Stephen Holden

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For 2,034 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Stephen Holden's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 The Waiting Room
Lowest review score: 0 The Big Bang
Score distribution:
2,034 movie reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Although the movie, adapted from a book by Doris Pilkington Garimara, pushes emotional buttons and simplifies its true story to give it the clean narrative sweep of an extended folk ballad, it never goes dramatically overboard.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Mr. Strathairn's complex, exquisitely nuanced portrayal of a man who goes over the line allows his character to be both hero and villain, sometimes at once.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Brilliantly realized but bone-chillingly bleak.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Shot in just two weeks with a hand-held digital camera, the movie often looks frayed around the edges. Yet it has a soulful heart and a clear grasp of its rarefied milieu (Manhattan upper-level moneyed academia).
    • 45 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Highly entertaining, erotic science-fiction thriller that takes Mr. Crowe into Steven Spielberg territory.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    A grim, disquieting mood piece.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Sustains such a palpable mood of foreboding until the end.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    The entrancing visual imagery goes a long way toward filling in the screenplay's gaps in logic.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    It would be foolish for a middle-class do-gooder confronting homeless children on the streets of Rio de Janeiro to expect conventional morality to have any meaning to them at all. That's one of the blunt, no-nonsense observations of Yvonne Bezarra de Mello, the Brazilian human rights activist profiled in Monika Treut's hard-headed documentary.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    If the situation has all the ingredients of a shrill, tearful melodrama, the filmmaker, working from a taut screenplay by Avner Bernheimer that doesn't waste a word or a gesture, keeps the emotional lid firmly in place.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    A very funny for-kids-of-all-ages delight that should catapult Mr. Black straight to the top of the A-list of Hollywood funnymen.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Makes a jolly absurdist stew out of its sources.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    As these tumultuous events play out in the film... they generate the suspense of a smaller-scale "Seven Days in May."
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    As unrelenting an exploration of isolation and dissociation as Roman Polanski's "Repulsion."
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    The son's search is one of three strands of a story that the movie weaves into a meticulously structured portrait of a complicated man who remains elusive even after key elements of the puzzle have been pieced together.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    It works just fine as a sophisticated wildlife documentary with a submerged narrative. But if you enjoy the challenge of solving difficult mysteries, Hukkle presents a tantalizing case waiting to be cracked.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    It's about individuals, not about sensations. If the characters' backgrounds are not examined in detail, the movie still conveys an intimate sense of who they are and their emotional connections.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Powerful sweat-stained swatch of Argentine neo-realism.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    A small, finely wrought drama.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    A skillful assemblage of newsreel clips, cartoons ridiculing the American interlopers, television commercials and interviews with power officials and ordinary Georgians. It gives new and darker meaning to that comfy adage "We're all connected."
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    The man who emerges is a likable, unpretentious musical enthusiast and roll-up-your-sleeves problem-solver who apparently led a charmed life.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    The movie's sense of emotional claustrophobia is underscored by a complete lack of interest in Middle Eastern politics, or in anything outside the troubled family unit.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Blurs the line between comedy and epic drama so adroitly that the two styles fuse into something quite original: a lyrical farce that pays homage to its period in any number of ways.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    While you watch the movie, it can seem ridiculously long-winded. But once it's over, its characters' miserable faces remain etched in your memory, and its cynical message lingers.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    What distinguishes Raja from every other movie to contemplate the treacherous intersection of passion, avarice and power is its unsettling emotional honesty. The two central performances are so spontaneous and mercurial that the reckless flirtation seems to be unfolding before your eyes.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Although the movie takes on many of the characteristics of a conventional thriller, it refuses to go for cheap, vicious shocks, and the adults are seen through the curtain of Michele's trust.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    The remarkable if overlong Korean film Oasis strips away much of the sentimentality and goody-two-shoes attitudes that the movies traditionally display toward disabled people.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    A cinematic tone poem as much as a biography.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Exudes a throbbing flesh-and-blood intensity so compelling that it's impossible to avert your eyes.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    As Mark Li Ping-bing's beautiful cinematography observes the change of season, the movie becomes a broader meditation on rebirth, and how, in the language of T. S. Eliot, April, the month that stirs such hopes for the future, is also "the cruellest month" for awakening such keen desire.

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