For 186 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Sara Stewart's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 52
Highest review score: 100 Wetlands
Lowest review score: 0 Would You Rather
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 69 out of 186
  2. Negative: 47 out of 186
186 movie reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Sara Stewart
    This Belgian drama is the real deal, an alternately wrenching and ecstatic viewing experience, adapted from a play by lead actor Johan Heldenbergh.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Sara Stewart
    Take note, Lars von Trier: This is how you do a truly funny, subversive movie about a woman’s obsession with the human body and sex.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Sara Stewart
    How to Survive a Plague, while a shaggier-structured documentary than many, is a heart-wrenching portrait of one of the saddest, most heroic chapters in American history.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Sara Stewart
    This is a compelling and comprehensive guide to one of the most Kafkaesque crime stories in American history.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 88 Sara Stewart
    I’d like to see a sequel about her freshman year at college, please. There were still a few items on that list left unchecked.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Sara Stewart
    Not since “American Movie” has there been such an entertainingly clumsy, warts-and-all documentary about making a movie, this time courtesy of Cincinnati filmmaker Tom Berninger.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Sara Stewart
    The film’s slightly confusing ending doesn’t spell anything out, but that’s all right: We’re left sitting in the dark shivering, reassured there are still some directors who can leave us well and truly creeped out.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Scrappy and unsettling, V/H/S puts the majority of today's mainstream "scary" movies to shame.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Harris, a talented comic actress who looks more like a real person than a Hollywood facsimile of one, makes every scene she's in shine.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Ultimately, Sleep Tight makes a sounder case for nocturnal Webcams than the "Paranormal Activity" franchise ever could.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Sure, it’s got its horror aspects. But for my money, this movie belongs alongside “Secretary,” “Ginger Snaps” and “Thirteen” in the family of deliciously dark female coming-of-age stories.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    There’s not a bad performance in the bunch. Hendricks’ and Fanning’s Brit accents are nicely un-showy.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    The upstart Sapphires are a smash to watch as they cover soul tunes like “I Heard It Through the Grapevine,” “What a Man” and “I Can’t Help Myself.”
    • 46 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    This indie, female-centric riff on “Deliverance” is spare, smartly written and shot through with moments of twig-snapping tension.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Daunting though it may be for the aspiring pick-up entrant, this is a fun and worthwhile ode to one of New York’s greatest summer pastimes.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    In a film that’s often sad but not without its triumphs, director Morgan Neville smartly explores the complex role that ego and self-promotion play in this profession.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    As in the original “Despicable,” masterful physical comedy is what raises this animated pic so far above most of its competitors.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    The real treat here is the science, not the fiction. The film’s sleek aesthetic was developed in consultation with NASA about what such a mission would actually require, and look like as viewed on surveillance cameras.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    My own voice-over would go something like this: “This summer. One woman. Will see this movie. Again.”
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    In some ways, it feels like an indie meditation on the eternal “When Harry Met Sally” question: Can men and women be just friends? Here, though, the focus is on the small, often unsaid moments that define a friendship — and a murky attraction.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    A first-rate example of good storytelling and well-timed — while not excessive — gore. Its disgusting, hilarious conclusion left me eager to see what’ll be next from director Jim Mickle.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    The sweet-faced Kelly is a lovely and humble storyteller, and her enduring affection for John, Paul, George and “Richie” is palpable.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    After Tiller is groundbreaking in giving voice not only to the doctors, but to those who always seem to get overlooked in the high-volume political debate about this topic: the women themselves.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Though it boasts an eye-catching roster of supporting performances — Jennifer Hudson, Jordin Sparks, Jeffrey Wright, Anthony Mackie — most of the running time is spent with Mister (Skylan Brooks) and Pete (Ethan Dizon), and both child actors hold your attention impressively.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    A big, dark film that should satisfy the many fans of the Orson Scott Card novel and engage newcomers, too.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    It’s slightly tough to get onboard with the regal Naomi Watts sporting badly sprayed hair and frosted lipstick; surely there are more flattering shades at the Walgreens?
