Of course, to show us would be to spoon feed the audience, thereby blunting the message and defeating the point. [20 Jul 1984, p.E9]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Rick Groen
    It's perfectly admirable, absolutely controlled, and fully understandable. [09 Oct 1992]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Rick Groen
    The only country in the Western world without a universal system – is indeed Sicko. But if that social wound is gapingly obvious, so is this documentary.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Rick Groen
    Is there an admired British thespian who hasn't toiled in Potter's field?
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Rick Groen
    What it doesn't have is the resonance of Cronenberg's "A History of Violence," a film that exploited the same genre even while transcending its limitations. Eastern Promises delivers, but not on that scale.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Rick Groen
    As always with Anderson, the comedy is neatly embedded in the jaded banter, where the insecurities and rivalries bubble up -- here, all within the bell jar of that shared sleeping compartment.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Rick Groen
    The result is a good movie that falls short of greatness by aping too well the behaviour of its subject – occasionally brilliant, sometimes mundane.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Rick Groen
    A rarity – a political film that delivers its timely message with a cinematic punch and no undue speechifying.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Rick Groen
    Of course, entire books have been written, and perused by disappointed women, about the male reluctance to put away their fantasized Biancas. In that sense, Lars and the Real Girl is real indeed. In every other, it's a sweet, bordering on saccharine, bagatelle.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Rick Groen
    A tender tale of semi-triumph.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Rick Groen
    Love it, hate it, but be sure to watch it, because this odd and disturbing picture is as different as the war it reflects, and that difference is vast enough to seem profound.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Rick Groen
    The result, Elegy, isn't a great film but it is a good one, and better for Coixet's perspective, her ability to interpret Roth's world from the other side of the gender fence.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Rick Groen
    It's an imperfect movie that serves as a perfect reminder of what the movies do best.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Rick Groen
    The movie doesn't have the heart of the book, but it does have a solid mechanical pump, strong enough at least to keep a robust story on two-hour life support.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Rick Groen
    Takes a kernel of truth and roasts it into a popcorn movie. There's terrific fun to be had, and much wry comedy too. What's missing, surprisingly given the subject matter, is any real sense of gravity.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Rick Groen
    It's adapted with charming dispatch from the Dick King-Smith story, and served up by the same CGI wizards who animated the critters in "The Lord of the Rings" and "The Narnia Chronicles."
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Rick Groen
    Cloverfield is an exercise in realism that lacks reality's broader and richer context. Or, put another way, the experiment is artful, but it ain't art.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Rick Groen
    I meant what I said And I said what I meant A flick pretty faithful 'Bout 80 per cent.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Rick Groen
    Great title, and the whiff of existential loneliness that it conjures up – brothers locked not in solidarity but in solitude – permeates the entire movie.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Rick Groen
    Ultimately, Shine a Light is illuminating indeed, even fascinating, but not in the way Scorsese intended. What he has created, inadvertently, is an invaluable documentation of semi-fossilized Stones – musicologists may like it, sociologists should love it and, some distant day, anthropologists will treasure it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Rick Groen
    Dull moments, so much the rule in most genre comedies, are the exception in Forgetting Sarah Marshall -- it does run long, but it mainly rollicks.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Rick Groen
    The ethical fallout, the lingering fog of the so-called war on terror, is not that people don't know what's wrong or who's guilty - it's precisely that they do, and count it as the cost of doing business.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Rick Groen
    This is a blockbuster busting out of the block; this is a Hollywood staple served up on a European platter; this is summertime fare with a wintry verve.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Rick Groen
    The result is a whodunit so nicely crafted that you're tempted to forgive the Byzantine plot -- hell, you're even tempted to pretend you actually understand its twisting obscurities.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Rick Groen
    Gotham gives way to Gaudi and the Met to Miro, but the sensibility is the same, the city as a precious treasure, and so is the message: Life may be hard and short, love may be flawed or doomed, but, my, aren't we blessed with lovely distractions.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Rick Groen
    Spike Lee's voluminous "When the Levees Broke" proved a thorough indictment, a compilation of tragic and appalling facts encyclopedically catalogued. By contrast, Trouble the Water (on Oscar's short-list in the best doc category) has a more personal focus and, although just as damning, manages to strike a more hopeful chord.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Rick Groen
    Shakespeare would have delighted in the chapter, especially in the antagonist, but not at the expense of the longer and darker and still-unfinished book.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Rick Groen
    Plot isn't what drives the picture; instead, this is a cinematic tone poem, where the dominant mood is a Faulknerian mix of sorrow and endurance.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Rick Groen
    Strange and beautiful and transfixing and confusing, it's quite the sight - martial-arts fans may find themselves disappointed, but Wong Kar-wai addicts will be delighted.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Rick Groen
    Without Kristin Scott Thomas, I've Loved You So Long would be a watchable but hardly a memorable movie. With her, it's both - she so fully inhabits the character that everyone and everything around her are simply enhanced.