For 4,398 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 74% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 24% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Ebert's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Undertow
Lowest review score: 0 Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo
Score distribution:
4398 movie reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    A key part of AA was anonymity: "Who you see here, what you say here, let it stay here." Bill Wilson himself was not anonymous - that horse was already out of the barn - and his fame was such that Time magazine named him as one of the 100 most influential men of the century. Told he should be on a postage stamp, he said: "They'd have to show the back of my head."
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The film's headlong momentum streamrolls over all our questions, and we're carried along by the expertly choreographed action. Even after everything seems over, it isn't, and the last minutes are particularly satisfying.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    In Sacrifice, about a father who loses his son to the power of the state, it is difficult to miss the parallels with Chen's own life.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Red Lights also shows a director who knows how to construct a story and build interest, but at the end, it flies apart. I wonder if there was an earlier draft. I suspect most audiences would prefer a film with an ending that plays by the same rules as the rest of the story.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The Mexican drug cartels have inspired countless films, but never one as final as Natalia Almada's documentary El Velador.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    OK, OK. They're good dancers, and well-choreographed. You can see the movie for that and be charitable about the moronic plot.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It's so determined to be crude, vulgar and offensive that after a while I grew weary. Abbott and Costello used to knock out funnier movies on this exact intellectual plane without using a single F, S, C, P or A word.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The movie's intriguing in its fanciful way, and there are times when both Calvin and Ruby seem uncannily like they're undergoing revision at the hands of some uber-writer above them both.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Benoit Jacquot's engrossing film tells a story we know well, seen from a point of view we may not have considered.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    As a melodrama, Trishna builds a hypnotic force.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The film begins slowly with a murky plot and too many new characters, but builds to a sensational climax.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    There is a lot of truth in this portrait of a marriage running out of the will to survive.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It's an intimate performance portrait.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Shoot this film in black and white and cast Barbara Stanwyck as Elena, and you'd have a 1940s classic.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A Burning Hot Summer failed to persuade me of any reason for its existence.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Watching this film was a cheerless exercise for me. The characters are manic and idiotic, the dialogue is rat-a-tat chatter, the action is entirely at the service of the 3-D, and the movie depends on bright colors, lots of noise and a few songs in between the whiplash moments.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    It shares one annoying practice with their other early films: They like to use distracting little zooms in and out for no reason at all, except possibly to remind us the film is being shot with a camera.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Sometime miraculous films come into being, made by people you've never heard of, starring unknown faces, blindsiding you with creative genius. Beasts of the Southern Wild is one of the year's best films.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    A return to form for Stone's dark side, Savages generates ruthless energy and some, but not too much, humor.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    The movie finds the right tone to present its bittersweet wisdom. It's relaxed. It's content to observe and listen.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    This is a more thoughtful film, and its action scenes are easier to follow in space and time. If we didn't really need to be told Spidey's origin story again, at least it's done with more detail and provides better reasons for why Peter Parker throws himself into his superhero role.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The film is astonishing in its visual beauty; cinematographer Greig Fraser ("Snow White and the Huntsman") finds nobility in this arduous journey.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    The film's implication, quite starkly, is that a strong military doesn't favor crybabies, that a certain degree of rape is unavoidable - and inevitably, that some women may have been asking for it. One hearing noted that the victim was dressed provocatively. In her official uniform.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    To Rome With Love isn't great Woody Allen. Here is a man who has made a feature every year since 1969, give or take a few, and if they cannot all be great Woody, it's churlish to complain if they're only good Woody.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Ebert
    Sam and Frankie are certainly interesting enough that a film about them coming to grips with this hidden truth would have been justified. It also would probably have been harder to write than this one, so People Like Us marches on with a coy little smile, toying with Frankie and the audience.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    Selling anyone the right to touch your genital area for a couple of bucks is not a good way to build self-esteem. Steven Soderbergh's Magic Mike makes this argument with a crafty mixture of comedy, romance, melodrama and some remarkably well-staged strip routines involving hunky, good-looking guys.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Ted
    The funniest movie character so far this year is a stuffed teddy bear. And the best comedy screenplay so far is Ted, the saga of the bear's friendship with a 35-year-old manchild.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Ebert
    We think of first love as sweet and valuable, a blessed if hazardous condition. This film, deeper than it seems, dares to suggest that beyond a certain point, it can represent a tragedy.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Tom has enlisted our identification and sympathy, but he seems hopelessly isolated within his own bubble of despair. How much that happens is in his mind?
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 Roger Ebert
    Linda is a truly good woman, and Rachael Harris' performance illuminates Natural Selection.

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