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Yes, it’s the middle chapter and feels like it, but it’s never dull.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    In one of Hugh Hefner’s least creepy moments ever, he describes how they became friends later in life; with his help, she finally obtained the legal rights to her rampantly used image.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    What the film lacks in plot twists it makes up for in sheer amazement.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Will Forte continues his transition into serious actorhood with this indie.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Maybe my favorite thing about this About Last Night, though, is that it’s proof romantic comedies don’t have to be so predictable.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    The star gives us a generous and hilarious portrait of life as an aging legend.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    A mouse and a bear defy social convention to forge a friendship in this lovely, charming and Oscar-nominated French animated feature (now available dubbed into English with the voices of Forest Whitaker and other notables).
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Sparse of dialogue, terrifically ominous and full of low-key, high-quality performances, Blue Ruin is a vigilante tale even haters like me can get behind.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    The striking Thierry brings her character to nuanced life on screen.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    The result is a thoughtful, dreamlike (at times, nightmarish) tour through the day-to-day lives of several suburban California teens.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    In a move sure to infuriate “nanny state” critics, director Stephanie Soechtig names the US government and food corporations responsible for a campaign to get Americans addicted to junk food — particularly, and most dangerously, sugar — as early as possible.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Writer/director James Ward Byrkit, in his feature debut, achieves effective chills with only eight actors and a living room, intermixing quantum physics (shout-outs range from Schrödinger’s cat to “Sliding Doors”) with the very mundane human tendency toward bad judgment calls in a crisis.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    The film doesn’t wallow in grief; it’s a thoughtful and nuanced portrait of a stage of life we often choose not to see.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    If Michael Fassbender wears a giant papier-mâché head for most of a film, is he still mesmerizing? Happily, yes.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    In Abuse of Weakness, Breillat, notorious for her sexually explicit films, casts the excellent Isabelle Huppert as her avatar, Maud, to tell the tale.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Schechter’s soul-scored film is impeccably styled for the time period, and its easy pacing reminds me of the gold standard for Leonard adaptations, “Out of Sight.” It’s not that good, but it’s within striking distance.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Director Catherine Gund most successfully depicts the visceral impact of Streb’s work with her footage of the 2012 Olympics.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Finally, a post-“Bridesmaids” film that lets Kristen Wiig shine — and brilliantly taps into co-star Bill Hader’s vulnerable side, too.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Curran (“The Painted Veil”) never imposes any additional structure on Davidson’s story, which may test the patience of some viewers. But I found the sprawling, wild visuals in Tracks, and the long silences as the sunburned Robyn traverses some of the world’s least hospitable lands, meditative and moving.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Khaou’s film features masterful performances from Whishaw and Cheng, whose dialogue is somehow intensified, rather than diluted, through the third-party voice of the translator. But some emotions, the film suggests, are impossible to adequately articulate in any language.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Fogel’s focus is female friendship, and the challenges presented by growing older and pairing up. It all makes for a rocky road, regardless of the romantic rival’s gender.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    A serviceable animated movie about a soft-hearted Dracula.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    If you can handle the glacial pacing and lack of dialogue, there is a certain squirmy satisfaction to watching this well-worn story of love, cruelty and madness play out minus the long-winded speeches and romantic catharsis.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    The mellow Laue... makes a likable enough subject, if sometimes low-key to the point of dull. Watching other people watch him play, though, is definitely not.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    Jane's friendship with Sadie is the one thing that cuts through the numbness - though the film's so low-key, even emotional revelations feel pretty muted.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    Finally, someone took the source material at its terribly written word and stopped treating the whole affair so seriously.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    In a movie season - and a month - filled with so much gunfire, bloodshed and human despair, it's refreshing to sit back and bask in the sheer joy with which these brightly costumed, stunningly agile performers navigate fire, water and air.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    Mostly, though, it all ends up feeling like a lost, minor episode of “The X-Files:” A little scary, a little silly and catnip for those who want to believe.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    A trove of home videos, vintage commercial and propaganda footage and black-and-white animation dress up this energetic if somewhat unfocused look at the birth of skateboarding in the German Democratic Republic.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    Director Daniel Algrant chose well with Badgley, who transcends the rather made-for-TV vibe with a decent rendition of Buckley’s haunting falsetto.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    This documentary, a love letter to their sisterly bond, gives a reasonably engaging look behind the scenes.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    Still, the proceedings move so quietly and thoughtfully as to be occasionally somnolent, though they’re punctuated with spasms of the violence that marked the Troubles.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    Leong’s film isn’t particularly stylish, but it makes the most of the climactic Knicks footage, as well as showcasing a sweetly goofy side of the 25-year-old, now playing for the Houston Rockets.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    Overall, Gibney does a fine job documenting the timeless nature of Armstrong’s fall from grace. It’s undeniably satisfying to see the man himself lay it out: “It’s very hard to control the truth forever,” he says, awkwardly. “This has been my downfall.”
