Stephen Holden

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For 2,193 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Stephen Holden's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Taxidermia
Lowest review score: 0 Alone in the Dark
Score distribution:
2193 movie reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Frustratingly sketchy partly because it is not finally a survival tale but a mystical evocation of the power of Inuit mythology, and how the passing down of ancient wisdom can sustain the human spirit in the direst circumstances. But the unanswered questions still nag.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    This hilarious fake documentary -- deserves a place beside the comedies of Christopher Guest in the hall of fame of semi-deadpan spoofs.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    One of the thrills of the movie is watching the improvisatory trial-and-error process as the dancers explore psychological themes, contorting their graceful, amazingly limber bodies into visual representations of relationships and emotional states.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Faced an insoluble problem: how do you make a boundary-shattering gross-out farce about the porn business that isn't itself pornographic? Having the actors wear silly costumes embellished with sex toys just won't do the trick.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    Near the beginning of the movie, the younger Wexler admits that the film is his attempt to get closer to his father. This sense of personal mission helps make Tell Them Who You Are the richest documentary of its kind since Terry Zwigoff's "Crumb."
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    It's when The Deal leaves the corporate offices behind that the story turns into a bogus, convoluted mess. Once the Russian mafia, personified by Angie Harmon playing an evil seductress with a terrible Russian accent, rears its head, the ballgame is over.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Stephen Holden
    The profound pleasures they offer derive not only from their deft metaphysical playfulness but also from their storytelling genius.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    As the movie jumps back and forth in time, it displays an impressive cut-and-paste agility, skillfully interweaving humor and drama without tipping over into farce or soap opera.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Certainly an honorable film. But honorable is not always watchable.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Whether you like or loathe Mr. Dumont’s movies, his unsettling vision of humanity stripped of cultural finery feels profoundly truthful.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Soon after that the movie simply stops dead in its tracks, as though the money had run out and the project had been called off in the middle of a scene that makes no psychological or dramatic sense. It leaves you frustrated and annoyed.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    It may not go anywhere in particular, but it is as exciting as a trip through a well-equipped, scary fun house.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Funny Games observes the family's excruciating terror and suffering with the patient delight of a cat luxuriantly toying with a mouse that it is in the process of slowly killing. Posing as a morally challenging work of art, the movie is a really a sophisticated act of cinematic sadism. You go to it at your own risk.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The belated sentimentality of the movie is as thudding as its fire-and-brimstone moralism; they're really two sides of the same counterfeit coin.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Never disrespectful. It leaves you liking and even admiring the people of Massillon for their spunk and their passionate commitment to carrying on a hallowed tradition.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Stagedoor is like leafing through a collection of snapshots assembled with few captions and no text.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Although there is the germ of a very sharp comedy in the intersection of real mobsters and make-believe thugs in a Hollywood mob comedy, Analyze That is far too lazy to do much with it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    The movie offers an encouraging vision of old age in which the depression commonly associated with decrepitude is held at bay by music making, camaraderie and a sense of humor.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    A crude but stirring video documentary filmed over last year and this by Amos Poe, while Mr. Earle and his band were on tour.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    The cinematic equivalent of a visit from a cherished but increasingly dithery maiden aunt.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Dense, exhilarating.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Captures the vulnerability and aimlessness of its unfortunate characters with a heart-in-your-throat rawness that recalls some of the more poignant moments of Italian neo-realist cinema.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    Even by the crude standards of teenage horror, Final Destination is dramatically flat.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Tries to do too much in too little time. It would be a stronger film if it devoted more detailed attention to the plight of the returning veteran. As it stands, it is a scattershot antiwar polemic that doesn't bolster its arguments with any historical perspective or statistical evidence. No one from the government or the military is trotted out to give an opposing view. This is not to say that The Ground Truth, on its own terms, isn't devastating.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Because The Nanny Diaries is essentially a two-character story whose supporting players are wooden props, it would help if the actors playing the two were evenly matched. But Ms. Johansson’s Annie, who narrates the movie in a glum, plodding voice, is a leaden screen presence, devoid of charm and humor.