For 228 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Stephen Cole's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 The Pool
Lowest review score: 25 The Virginity Hit
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 28 out of 228
228 movie reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Stephen Cole
    An impressionistic work that is perfectly in tune with its subject’s hallucinatory music.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Stephen Cole
    It is a work of great beauty that rewards continued visits.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Stephen Cole
    A miraculous, American-made Hindi film that is every bit as tranquil as the blue-green reservoir that serves as its abiding metaphor.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Stephen Cole
    A little bit of "Crime and Punishment" and a whole lot of "The Postman Always Rings Twice," Revanche, the Austrian candidate for last year's Best Foreign Language Film, is a surprisingly unruffled tale of love, thievery, murder and revenge.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Stephen Cole
    It is filmmaker Assayas who is the star here. France's most important contemporary director has created a work of almost magisterial calm.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Stephen Cole
    The most gripping war movie you'll see this year, We Were Here tells first-hand the story of how AIDS attacked San Francisco, killing more than 15,000. Whole peer groups were happy, healthy, and then dead in months.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Stephen Cole
    Detective Dee is the action flick of the year, a two-hour epic that blows the "Pirates of the Caribbean" to the Bermuda Triangle.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Stephen Cole
    Chandor's shrewdest bit of business is figuring out how to make an A-list movie with a $3.5-million budget. Solution: buy low, sell high. Hire last decade's A-list – Spacey, Irons and Demi Moore – and give them their best parts in years.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Stephen Cole
    Few directors working today make films with the grace and magisterial power of Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne's best work.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Stephen Cole
    An uncommonly tender and observant documentary on the phenomenon that is "A Chorus Line."
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Stephen Cole
    In classic B-movie style, The Dark Hours was created in a fever, written in two weeks and hurriedly shot in 16 mm (blown into a crisp 35 mm print). Nevertheless, the film provides evidence of talent everywhere.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Stephen Cole
    Noir connoisseurs, however, will receive Moverman's latest like a double-bourbon from heaven. Rampart is the best crime-movie fix from Hollywood since "Gone Baby Gone."
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Stephen Cole
    It is our tour guide that makes Cave of Forgotten Dreams an often thrilling experience. His producer, Erik Nelson, has joked Herzog is the first filmmaker to use 3-D for good, instead of evil. There is no question that the technology enhances our visit, giving perspective and shape to the jagged Chauvet Cave – an open mouth the size of a football field.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Stephen Cole
    As provocative as it is timely.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Stephen Cole
    Another angry, searching document about pedophile priests, Deliver Us from Evil makes for unexpectedly gripping drama.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Stephen Cole
    Nothing short of mesmerizing.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Stephen Cole
    Guy and Madeline is a decidedly modern film, whose frightened, impulsive, charming characters could walk into our lives tomorrow.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Stephen Cole
    An astonishing multimedia diary.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 88 Stephen Cole
    Palindromes is a cracked American picaresque.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Stephen Cole
    For all its fuss and fury, Flight of the Red Balloon succeeds magnificently.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Stephen Cole
    In art there are no rules, just stuff that works. And for the second film in a row, Marsh has created a movie we can't keep our eyes off.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    An anthropological marvel and an animal-drive movie that belongs beside the classics of the genre - Red River and Lonesome Dove.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Though only 85 minutes, the film captures an entire, bewilderingly extended family and way of life inside a sturdy frame.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Von Trier's proficiency at the quicksilver business of comedy comes as a surprise, given the grinding seriousness of earlier films.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Anyone who likes pop music or wonders how bands like the Rolling Stones got rolling will enjoy the ride.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    A welcome rarity: an amiable film comedy that leaves you feeling good as opposed to feeling for your wallet.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    No matter who you side with here, Waste Land – the title should come with a question mark – is a fascinating adventure, populated by memorable characters.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    We don't get a good look at a painting until 35 minutes into the film biography of Séraphine de Senlis, the early 20th-century French painter discovered by German art collector Wilhelm Uhde. The film Séraphine is not about paintings.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Horror fans anticipating grisly laughs are in for a jolt. Because the new Last House, though terrifying, is never, ever fun.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Letting Shrek get grumpy again has freshly animated this cartoon series.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    By hiring James Earl Jones to narrate, Disney has prepared youngsters to understand that man is equally capable of heroism and villainy.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Like "Rebel", directed by Nicholas Ray, this film excels at capturing the nervous posturing of adolescent boys marking their territory by pissing on each other's shoes.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Dragonslayer documents what happened when California stopped dreaming.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    As expected, it has gaping holes where back stories used to be. Still, it's a historical war movie with impressive sweep, strong characterizations and the kind of idiosyncratic flourishes that made Woo such an irresistible storyteller.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    We leave this movie hoping to see Miller and Lewis together again soon.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    It's Duvall and Murray who make Get Low a small, wonderful thing.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    A splendid adventure sure to thrill children and fantasy buffs, while leaving everyone else passably entertained.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Tetro is Coppola's best film since Apocalypse Now because the filmmaker has abandoned conventional drama – what for him had become a straightjacket – indulging in a collage style that allows him to honour favourite filmmakers.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Patricio Guzmán's documentary, Nostalgia for the Light, pays equal attention to the astronomers and searchers, regarding their quest as the same – a search for life.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    The best Brit noir since "Croupier" is a complex, marvellously twisty thriller.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    A film with enough sexy one-liners to tempt Mae West from the grave.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Succeeds because the subject knows she's a showbiz monster and plays her role to the hilt. She's Norma Desmond in "Sunset Blvd." or "Mommie Dearest's" Joan Crawford up from the grave.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    9
    Watching 9 , we know how 8 feels. Sci-fi fans will find heaven in Shane Acker's feature-film debut.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    The Hunting Party does a good job of illustrating Winston Churchill's observation, "There is nothing more exhilarating than to be shot at without result."