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    The element that really makes it work — when it does, which is not always — is Edward James Olmos, playing to perfection a weary retired police detective.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    A refreshingly naturalistic depiction of the dynamic of traveling companionship — at any age.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    As About Alex moves toward its conclusion, it devolves into some plot resolutions that were a lot less predictable back in the ’80s.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    The Giver is at its best when Bridges expounds on civilization’s lost beauty and savagery; at other times, it’s strewn with implausibility: For a totalitarian society in which everyone is monitored constantly, our hero is able to sneak around an awful lot.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    The considerable charms of Miles Teller and Analeigh Tipton elevate this middling rom-com.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    “It’s a little self-congratulatory and light on story,” says one student of another’s film project in Dear White People, which feels like director Justin Simien getting out ahead of inevitable (and accurate) criticism.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    The best thing about the film – which is true of most of his roles – is Rockwell.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    Farrell feels like a weak link here, never quite as masterfully manipulative or brutish as the role calls for.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    There are a lot of parallels with “Breaking Bad” here: the Southwestern setting, the dorky husband turned criminal, the blond wife and the scene in the carwash. But if you can avoid dwelling on its derivative qualities, After the Fall has its own case to make about how far the middle class has fallen — and continues to slide.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    For a movie called Sparkle, the absolutely least interesting or central thing about it is Sparkle (and Sparks), although the "Idol" singer does bust out one impressive performance.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Director Ben Hickernell soft-pedals the material into a blandly feel-good dramedy. As Abigail's spirited young trainees, Alexandra Metz and Meredith Apfelbaum give Backwards their all, but can't row their way clear of its clichés.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Yes, there are the requisite jump-in-your-seat scares, many of them false alarms, and it all plays out basically exactly like any other horror movie, but Lawrence does elevate the proceedings.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Here's the thing: Found footage is scary when - because - it leaves you to fill in a lot of the blanks yourself. But actually watching whole families have terrible things done to them - well, hard-core horror fans may dig it, I guess. I'd call it forced voyeurism of the worst sort.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Watching this yoga documentary mirrored how I feel about taking weekly classes: The ancient Eastern tradition is demonstrably beneficial for both mind and body, but its execution can be so boring and its teachers so painfully earnest.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    An inoffensive but bland ode to the talky high school movies of John Hughes and Cameron Crowe.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    This is hardly reinventing the wheel, but it is serviceable, if you're looking for a few shivery communal scares.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Tonally, the film swings between whispery romance and ominous horror as it explores the dark side of love and lust, including an amusingly gory meditation on the notion that the person you think is your beloved might just rip your heart out.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Too much of the film is taken up by creaky plot devices and one sibling vowing to track down and talk to another one to resolve a problem.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    While Caplan works well in theory as an antiromantic-comedy heroine, director and co-screenwriter Michael Mohan just doesn't give her enough to do.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    There's also a refreshing lack of wrapping everything up in a neat, happy bow at the end.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Sure, violence in movies isn't violence in real life. And when you combine it with intelligent dialogue and pointed social commentary (a la "Django Unchained"), it can be cathartic. But The Last Stand, absent either of these things, just seems to want to gin up a lot of high-fiving for a lot of shooting, and right now is the least palatable time I can think of for that.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Adapting the author’s cornball formula for a second time around is once-ambitious director Lasse Hallström (“Dear John”), who delivers a cinematic valentine you’ll be reasonably content to watch on a flight in a year or so.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Temple and Angarano, entertaining enough, never quite sell the idea that this goodhearted couple would be so easily transformed by greed.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Director Christian Charles gets some comic mileage from the inimitable Walsh and Rae, but it’s ultimately hard to care too much about a caddish protagonist like Norman — or, for that matter, about the clichéd “women are crazy!” sentiment that hums nastily under the antics of Dori’s unorthodox family gathering.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Alas, the film’s relevance — and ultimately sane upshot — is buried beneath a meandering and oftimplausible plot.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Director Mark L. Mann seems to be searching for the meaning in aimlessness, and in lowered expectations. But too often the narrative left me feeling the titular “um.”
