For 1,795 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Moore's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Get Low
Lowest review score: 12 Creature
Score distribution:
1795 movie reviews
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    Gemma Bovery manages a few surprises, even if you know the Flaubert novel Simmonds was sending up.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    A warts-and-all documentary about the daredevil-hustler, that for all its inherent evil — and the guy was a real piece of work — is still a joyous, laugh-out-loud celebration of an outlandish, larger-than-life showman.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    It all adds up to a terrific, if biased on the side of the winners (Dre and Cube) history lesson, and a thoroughly compelling, very American and utterly modern musical biography.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    The Hollywood debut of Korean filmmaker Chan-Wook Park (“Oldboy”) is a vivid, short exercise in tone, a movie lacking shocks and huge surprises, but one that makes up for that by creeping us out, from start to finish.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    Funnier than the last Muppets movie, with far better songs (by Bret McKenzie), punnier puns and all manner of geo-political gags, cultural wisecracks and star cameos.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    We get little sense of his interior life, what was going on in his head as school, girlfriends and music were competing for his attention and music was winning out. His drive is suggested, but never really felt in the performance.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    The Kafkaesque nightmare a woman endures trying to get a divorce in a theocracy is played out, in sometimes comical/often excruciating detail in Gett: The Trail of Viviane Amsalem.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    Truman becomes a bittersweet character study in death and friendship, a film that lets the sweet overcome the bitter.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    It’s a beautifully shot and reasonably balanced film, but one that struggles to find a hopeful note to end on.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    The film is more overwhelming than uplifting.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    Caine is magnificent. This is not some laughable Stallone-boxing-at-60 exercise in vanity. He's an old man playing an old man, but one who lived through experiences that both scarred him for life and prepared him for his final test.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    The Liberator may be a Cliff Notes version of South American history, but Ramirez breathes life into it and makes us care.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    As “cute and cuddly” as ever, and often downright hilarious.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    The performances and the ready supply of one-liners make this an amusing look at a new generation getting lost down memory lane.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    It’s good, but we’ve come to expect more from the guy who gave us “Fight Club” and “The Social Network.” This is more on a par with “Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.” The calculated shocks feel like a movie we’ve seen before, though at least in this case, that’s not true.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    It’s a fascinating period in music and an equally fascinating story of promise, talent, expectations and failure. But you can’t help but feel that Big Star: Nothing Can Hurt Me won’t settle the most important argument of all to the unconverted — Were they as good as the hype?
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    An eye-opening period piece that takes us back to the dark days of the Irish Police State.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    Witty, warm, well-cast and often wickedly funny.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    Call Me Lucky is another of those “the funniest comic you never saw” documentaries.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    Here’s an eccentric tragicomedy, with music, built to play like gangbusters at Austin’s South by Southwest music-movie fanboy/fangirl festival.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness is a great name for a documentary about Hayao Miyazaki and his animation house, Japan’s Studio Ghibli.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    Diamond Tongues is a witheringly funny but still sympathetic portrait of a show business “type.”
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    It's a gritty, almost ugly to look at film, and Cianfrance isn't shy about including a random blast of unwarranted shaky footage.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    It’s a darned entertaining way to get a handle on a sport that can seem like a bunch of cars doing circles for a crowd that seems most interested in seeing that next epic wreck.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    Its chilling third act suggests that sooner or later, even these riders on the Islamic short bus are going to get one right. And that won't be funny at all.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    A dark and brawny version of the Robin Hood legend that anchors itself in English history and loses some of the merriment in the process.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    Tanne has crafted a winning film of smart, probing conversation that plays like an affectionate going away gift to the Obamas.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    The legends of America’s great robber barons are equal parts inspiring and appalling. And damned if The Founder doesn’t get that balance just right.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    It’s a smidge too cute and a bit too long, but Huard and Scott make this comical journey (in French and “Franglish” with English subtitles), a trip from indifference to kindness, incompetence to responsibility, a most rewarding reinvention of what “family” can mean.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    But as with every other film in his fast-growing canon, Gibney wields his authoritative research and storytelling skills like a scalpel, getting at a subject we aren’t talking about with blunt facts and informed, cautionary speculation.

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