For 708 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 58% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Robert Lloyd's Scores

Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Homeland: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 I Wanna Marry Harry: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 30 out of 708
708 tv reviews
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The artfully composed images are both crystal clear and cinematically creamy.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The dialogue is always to the point, yet it gives even the bit players enough room to create something memorable.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    A dark and strangely beautiful new sitcom.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It works because it's less about who we were then--it's a fantasy of who we were then, really--than about who we are now.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Its aspirations and its execution are perfectly in sync; there is no way that Meyers could overact, or, indeed, not act enough, that would not suit the material.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The liveliest of the year's new sitcoms. It is low, broad and abrasive, but it moves fast and has some of the urban funkiness of the old "John Larroquette Show" -- the one set in a bus station -- and was indeed created by a veteran of that series, Will Gluck.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Silicon Valley is a comedy, certainly, and a very funny one, but it doesn't spend all its time reminding you of the fact.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It is all very beautiful.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It is a bit like Martin Scorsese's "After Hours," filtered through the sensibility of a Whit Stillman and sprinkled with "Flight of the Conchords"--and yet it feels new, because it is so completely itself, consistently itself, a mix of romance, adventure and stoner comedy (there is a lot of pot about) that never abandons the world the rest of us can recognize.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The current series has fresh air to breathe and new names to drop--Chin Chin, Caltech, Hillcrest, the Edison--and apparently plans to make a meal out of Hollywood. But it hits the traditional notes square on, moving fast in brief scenes and bursts of exposition, and splitting the difference between melodrama and naturalism.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    A humane, human comedy, fun and funny.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The writing rings true as often as not, and the actors do not wave their arms or raise their voices unduly; they play to the human moments between the rim shots.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    By loading his film with musicians and producers and songwriters who can take a song down to its components--some of whom were behind the scenes, some of whom were then just kids buying the records--Lee keeps his celebration smart and not soppy.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Some will find it offensive, immoral, irresponsible--a highly defensible position. It's also very funny, a thing of twisted genius and, for the next eight weeks possibly the most original comedy on television.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It's very good, although as sad and disturbing as the mustache implies.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Terriers is a wonderfully well-conceived, well-made and well-played series about a pair of soft-boiled downmarket private detectives in over their heads in San Diego.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    For all the switchback plotting, the sudden revelations that bring some earlier plot or plotline to naught, the show never feels too obviously manipulative or out of control. This is in part because of the restrained way it's shot and acted.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It clips along in leaps and bounds, and the speed at which events occur can make them seem dramatically obvious, more declared than developed. Much of the time you don't feel the characters' pain so much as take it as read. But the key moments of spiritual revelation are handled well and the production gains power in the home stretch, just where you want power gained.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Though firmly in the Lucas tradition, this is also a Disney cartoon, for a Disney crowd and a Disney corporation--watching, you can almost feel the plastic and the plush--and whatever the characters are up to, however cute or sentimental the business, it is smartly designed and cinematically staged, and not hard to enjoy.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    [Scott Alexander and Larry Karaszewski] and their fellow writers do a good job getting the information out, (mostly) without making the dialogue too obviously expository; it happens at times, but it almost can't be helped. As producer and sometimes director, Murphy keeps the production pretty level-headed-- not documentary naturalism, exactly, but close enough for respect.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Rick Beyer's fascinating, detailed and oddly delightful account of the World War II military camouflage artists whose job was not to hide men and materiel but to create battalions where none actually existed, drawing German eyes and ears to the wrong place.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It’s a professionalized version of Rae's homely original that maintains her voice while sharpening everything that surrounds and supports it.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It's not the greatest thing since sliced bread but rather a well-made sort of sliced bread, a thing you have had before but prepared with quality ingredients by bakers who know their business.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    Berlin Station is a tense, terse thriller--good-looking but never fussy, balancing character and plot in satisfying proportions, a new suit cut to classic lines.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    That the two men are in their 30s makes their perseverance more poignant--to somewhat overstate the case--and that they have no money places them in a long and honorable line of comedians who cannot put two cents together to buy a glass of seltzer.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It does not go deep. And yet in its moments, Graves can be quite persuasive, even moving. (It can be corny too, but corn can work.) Growling and grumbling like a spokesperson for phlegm as he takes Graves from childishness to youthfulness, Nolte finds everything touching in his character, and makes you feel it too.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The leads are all marvelous, with a complementary elemental division of attitudes: Kemper, air; Burrell, fire; Kane, earth; and Krakowski, water, as I reckon it. They rise to the occasion and make it an event.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    The first episode took a little while to seem real, but, as Holder would say, I was feeling it before long. Like Linden, I was drawn back in.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Robert Lloyd
    It is funny and disturbing in exactly the manner and proportions one would expect from his earlier works.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Robert Lloyd
    McKenzie's best moments are all spent in his [new partner Harvey Bullock's (Donal Logue)] company. Bullock loosens him up even as Bullock puts him off, signaling that their uneasy partnership will become an easier one. He performs a similar service to the whole production, bringing it down to earth, keeping it from becoming too much of a comic-book gizmo with its wash of rain grays and rot rusts and spittoon bronzes and Frank Miller lighting effects.

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