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Are Some Girl(s) like this? Yes. But I left this movie with no additional insight on why.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Twi-hards, Beliebers and Whovians have nothing on the cult of Jane Austen, whose beribboned ranks are ripe for satire. Unfortunately, this scattershot comedy only occasionally hits the mark.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    No personal revelations surface in “This Is Us.” Also, no narrative, no conflict — no differentiation between band members, even, besides the designation of dark-eyed Zayn as “the mysterious one” (he likes to paint).
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Director Suri Krishnamma capably depicts the darkness in Jim’s head with his shadowy surroundings, misanthropic inner monologue and increasingly frequent hallucinations, and Griffith’s vulnerable performance is a standout. But the film’s final third seems needlessly graphic.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    The birth of the titular infant — what the whole movie’s leading up to — is just an anticlimactic mess.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    As a distinctly not-insider, though, I would have benefited more from a broader portrait of the woman herself, and how she became such a legend.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    At the risk of sounding 100, I think it’s regrettable this film had to be shot in digital 3-D. Both those formats actually do a frustrating disservice to the depiction of the action, making them look choppier, more flickery and occasionally blurrier than they would otherwise.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Italian director Carlo Carlei has a background in TV movies, and this film, plodding and earnest, seems meant for the small screen, too.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Teen Lisa Johnson (Abigail Breslin) is trapped in a kind of undead, unfunny “Groundhog Day,” living one particular 24 hours with her family over and over.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Not surprisingly in this tale of desperate men, the only women are top-heavy cartoon characters — literally, animated sequences illustrate Frank’s stories — or live-action betrayers, like Dakota Fanning’s Annie, Frank’s ex-girlfriend. I found the cartoons more interesting.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Like the rest of Dear Mr. Watterson, it’s a good-hearted gesture. But unlike Calvin’s alter ego Spaceman Spiff, this film never manages to achieve liftoff.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Despite all its problems, The Last Days on Mars serves up a deliciously shivery hypothetical: Wouldn’t we all secretly love it if the Mars rover sent back footage of a “walker” or two?
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    The film strains credulity as it hurtles toward its conclusion.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    It is admirably unsparing and gloomily atmospheric. And I looked at my watch a bunch of times.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    There’s little sense of urgency, or — oddly, given the film’s title — of scale. You never really think that the 47 are truly outnumbered, and the large action scenes are often just incomprehensible.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    None of this is particularly innovative, although Garcia and the elder Farmiga develop a nice spark and a gentle humor in their characters’ stolen day together.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Love is the weak link in this clumsily titled rom-com, which plays a bit like a hipster infomercial for Austin, Texas.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    The Pretty One does find a handful of genuinely sweet moments in which Basel and Laurel bond on letting their respective freak flags fly. Like the film itself, Kazan is at her best when she’s not trying so hard to be cute.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    While absolutely nothing in Grand Piano makes the least bit of sense, it is admittedly gorgeous to look at and listen to. Give Mira a decent script, and he might be a director to be reckoned with.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    It’s all headed for a showdown, of course, and duly delivers, though Crudup and Taylor are the only ones who really seem to have a handle on the New Yawk accent.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    The many silences in Hide Your Smiling Faces don’t speak quite loudly enough, and the film ultimately gets bogged down by its own ponderousness.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Given the scarcity of movies about lust from the female point of view, this is kind of a bummer.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    A rather unremarkable, if endearing, entry in the quirky rom-com genre.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Small Time has its heart in the right place, but its screenplay’s in serious need of a tuneup.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Well-intentioned, if ultimately underwhelming, ode to the ongoing fight for a cure.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Nobody does the rebellious-elder thing as well as Duvall, and whenever he’s center stage in A Night in Old Mexico, this scrappy film from Spanish director Emilio Aragon is entertaining enough.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Gregg, who previously directed the very dark comedy “Choke,” never quite settles on a tone; from the opening scenes, in which Molly Shannon plays a neurotic stage mom and Allison Janney a chilly casting agent, it seems he’s going that way again, but a dramatic twist sends the film into less plausible territory.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    As much fun as it is, this all-star tribute is awfully one-note, never questioning Gordon’s seemingly casual habit of befriending only the ultra-famous.