For 4,126 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 75% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 23% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Ebert's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Working Girl
Lowest review score: 0 Tomcats
Score distribution:
4126 movie reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This film is such a virtuoso high-wire act, daring so much, achieving it with such grace and skill. Minority Report reminds us why we go to the movies in the first place.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A grand, romantic life story about love, loss, regret and the sadness that can be evoked by a violin - not only through music, but through the instrument itself. It is all melancholy and loss, and delightfully comedic, with enough but not too much magic realism. The story as it stands could be the scenario for an opera.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    King of the Hill could have been a family picture, or a heartwarming TV docudrama, or a comedy. Soderbergh must have seen more deeply into the Hotchner memoir, however, because his movie is not simply about what happens to the kid. It's about how the kid learns and grows through his experiences.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    What a simple and yet profound story this is.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The first shot tells us 45365 is the zip code of the town." In this achingly beautiful film, that zip code belongs to Sidney, Ohio, a handsome town of about 20,000 residents.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Wolfgang Petersen's direction is an exercise in pure craftsmanship. [Director's Cut]
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The kind of movie you can see twice--first for the questions, the second time for the answers.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It is nearly flawless.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is a movie that strains at the leash of the possible, a movie of great visionary wonders.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The movie is well cast from top to bottom; like many British films, it benefits from the genius of its supporting players.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Brimming with invention and new ideas, and its Hogwarts School seems to expand and deepen before our very eyes into a world large enough to conceal unguessable secrets -- What a glorious movie.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This series should be sealed in a time capsule. It is on my list of the 10 greatest films of all time, and is a noble use of the medium.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Frank Langella and Michael Sheen do not attempt to mimic their characters, but to embody them.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Seeps with melancholy, old wounds, repressed anger, lust. That it is also caustically funny and heartwarming is miraculous.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Three varieties of love: unfulfilled, mercenary, meaningless. All photographed with such visual beauty that watching the movie is like holding your breath so the butterfly won’t stir.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The movie is brilliant, really. It is philosophy, illustrated through everyday events. Most movies operate as if their events are necessary--that B must follow A. "13 Conversations" betrays B, A and all the other letters as random possibilities.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    There have been many good movies about gambling, but never one that so single-mindedly shows the gambler at his task.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It is a poem of oddness and beauty.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    An unexpected kind of masterpiece by Haneke, whose films have included the enigmatic "Caché" and the earlier Golden Palm winner "The White Ribbon." We don't expect such unflinching seriousness, such profundity from Haneke.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Drugstore Cowboy is one of the best films in the long tradition of American outlaw road movies - a tradition that includes "Bonnie and Clyde," "Easy Rider," "Midnight Cowboy" and "Badlands."
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is a film that is affirming and inspiring and re-creates the stories of a remarkable team and its coach.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is the Batman movie I've been waiting for; more correctly, this is the movie I did not realize I was waiting for, because I didn't realize that more emphasis on story and character and less emphasis on high-tech action was just what was needed. The movie works dramatically in addition to being an entertainment. There's something to it.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    I don't know what vast significance Michael Clayton has (it involves deadly pollution but isn't a message movie). But I know it is just about perfect as an exercise in the genre.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    At the end we are left with the reflection that human consciousness is the great miracle of evolution, and all the rest (sight, sound, taste, hearing, smell, touch) are simply a toolbox that consciousness has supplied for itself.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    LaBute's "Your Friends and Neighbors'' is to "In the Company of Men'' as Quentin Tarantino's "Pulp Fiction'' was to "Reservoir Dogs.'' In both cases, the second film reveals the full scope of the talent, and the director, given greater resources, paints what he earlier sketched.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    We've seen this done before, but seldom so well, or at such a high pitch of energy.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Unlike "Saving Private Ryan" and other dramatizations based on D-Day, Overlord is an intimate film, one that focuses closely on Tom Beddoes (Brian Stirner), who enters the British army, goes through basic training and is one of the first ashore on D-Day. (Reviewed in 2004)
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Beresford is able to move us, one small step at a time, into the hearts of his characters. He never steps wrong on his way to a luminous final scene in which we are invited to regard one of the most privileged mysteries of life, the moment when two people allow each other to see inside.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Here is a bold, beautiful, visually enchanting musical where we walk INTO the theater humming the songs.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It's one of the best films of the year.

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