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Yes, it’s really complicated, life with the Rizzos. City Island probably has too many moving parts. Still, writer-director Raymond de Felitta (Two Family House) understands that a proper farce, like a good campfire, needs plenty of friction to get started.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    A surprisingly tender look at San Diego Comic-Con.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    The movie's big kick – what makes Enchanted live up to its title – is that the further Giselle progresses in New York, the more we feel like we've tumbled into a timeless Disney Neverland.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Bourne fans will find much to enjoy about The Bourne Legacy, even if they are forced to do without the title character.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    An amused and affectionate look at the writer who formed a crucial link between the New Journalism of the 1960s and today's blogosphere.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    One of this enlightened B-movie's many pleasures is French director Jean-François Richet's handling of atmosphere and setting. Shot almost entirely at night in a blinding snowstorm, the crime drama is an intriguing remodelling of a classic film noir.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Contagion isn't meant to provide delicious roller-coaster chills. Released two days before the 10th anniversary of 9/11, it's a film meant to scare the bejesus out of us.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Warrior is a weirdly affecting hybrid, a 100-proof melodrama that's two-thirds Sylvester Stallone and one-third Eugene O'Neill. Think Rocky's "Long Day's Journey into Night."
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    After witnessing the wearying parliamentary debates among good and bad senators in recent Star Wars episodes, it's a pleasure to watch a sci-fi movie where more than just the spaceships move quickly.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Watching Moon is kind of like seeing a booster rocket thrust seventies' sci-fi films deeper into orbit.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Here's something you don't see every day: a high-school comedy for old poops.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    A chilling film best experienced bundled up in a sweater and scarf.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    The star of Sound of My Voice is co-screenwriter, female lead Brit Marling, who plays Maggie with melancholy, amusement and scorn. Compulsively watchable, she can change who we think she is by simply turning her face. In profile, she's Vanessa Redgrave. Laughing, she becomes Debbie Reynolds. Marling might become a great character actress. Let's hope the movies use her well.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    A stylish, sharply observed erotic mystery.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    The rare sequel that is better than the original.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Few movies have captured the intoxicating effect of pop culture on kids better than Son of Rambow.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    The story of Canada’s tragically unhip – Geddy Lee, Alex Lifeson and Neil Peart, charter members of a group that has sold 40 million or so albums and discs since 1973, without ever getting a whole lotta love. Never mind the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame; Rush never even made it on American TV until funnyman Stephen Colbert invited them on The Colbert Report in 2008.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Starbuck is unapologetic genre filmmaking with a winning performance from its lead, Huard ( Bon Cop, Bad Cop), a shambling, likeable comedian who can flip, flop and fly off a diving board while maintaining his sex appeal.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    A fantastic holiday toy that, amazingly enough, doesn't require batteries.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Handsomely mounted, emotionally involving sci-fi movies don't often show up in the darkened galaxies of our theatre chains. So Alvart's English-language debut is definitely a film you want to catch on the big screen. Just don't sit too close, lest you end up with a dose of pandorum.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    It’s a corny, old fashioned boy-dog love story, as adorable as anything Walt Disney ever signed off on.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    What’s missing in Get Him to the Greek are the supporting characters that made "Forgetting Sarah Marshall" so engaging.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Actress Helen Buday is coolly persuasive in the seesaw role of an unbalanced housewife who jerks from despair to anger.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Todd Solondz isn't for everyone, maybe not even most people...he's a comic filmmaker whose idea of entertainment is shredding chum into a shark tank.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Benefits from one standout performance: Timothy Olyphant ( Deadwood ) plays the part of Nick with ingratiating comic relish.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    As Blank City proves, the all-night, every-night party was fun while it lasted.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    The film's greatest achievement is that it allows us to know Ray.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    The Trotsky goes down easily and, for what it’s worth, is better mannered than most contemporary youth comedies.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    The Intouchables works as a crowd-pleaser not because it's true, but because it's a plausible enchantment.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Michelle Monaghan's clowning response to her boyfriend's sudden histrionics lends the drama a giddy fizz.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    Good Hair is also about how African-Americans spend $9-billion annually chemically treating and straightening their hair, buying 80 per cent of America's hair products. It's such a fascinating, complex tale that you hope one day some probing filmmaker will make a conclusive documentary on the subject.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Stephen Cole
    In a better entertainment world, Owe would have won a special Buster Keaton Great Stoneface award at last year's Academy Awards.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Stephen Cole
    Will Ferrell is a scream, no doubt about it. And Anchorman contains some of his best work. But, Knights of Columbus! Wouldn't it be great if TV-based comedians weren't afraid of making movies that were funnier than they are?