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Writer/director Andrew Levitas needlessly pads this captivating theme with over-used tropes.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    So why isn’t They Came Together more uniformly hilarious? Perhaps it’s that elusive problem of trying to explain why a thing is funny in the first place: Spelling it out deflates the joke.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Despite the dramatic dystopia, performances here are uniformly low-affect, which isn’t helpful given the exposition-heavy dialogue and unremarkable set (though Nick’s extraterrestrial visions have a pleasantly kitschy look). Also puzzling is the fact that the pivotal song is not actually performed by Morissette.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    This pastiche of sitcomy episodes never gels into a plot.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    “Gatsby” meets “Gossip Girl” in this outsider-among-the-wealthy story set, like Fitzgerald’s novel, on Long Island.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    As apocalypse scenarios go, this one feels both retro and commendably topical: Nuclear bombs, remember those? (Also: Edward Furlong, remember him?)
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    This Disney sequel to 2013’s “Planes” is a lot like flying coach: serviceable, but not trying that hard.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Concert sequences are engaging, though I was disappointed not to see any animated flourishes.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Lee may not want to let anyone in, but it’s hard to engage fully with a film that doesn’t seem to want to, either.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    On the whole, the film would probably be more at home on cable and at a reduced running time. I’d like to see a competition series of the same name, in which rival engineers compete to see who can endure having the hard-driving Cameron for a boss.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Compared to another recent teen weepie, “The Fault in Our Stars,” this one comes up wanting. That film’s strong point was the delight its heroine took in detonating romantic clichés; If I Stay seems determined to keep them on life support.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Kelly & Cal is at its best when focused on Lewis and Weston.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    The Maze Runner isn’t based on a video game, but you could be forgiven for thinking otherwise. In it, our hero must lead his comrades through a dingy gray concrete maze while dodging cyborg monsters, and it all looks like every gaming trailer you’ve ever seen.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Perhaps faithful to the spirit of the man, but frustrating if you’re actually curious about the facts.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    For parents of very young children looking for a weekend distraction, “Color City” is passable fare — and will at least inspire kiddies to finish what they start, coloring-wise.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Sweet and funny — largely thanks to James Corden in the lead role — it’s never particularly surprising.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Just in time for Mexico’s Day of the Dead holiday comes this gloriously colorful animated musical, which almost (but not quite) makes up in visuals what it lacks in snappy dialogue.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Like the artificially sweetened junk food it is, this all goes down pretty easily.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    As for the magical-realist horns, they make a nice bad-boy look for Radcliffe and a handy plot device, but are never really explained in a satisfactory way. They have the side effect of making anyone who sees them immediately forget them — which I suspect may be the case with this movie as well.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    The script’s by Robert Ben Garant, also behind last year’s scary-movie spoof “Hell Baby,” and this one teeters right on the edge of laughable, with its V.C. Andrews-like series of goth twists.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    From time to time, it works.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Heavy on quirk and light on wit, first-time director Gillian Greene’s comedy leans too heavily on the badly wigged Kranz.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    It’s well-executed but familiar territory, with a dearth of jarring moments. Those of us who aren’t friends and family of the crew could use a little wake-up shove here and there.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Hate to say it, but this film ain’t half the satire it could have been.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    For piquing kids’ interest in history and nature, you could do worse than this goofy Ben Stiller franchise. But its third installment is more meh than manic, too reliant on wide shots of the ragtag Museum of Natural History cohorts striding down corridors. You get the feeling returning director Shawn Levy is ready to hang it up.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Sara Stewart
    Aside from these curious role reversals, though, Alex Cross is a mess. Drawing on every conceivable '80s B-movie action cliché and treating its beleaguered female characters like pieces of meat (literally, in one scene of butchery), director Rob Cohen squanders a surprisingly recognizable cast on a half-baked plot adapted from James Patterson's series of novels.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Sara Stewart
    You'd hope a political-insider indie reuniting "West Wing" stars Rob Lowe and Richard Schiff, and informed by the experiences of an actual former spin doctor, would be a small delight. You would be wrong.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 38 Sara Stewart
    This female revenge thriller starts out promisingly, but squanders its girl-power capital quicker than you can say "Rihanna."