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    War/Dance, in spite of its slickness, is an honorable, sometimes inspiring exploration of the primal healing power of music and dance in an African tribal culture.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The gentle, upbeat documentary Throw Down Your Heart chronicles the African pilgrimage of the American banjo virtuoso Béla Fleck in search of the origins of his chosen instrument.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    The major miscalculation in Wonderful World is the presence of a dream figure, known as the Man (Philip Baker Hall)...he throws this delicate, intelligent film, which at its best suggests a muted hybrid of “The Visitor” and “It’s a Wonderful Life,” off balance.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Had it exhibited a modicum of restraint, The Forsaken could have been twice as scary.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    With a cackling nihilistic glee, the movie rubs our faces in the stinking, screaming muck of raw human appetite and insists that that's all there is.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    This version of The Mummy has no pretenses to be anything other than a gaudy comic video game splashed onto the screen.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    With its many unsolved mysteries, WXIII joins a long list of film-noir projects that end up stranded in the maze of their own invention.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    The low-key realism is so meticulously maintained that Summer in Berlin feels somewhat trivial. There is nothing larger here than meets the eye. It is "Sex and the City" on a stringent budget with fewer characters.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Jessica Yu’s enthralling documentary exploration of people with obsessive needs for control and self-mastery.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    You might blame Nora Ephron, whose screenplay for “When Harry Met Sally” established the formula that I Hate Valentine’s Day runs into the ground. Compared with this, Ms. Ephron is Chekhov.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    In Ms. Mirren's first film to be directed by her husband, Taylor Hackford, since "White Nights" in 1985, her formidable dramatic resources can't camouflage flat writing that eventually veers into gloppy sentimentality. At times even Ms. Mirren, who adopts a regionless American accent, seems uncomfortable.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Probably the first romantic drama ever narrated by a smelly dead fish.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    This movie is a more conventional, but also more believable, exploration of the potential cost of thumbing your nose at society.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Mr. Bana's Chopper is so scarily convincing that he makes you feel the eruptive force of each mood swing and the way his character's paranoia, egomania and conscience- stricken apologies are part of a volatile emotional cycle.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The vital signs in Love Happens, a movie that feels likes a laboriously padded outline, are faint.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    A lip-synching hall of mirrors, it is essentially a piece of highbrow karaoke.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The uninitiated viewer can admire it simply for the majesty of its visual poetry.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Rob Schneider runs an obstacle course of taste and emerges remarkably unsullied, considering the choices he faces.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Stephen Holden
    Extraordinary labor of love.
    • 9 Metascore
    • 0 Stephen Holden
    Even by the standards of its bottom-feeding genre, Dirty Love clings to the gutter like a rat in garbage.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    In its quiet, literate way, the film is almost as subversive as its central character.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    The movie has only the most tenuous connection with reality. But the same could be said of classic 30's screwball comedies in which the treacherous feints and ploys of the mating game are transmuted into witty, romantically charged repartee.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Stephen Holden
    By surrendering any semblance of rationality to create a post-Freudian, pulp-fiction fever dream of a movie, Mr. Lynch ends up shooting the moon with Mulholland Drive.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    With its off-center dialogue and upscale industrial settings, Gigantic strains to be original. But beneath its indie affectations it is really another contemplation of generational misunderstanding.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    As with the 70's films of Terrence Malick, one of Undertow's producers, the more intoxicated it becomes with rural desolation and fecundity, the more deeply in touch it puts you with its characters' souls.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Dramatically skimpy, even though the movie stirs together themes of love, sex, death and war.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    This season's answer to "Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas," it's an overstuffed grab bag in which lumps of coal are glued together with melted candy.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Doesn't have a genuinely human moment.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Superbly acted, without a trace of coyness and with considerable heat.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Transfixing in the way that well-told life-and-death adventure tales inevitably are. It is the film’s more mundane elements -- an awkward, under-nourished love story and half-baked politics -- that are problematic.