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Stephen Cole
    Death Race is our unshaven Brit hero's inevitable comeuppance: The Prison Job.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Stephen Cole
    The film lacks the comic ingenuity of the best in CGI critter movies. It's not fun-for-the-whole-family, like "Shrek." Still, it's a howl and amazement for anyone under 12.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Stephen Cole
    Once it becomes clear that the new Diary of a Wimpy Kid is an equal-opportunity offender, and that it is the politically correct modern family that is being picked on, rather than young Greg, the film becomes cheerfully mischievous fun for everyone.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Stephen Cole
    Yes, The Mysterious Island is everything a 12-year-old boy could want – endless adventure involving a reckless adolescent hero, with a pretty girl in a clinging T-shirt around to watch him struggle.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Stephen Cole
    The result, which could be entitled There's Something About Curly, is an unabashedly moronic celebration of slap shtick.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Stephen Cole
    For all North Country's blockbuster elements, the film remains a curiously uninvolving affair.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Stephen Cole
    Robocop isn't going to win Verhoeven any medals - the focus remains on action, guns and gore - but it's a flashy movie with enough wit to be more than just another dumb bucket of bolts. [17 Jul 1987]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Stephen Cole
    The film is never as powerful or convincing as it should be.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Stephen Cole
    There is also a capable, wisecracking stewardess (Julianna Margulies) and, what a surprise, a steward who appears to be doing a Paul Lynde impersonation.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Stephen Cole
    It's amazing to see, but potentially unsettling. Green is now 37. And it may be more than some mothers can take, imagining themselves cleaning up after their "little boy" when he's crowding 40.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Stephen Cole
    Trespass is at least a suitable rest stop for his (Cage) anguish. An unapologetic B-movie that comes with lots of flashbacks, gunplay and shouting, it can easily be savoured and forgotten inside 90 minutes.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 63 Stephen Cole
    Your Mommy Kills Animals works best as a fast-moving carnival of faces and feature stories. Like most amusement-park rides, it lets you off dizzy and confused, whereas the best documentaries leave you feeling that you've come to a settled perspective on a subject.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Stephen Cole
    An enjoyable time-waster, distinguished by an unexpectedly sharp comic turn by McConaughey, lots of boisterous horseplay and some stirring emotional clinches. All in all, an entirely serviceable night out for buddies looking to locate hidden feelings.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Stephen Cole
    Jumping the Broom also benefits from a great soundtrack (Al Green, Aretha, El DeBarge, Curtis Mayfield).
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Stephen Cole
    Rallies in the last reel.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Stephen Cole
    If Under the Same Moon is formula melodrama, the film is well acted and its lead character perceptively drawn.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Stephen Cole
    Although In My Country is charged with moments of grace and feeling, the film is ultimately betrayed by the clunky Jackson-Binoche romance.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Stephen Cole
    Alas, the filmmaker, maybe because he had to account for every week of his more than year-long visit to the Times, has crowded his film with too many subplots and way, way too many cameos of all the usual suspects, wringing their hands over what will become of newspapers.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Stephen Cole
    The Israeli film works best in isolated spots early on as a series of intriguing character studies. Upon reaching to become a lesson to the world, however, Walk on Water goes off the deep end.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Stephen Cole
    An okay thriller with lots of smart flourishes, The Next Three Days has us hooked early on but never quite gets us in the boat.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Stephen Cole
    Though often fascinating and beautiful to look at, Surviving Progress falls into the adapting-a-book-into-a-movie trap. Trying to do too much too fast.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Stephen Cole
    There's the roller-disco music and skating, which isn't so much hot as a hoot.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Stephen Cole
    A third of the way into Soul Plane, maybe earlier if you're in the right mood or with the wrong company, you might actually start to enjoy disliking the movie. Like, say, Prince's "Purple Rain," certain Joan Crawford movies, and Leslie Nielsen at his best worst, the film inspires cathartic ridicule.

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