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Sara Stewart
    Pineda is lovely, but I stopped believin’ in this documentary long before it was over.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 38 Sara Stewart
    I’ll say one thing for The Call: Its ending is actually a bit of a surprise. Just when you think it couldn’t get any stupider, pow! I’ll be damned, Hollywood, you still have the power to blindside.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Sara Stewart
    There are a lot of casualties in this stylish, unoriginal thriller, but James McAvoy’s knee was the only one that moved me.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 38 Sara Stewart
    None of these seemingly plot-rich questions are explored; instead, we’re stuck with a greasy-haired Mark Ruffalo, as his detective character flounders along in their wake, muttering that he doesn’t have time for this magic crap.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Sara Stewart
    Predicated almost entirely on the repeated juxtaposition of innocent girlishness and mindless violence, Violet & Daisy could still have been campy fun — instead, it wilts for lack of wit.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Sara Stewart
    With the exception of “Tape 49” — the Simon Barrett-directed segment about the PI — the films are ridiculously shaky, their camerawork so determinedly guerrilla-style that it’s difficult not to look away, sometimes at crucial moments. Found footage is all well and good, but if it’s unwatchable, it might as well have stayed lost.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 38 Sara Stewart
    It often seems like an acting workshop: Behave as if you are the parent of a dead child.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Sara Stewart
    A forgettable — and occasionally borderline offensive — animated tale of turkeys trying to take back Thanksgiving.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 38 Sara Stewart
    Shooting in South Africa and Botswana, director Kamaleshwar Mukherjee never lacks for atmosphere, but his film is painfully awkward in execution, from the stiff dialogue to the time-padding slo-mo sequences and glaring CGI.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Sara Stewart
    Ultimately, though, the lack of story and relentless suffering make Raze appealing for hard-core genre fans only.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Sara Stewart
    The dialogue is so vague, and the plot so minimal, it all feels like a rather pointless exercise.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Sara Stewart
    Rockwell is incapable of being boring, so there’s some small entertainment to be found in watching his buttoned-up beta male blossom into full Sam Rockwell.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Sara Stewart
    Like the reanimated corpse of a teen queen, this would-be cult movie looks the part, but has little going on inside.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 38 Sara Stewart
    There’s a secret at play in After, which director Pieter Gaspersz communicates via many side-long glances. I won’t give it away, but it’s a fairly far-fetched twist that feels out of place in this realism-based drama.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 38 Sara Stewart
    First-time feature director Jeff Preiss has a top-notch duo in John Hawkes, as the affable but troubled Joe, and Elle Fanning as his teen daughter, Amy, but neither can really get out from under the film’s heavy-handed tone, a one-note trip down a bleak memory lane.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 25 Sara Stewart
    Parental Guidance kicks off with a mean-spirited joke about an overweight woman and heads downhill from there.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 25 Sara Stewart
    I only laughed once, and it was when Whit Stillman made a cameo to be snubbed by the newly self-actualized Imogene. But it was mostly in disbelief; pretentious or not, Stillman represents a caliber of smart writing that’s wholly absent from Girl Most Likely.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 25 Sara Stewart
    The innovation of Refn’s latest is mostly just in the way it manages to merge gory and boring. At least it’s created a new movie adjective for me: goring.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 25 Sara Stewart
    Like some hybrid beast out of Greek mythology, this young-adult sequel has the body of a “Harry Potter,” the head of a “Twilight,” the feet of a “Hunger Games” and the tail, oddly, of a “Raiders of the Lost Ark.”