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Has only the most tangential relation to reality, and therein lies its slender charm.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    What's really so appealing about the characters is their resemblance to everyday children. They're wildly energetic, competitive and (sometimes dangerously) impulsive. But they also learn from their mistakes, and their instincts are good. More power to them.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    The sweet, solemn music of George Harrison, who died two years ago, has rarely sounded more majestic than in the sweeping performances of the enlarged star-studded band that gathered in London at Royal Albert Hall on Nov. 29 to commemorate his legacy.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Not likely to spur much tourism to Greece. The sights, though impressive, are not photographed interestingly, and the citizens of the host country are less than welcoming.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Whether you find its dual resolution hopelessly pretentious or profound depends on your tolerance for a certain strain of Gallic sentimentality that takes itself more seriously than it lets on.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The film, which Mr. Rodger directed, wrote, produced and photographed on location in nearly two dozen countries, is the documentary equivalent of a spiritually angled coffee-table book of world travels
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Larry (Wild Man) Fischer, the psychotic songwriter and performer (found to be both paranoid-schizophrenic and bipolar) is sympathetically profiled in Josh Rubin's documentary.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    A misanthropic dentist, a roguish ghost and a zany Egyptologist: as these unlikely companions scamper around Manhattan in the buoyant comedy Ghost Town, they resurrect the spirits of classic movie curmudgeons like W. C. Fields and such romantic comedians as Cary Grant and Carole Lombard in Woody Allen territory.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    A 1950's movie magazine fantasy dressed up just enough to pass for contemporary.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    So clogged with kooky gadgetry and special effects and glitter and goo that watching it feels like being gridlocked at Toys "R" Us during the Christmas rush.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    The movie is so busy applying cute touches to everything and everybody that it forgets to devote enough attention to the souls Michael has come down to save.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Although there's plenty of opportunity for low comedy in the notion of an emperor and an oaf exchanging roles, The Emperor's New Clothes, much to its detriment, doesn't pursue them.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    For all its energy and fine acting, Tycoon has a frustrating lack of narrative coherence.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    What Darfur Now offers is a collective vision of actions, small and large, taken on many fronts, to end the crisis. The movie is a quiet, methodical call to action.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    A cream puff with a melted marshmallow inside it. As the temperature rises, the whole gooey thing starts to melt.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    With a merciless acuity this nihilistic comedy ridicules collective grief and the news media's cynical marketing of inspirational uplift after a death.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    The Last New Yorker would like to think of itself as a comic fairy tale, but Lenny’s pride and self-delusion are too pathetic to be amusing.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Milk and Honey is the kind of nightmare-in-a-box you might expect if Neil LaBute remade Martin Scorsese's "After Hours" on a shoestring.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    This is a hiss-the-villain, cheer-the-hero kind of movie.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Morris, instead of evoking the solemnity that surrounds most films that touch on the Holocaust, has directed Mr. Death as the blackest of comedies.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    An uproariously dizzy satire...Hedaya has created the year's funniest film caricature.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    If Ms. Bynes keeps going in this direction, she can conceivably develop a gallery of characters as rich and varied as Tracey Ullman's.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Mendelsohn's fusion of science fiction and Chekhovian melancholy finds a fresh perspective on a familiar theme.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The jocular screen adaptation of the 2005 best seller "Freakonomics: a Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything" is a shallow but diverting alternative to the book.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    More than an indelible portrait of a sociopath with the soul of a zombie, Tony Manero is an extremely dark meditation on borrowed cultural identity.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Piles too many small disasters on top of the initial tragedy, including a drunken car accident, a drug bust and a cancer scare. It also swerves unsteadily into farce.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    If Dot the i, the directorial debut of Matthew Parkhill, has a crass visual flash, it fails to give its characters any credible substance. Even after it purports to eviscerate their psyches, they remain diagrammatic contrivances.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A smart, sardonic satire.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    The movie's unhurried rhythm eventually works a quiet spell, and after a while you find yourself settling back, adjusting to the film's bucolic metabolism and appreciating its eye and ear for detail.