Stephen Holden
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For 1,985 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Stephen Holden's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Hedwig and the Angry Inch
Lowest review score: 0 Grown Ups
Score distribution:
1,985 movie reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    As technically innovative as it is emotionally unsettling.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Exudes a throbbing flesh-and-blood intensity so compelling that it's impossible to avert your eyes.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Although the movie, adapted from a book by Doris Pilkington Garimara, pushes emotional buttons and simplifies its true story to give it the clean narrative sweep of an extended folk ballad, it never goes dramatically overboard.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    For all its narrative glitches and its homemade quality, Thirteen evokes the rhythm, texture and tone of Nina's world in a way that a more carefully scripted film never could.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Even more amusing than "Super Size Me," the documentary that put Mr. Spurlock on the moviemaking map in 2004.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    This is synergy of a high order.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Has the feel of a clinical case study elevated into a subject of aesthetic and philosophical discourse.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    The Magdalene Sisters would be too painful to watch if it didn't have a silver lining. Suffice it to say that it is possible to fly over this religious cuckoo's nest and remain free. All it takes is courage and the timely kindness of strangers.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    With its intense chiaroscuro and meticulous manipulation of color that ranges from stark black and white to richer, shifting hues in scenes set in a metaphorical orchard, the film surpasses even Michael Haneke's "White Ribbon" in the fierce beauty and precision of its cinematography (by Martin Gschlacht).
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Illustrates the underlying fear that when energies that should be directed toward warfare are diverted into passion, unity is impossible.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Despite holes in the storytelling, Ms. Swank and Ms. Rossum keep it real.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    [A] small, likably sentimental film.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    The entrancing visual imagery goes a long way toward filling in the screenplay's gaps in logic.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Remarkable for its seamless ensemble performances.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    If Cremaster 3 is an innovative artwork that has been credited with breaking down the distance between sculpture and film, is it also a great movie? Probably yes.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Working within the confines of the teen-age genre film, Pump Up the Volume succeeds in sounding a surprising number of honest, heartfelt notes.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Gonzalo Arijón’s documentary offers an incontrovertible argument for the necessity of team spirit in the face of catastrophe.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    A gem of contemporary neo-realism, the movie offers a ground-level view of a poor but vital community where many residents survive by scavenging bits of recyclable steel and plastic.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    If the title role of Gabrielle weren’t so fully embodied by its star, Gabrielle Marion-Rivard, this French Canadian movie about love among the disabled would fall on the condescendingly mushy side of the line between heartwarming and saccharine.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    You may become impatient with the leisurely pace of The Invisible Woman and its occasional narrative vagueness, but its open spaces leave room for some of the strongest acting of any contemporary film.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    While you watch the movie, it can seem ridiculously long-winded. But once it's over, its characters' miserable faces remain etched in your memory, and its cynical message lingers.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Powerful sweat-stained swatch of Argentine neo-realism.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Albrecht brings out a side of Mr. Nolte rarely seen on the screen, and he gives a deep and touching portrayal of a haggard, beleaguered older man.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    As operatic cinema, it ranks alongside the best of Martin Scorsese and Francis Ford Coppola.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    The downbeat story unfolds in quick, incisive slashes in which the combination of minimal dialogue and gorgeous black-and-white photography lends the movie a chilly documentary realism.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Bigger, Stronger, Faster* left me convinced that the steroid scandals will abate as the drugs are reluctantly accepted as inevitable products of a continuing revolution in biotechnology. Replaceable body parts, plastic surgery, anti-depressants, Viagra and steroids are just a few of the technological advancements in a never-ending drive to make the species superhuman.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    A quintessential American independent movie, Diggers isn't going to change the history of cinema. But it has integrity. It feels like life.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    What makes the film bearable is the knowledge that a few people did what they could to hold the line against humanity’s worst instincts. The voices in Nanking speak for the persistence of good in times and places where a moral crevice opens to reveal a vision of hell on earth.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    The documentary, which subscribes to the Great Man school of reverential portraiture, is not a biography but an interview (in French, simultaneously translated into English) conceived as a master class on art appreciation, with guest commentators augmenting Cartier-Bresson's own sparsely chosen words.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    The movie's rejection of even a tinge of melodrama lends it a special integrity.

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