    • 34 Metascore
    • 25 Sara Stewart
    Nothing in this movie would actually happen, so what’s irritating is that it presents itself as a savvy, “Am I right, ladies?” dating commentary.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 25 Sara Stewart
    At the start of Insidious 2, a young woman opens her mouth to speak and someone else’s voice comes out of her. Demonic possession? Nope, just some inexplicable dubbing to kick off this clunker of a horror sequel.
    • 12 Metascore
    • 25 Sara Stewart
    Director Anthony Leonardi, in his feature debut, litters the film with inconsistencies.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 25 Sara Stewart
    This overlong drama plays like a threefold infomercial: for Christianity, the cheesy resort chain Sandals and Jeff “Ja Rule” Atkins, the rapper-turned-actor playing drug kingpin Miles Montego.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 25 Sara Stewart
    Minus its smirky twist ending, it’d make perfect material for New York’s new “That’s Abuse” domestic violence awareness campaign.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 25 Sara Stewart
    A clunky movie that feels as if it’s underwritten by the Roman Catholic Church.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 25 Sara Stewart
    With any luck, this’ll be the death knell of the idiot-savant rom-com.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 25 Sara Stewart
    This blathery, misogynist indie from first-time director David Grovic — which seems to be aiming for “Pulp Fiction” territory with its blend of crime, banter and the mysterious contents of a bag — falls far short, rife as it is with noir and gender clichés.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 25 Sara Stewart
    Yelchin is an immensely likable actor who does what he can, but his charm isn’t enough to save this awkwardly worded — and paced — wannabe thriller.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 25 Sara Stewart
    There is virtually nothing in Mac Carter’s horror flick that deviates from the standard haunted house plot (or, in this case, plod).
    • 40 Metascore
    • 25 Sara Stewart
    The dancing’s fine here, but there’s little else to distinguish Make Your Move, an entirely generic drama.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 25 Sara Stewart
    Playing like a script that’s been moldering since Diane Keaton turned it down in 1983, The Other Woman is a weak adultery rom-com in which the most authentic performance comes from a non-housebroken Great Dane.
    • 14 Metascore
    • 25 Sara Stewart
    It makes so little sense on-screen that all you can do is nod along vaguely sympathetically at its sheer creative bravado.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 25 Sara Stewart
    The jovial, hyperverbal comic has played against type before, but his presence feels like epic miscasting in this underwritten dramedy.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 25 Sara Stewart
    This cynical rom-com subgenre has been done to death.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 25 Sara Stewart
    As it stands, there’s little to explain the existence of this confoundingly unfunny film. It’s as if a talented cast (Wilson, Zach Galifianakis, Amy Poehler) assembled to make a comedy and at the last minute was told to play everything straight.
    • 12 Metascore
    • 25 Sara Stewart
    It’s not great art (in fact, it’s pretty low-rent CGI), but it’s passably entertaining.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 25 Sara Stewart
    From its uninspired, sitcom-y look to its phoned-in dialogue (“I love you plus infinity”; “I love you plus double infinity”) to its creaky plot, Hit by Lightning is anything but electrifying.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 25 Sara Stewart
    This crowd-funded — and overcrowded — collection of interwoven stories, directed by John Herzfeld, plays like an amateur-acting exercise in which each participant picks a name and a couple of defining props.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 25 Sara Stewart
    Yes, it’s gross, and no, it’s not remotely original.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 12 Sara Stewart
    The movie lurches from one gross-out scene to another, flipping the bird at continuity and logic. It honestly seems as if Sandler and his team descended on a random suburb, halfheartedly improvising and moving on when they got bored.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 12 Sara Stewart
    No amount of actorly dedication can change the pointlessness of watching unpleasant things happening to uniformly unpleasant people.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 12 Sara Stewart
    If Think Like a Man Too was a man, he would be the world’s worst date: humorless, shrill, speaking primarily in clichés (“what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas!”) and absolutely terrified of women.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 0 Sara Stewart
    Would you rather . . . watch this movie, or spend an hour and a half having your arm hairs plucked out with a rusty pair of tweezers? I’d have chosen the latter if it’d been on offer.
    • 1 Metascore
    • 0 Sara Stewart
    This retrograde sex comedy is embarrassing for just about everyone involved, but I do think a special endurance shout-out should go to Reid Ewing (“Modern Family”).

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