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    However authentic and heartfelt this film's depiction of life on the meaner streets of the Northeast corridor may be, it doesn't begin to match "The Sopranos'" epic vision of violence, class struggle and upward mobility in a barbarous culture.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    An amiably klutzy affair whose warm, fuzzy heart emits intermittent bleats from the sleeve of its gleaming spacesuit.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Pressure Cooker belongs to the honorable if overpopulated genre of inspirational films (both documentaries and features) dedicated to the proposition that one committed, passionate teacher can make all the difference in the lives of disadvantaged students.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    Played in a loud sketch-comedy style that might be described as "Gay Mad TV." The haranguing, badly acted farce wears out its comic welcome within half an hour.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Dark Days illustrates even the worst nightmare can have descending levels of horror.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    All it wants is to divert you for about 100 minutes and leave you with the glow of vicarious comradeship, as blue-collar blokes and drag queens pull together to save the day. Foot fetishists will drool.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    One of the most disquieting (and challenging) statistics is left for last: if Africa's share of world trade increased by only one percentage point, it would generate $70 billion a year, five times what the continent receives in aid. Who wouldn't want that?
    • 27 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    Most of the meager charms of the chaotic romantic farce A Guy Thing spring from the deft comic contortions of Hollywood's ultimate nerdy sidekick, Jason Lee.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    Not since "Y Tu Mamá También" has a movie so palpably captured the down-to-earth, flesh-and-blood reality of high-spirited people living their lives without self-consciousness.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    An undeniably impressive visual spectacle that follows the sport of extreme skiing.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Watching Ms. Zellweger’s joyless performance, you have to wonder what happened to this formerly charming actress who not so long ago seemed on the verge of becoming a softer, more vulnerable Shirley MacLaine.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The film leaves you with a sense that Kastner’s name is a casualty of rhetorical crossfire.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Neither funny nor sexy, nor leavened by the wistful laissez-faire wisdom of the typical sophisticated Gallic comedy, it is less than a trifle.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    An unusually pure example of American kitchen-sink realism.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Fatal culture clash, imperialist entitlement, forbidden passion between master and servant: the ingredients of the Indian director Santosh Sivan’s period piece Before the Rains may be awfully familiar, but the film lends them the force of tragedy.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Highly entertaining, erotic science-fiction thriller that takes Mr. Crowe into Steven Spielberg territory.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    A peppy romantic trifle from France that rises above the mundane on the strength of its beautifully detailed lead performances.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    It adds up to an entertaining collection of vignettes strung together by a sarcastic loudmouth whose heart is breaking under his sophomoric bravado.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 0 Stephen Holden
    A convoluted, hysterical mess of a movie with grandiose spiritual airs and not a drop of humor.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Tidy, predictable, excruciatingly fussy in its details and lacking the tiniest glimmer of humor, The Life Before Her Eyes contradicts the director’s claim in the production notes that the movie “is not a perfectly ordered experience with clear causes and effects.”
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    Beautifully written and acted, Tell No One is a labyrinth in which to get deliriously lost.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    A bland, well-meaning mishmash that never coheres into a dramatic whole.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Until the end, when it begins to go soft, the movie takes two strands of soap opera convention -- a life-changing accident and an adulterous affair -- and spins their suds into gold.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Stephen Holden
    One of the most insightful and wrenching portraits of the joys and tribulations of being a classical musician ever filmed.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    What the movie lacks is contrast. The sped-up ribbons of traffic in a city look as pretty as the interior of a redwood grove. As for the perils of logging, one brief shot of a clear-cut forest flashes by so quickly it is almost subliminal.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    If Ms. Smith's and Mr. Hoffman's mopey, sheepish performances are quite convincing and ultimately sad, the movie constructed around them doesn't really know what it wants to say or how to say it.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    In trying to be both bold and nonthreatening, the movie ends up seeming tame and mildly offensive.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    A gripping and important documentary.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    By the time it reaches a weak, ambiguous conclusion, the movie has gone everywhere and nowhere, much like its psychotic main character, Bob Maconel (Christian Slater).
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Everything she (Spears) does seems diluted and secondhand and is never transformed into something original or indelibly self-expressive.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    The saving graces of the film, written and directed by Chris Kennedy, are its performances, especially Mr. Roxburgh's portrayal of a floundering lost soul with little to show for an itinerant life, and Ms. Otto's ditsy, mercurial and ultimately touching country singer.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    There is enough discomfort on display to reinforce the cynical adage that sex is God's joke.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    Death in Love hasn't a drop of humor or hope. Its dull, smudged look makes every environment appear joyless and claustrophobic.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    The performances are so skillful that the actors almost carry it off. But as the shocks come thicker and faster, the credibility of The Intended, wears away.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Its satire is too broad to carry much of a sting.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    So intent on pushing its virtuous agenda that its characters often sound like mouthpieces parroting predigested attitudes.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Never regains that initial blast of energy and the final scenes wobble toward a wishy-washy ending.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Feels too cramped, indoorsy and bloodless to catch romantic fire.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Plays as an enthralling but implausible Asian soap opera.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    A facile exercise in nihilism posing as an indie "Training Day" with street cred. Don't believe it.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A textbook example of seat-of-the-pants guerrilla filmmaking.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Ms. Lane has the role of her career in Connie, and her indelible (and ultimately sympathetic) performance is both archetypal and minutely detailed.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A movie so profoundly in touch with its own feelings that it transcends its formulaic tics.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    If the attention span of Charlie Bartlett didn’t wander here and there, the movie might have been a high school satire worthy of comparison with Alexander Payne’s “Election.” But as it dashes around and eventually turns soft, it loses its train of thought.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The real message: Life's ultimate pleasure lies in extreme fighting - to the death.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    A suds-filled political melodrama that bashes the Roman Catholic Church in Mexico with a contempt that verges on hysteria, could be accused of many things, but timidity is not one of them.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    After spinning out metaphors of paralysis and eroticism in its characters' feverish imaginations, Quid Pro Quo decides at the last minute that it has to explain everything. The moment it pulls away from the fantastic, it lands with a thud.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Even for a fairy tale, A Cinderella Story, directed by Mark Rosman from a screenplay by Leigh Dunlap, fails to make sense.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Despite its moments of pathos and its expressions of homesickness, A Room and a Half, is an uplifting comedy. Like Fellini’s screen reminiscences, it is suffused with a hearty appreciation of the world’s absurdity, along with a hungry appreciation of its beauty.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The Jackal, like most expensive thrillers nowadays, knows how to do gadgets, pyrotechnics, underground subway chases and panicked crowd scenes. But except for Mr. Gere's uphill battle, it has only the vaguest idea of how to do people.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    This zippy Disney adventure-comedy, crammed with special effects, asks that age-old rhetorical question, "Is there life after high school?," and answers it with a cheerful "Not really."
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Has the rambling pace of an episodic 1950s costume drama.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Ms. Khoury, often filmed in close-up, gives a deeply sensitive, unsentimental performance, and the feelings that crowd on her face (sometimes more than one at a time) run the gamut from despair to ambivalence to hysterical frustration to tenderness and joy.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    As this taut, viscerally propulsive insider's history of the sport in its early years skids and leaps forward with a jaunty visual panache, it is impossible not to be seduced by its hard-edged vision of an endless teenage summer.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    When F. Scott Fitzgerald remarked that the rich “are different from you and me,” he might have been thinking of someone like the moody billionaire from Fierce People.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    If the situation has all the ingredients of a shrill, tearful melodrama, the filmmaker, working from a taut screenplay by Avner Bernheimer that doesn't waste a word or a gesture, keeps the emotional lid firmly in place.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    A crude but scathing portrait of suburban life.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Stirringly romantic...a gripping period thriller that clicks along without resorting to hyped-up shock effects or gimmicky suspense.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The upbeat ending can't erase the lingering aura of being trapped in an insane asylum with the Manson family.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The fact that her story of triumph over unimaginable odds doesn't come freighted with mystical and religious bromides makes it all the more inspiring.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    This much sweetness and light in a movie is all very well. But there's a reason that recipes for cake and cookies call for a pinch of salt. In Miss Potter, there is only a grain or two -- not enough to dilute the sugary overload. The film is the cinematic equivalent of a delicate English tea cake whose substance is buried under too many layers of icing.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    That Flipped isn't insufferably cute is a measure of its integrity. But it still strains to view the world through the eyes of children without a filter of grown-up cynicism. It is plodding and awkwardly paced.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    XXY
    If XXY is imagistically too programmatic (a scene of carrots being sliced is typical of its Freudian heavy-handedness) and devoid of humor, it never seems pruriently exploitative. It sustains an unsettling mood of ambiguity that lingers long after the final credits.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 0 Stephen Holden
    This imbecilic, mean-spirited farce, which sneers at adults, leaves you wondering: where are the Three Stooges when we really need them?
    • 47 Metascore
    • 10 Stephen Holden
    The queasiness produced by this sentimental weepie builds into a wave of nausea during its interminable finale.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    Brilliant, over-the-edge concert film Notorious C.H.O. carries candid sexual humor into previously uncharted territory.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Instead of feeling universal, the movie feels claustrophobic.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Crackles dangerously to life whenever Constance (who narrates the film) is on the screen with her father Hank (Terry Kinney).
    • 21 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    Homecoming is coldly efficient for what it is. But what it is is trash.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    A thuddingly blunt contemporary morality tale devoid of wit and only minimally suspenseful.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Everything that happens in the last half-hour betrays the canny, hardheaded perspective of what came before.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    A chilly machine-tooled comedy.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    A largely incoherent movie that generates little suspense and relies for the majority of its thrills on close-up gore.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    As this smart, hard-bitten woman with an eighth-grade education pursues her quest, the documentary portrays the debate between connoisseurship and science as a culture war.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    If Invincible is soft at the center, its visual grandeur and mostly full-blooded performances make it gripping, for this eminent German director has pulled off the tricky feat of elevating a true story into a larger-than-life allegory.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    What distinguishes Raja from every other movie to contemplate the treacherous intersection of passion, avarice and power is its unsettling emotional honesty. The two central performances are so spontaneous and mercurial that the reckless flirtation seems to be unfolding before your eyes.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Michael Kang's small, perfectly observed portrait of Ernest Chin (Jeffrey Chyau), a Chinese-American boy who lives and works in a dingy downscale motel operated by his mother, captures the glum desperation of inhabiting the biological limbo of early adolescence.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    Mr. Malkovich is one of the few actors capable of conveying genuine intellectual depth.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The novelty of hearing Ms. Bonham Carter spew four-letter words fades quickly. So does the sight of Mr. Branagh elaborately rehearsing how to rob a bank. This versatile actor has many strengths, but as his wooden turn in ''Celebrity'' has already demonstrated, comedy isn't one of them.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A cast that chews the scenery with such obvious enjoyment that you're happy to put up with its tin-eared oratory and preposterous plot turns for the sake of a good ride.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    A tedious World War II epic that slogs across the screen like a forced march in quicksand.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    For Ms. Watts, it is a small, brave acting tour de force.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    If the film's sentiments about the madness of war are impeccably high-minded, why then does Joyeux Noël, an Oscar nominee for best foreign-language film, feel as squishy and vague as a handsome greeting card declaring peace on earth?
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    The movie's disparate voices coalesce here as an emotionally charged microcosm of the conflict.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Much of the film is a nearly wordless tone poem that sustains an intense emotional gravity and sexual tension through its mixture of music, beautiful outdoor cinematography and somber, silent acting.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    With the dog days of August upon us, think of this dog of a movie as the cinematic equivalent of high humidity.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A piercingly poignant then-and-now portrait of five friends.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The role, one of the meatiest of Mr. Rush's career, is equal in flash and complexity to his turns as the pianist David Helfgott in "Shine" and the Marquis de Sade in "Quills."
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    An emotionally and politically loaded allegory.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Filmed in less than three weeks, Man Push Cart is an exemplary work of independent filmmaking carried out on a shoestring. Mr. Razvi’s convincing performance is a muted portrait of desolation bordering on despair.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Because Stevie has none of the glamour of "Hoop Dreams," with its portrait of gifted teenage athletes struggling for glory, it is not nearly as likable a film; but in its earnest, plodding way it is every bit as deep.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Dark Matter, with its view of cutthroat politics and competing egos inside a university, is also laudable in its refusal to soft-pedal the viciously petty side of the academic fishbowl.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    With some staggeringly beautiful photography of cherry blossoms and scarlet autumn leaves, Dolls is so enthralled with its own cinematography that it can't bear to edit itself, and during the autumn and winter segments of the bound beggars' journey, it almost reaches a standstill.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    All you really need to know about Say It Isn't So,the latest flatulent noisemaker from the Farrelly Brothers' gross-out comedy factory, is that late in the movie, Chris Klein punches a cow from behind and finds his arm stuck inside.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Because The Matador sustains a tone of screwball insouciance and keeps its trump card hidden up its sleeve, it must be counted as a well-made comic thriller. That doesn't mean it has any depth, credibility or artistic value beyond its capacity to divert.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    A Good Year is a three-P movie: pleasant, pretty and predictable. One might add piddling.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The upshot is a whopper of an ending that is as silly as it is satisfying.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Shot in a quasi-documentary style at the actual locations where the events took place, including the sidewalk outside the Dakota, the movie is extremely uncomfortable to watch.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    An occasionally savvy farce that suffers from attention deficit disorder.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Far from being a typical Hollywood desecration of a difficult play, it stays true to the work's quirky, renegade spirit.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The lives of Olivia, Tomo, Milot and Joey converge in a climactic chase sequence as frantic as a Keystone Cops movie. By this time, grim realism has curdled into bleakly absurdist farce.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Not a pleasant film, but it is deeply, scarily rewarding.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    You probably won't feel comfortable when Humanité is over, but as you leave the theater you will feel more alive than when you entered.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Bulletproof, directed by Ernest Dickerson from a screenplay by Joe Gayton and Lewis Colick, is really a screwball love story disguised as a macho action film.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Compacted into an 80-minute mishmash of interviews, confessions and sketches, melded into a shaky mosaic, the answers from a cross section of men are shallow, self-serving and ultimately unenlightening.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    For all its spikiness, there are hurdles that La Petite Lili cannot overcome. Abridged and abbreviated, Chekhov's leisurely philosophic reflections evoke a musty aroma of pressed flowers in a scrapbook that is out of tune with the times.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Going Shopping, like Mr. Jaglom's other movies, has enough smart, knowing touches and enough easy spontaneity among its well-chosen actors to make you wish it added up to more than what it turns out to be: a flighty, motor-mouthed cinematic divertissement.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    One long, 1980s-style inspirational cliche.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Stephen Holden
    Ms. Kidman, in a performance of astounding bravery, evokes the savage inner war waged by a brilliant mind against a system of faulty wiring that transmits a searing, crazy static into her brain.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    A cinematic tone poem as much as a biography.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Seems refreshing, even mildly subversive.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    A dense biographical collage.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The film, to its credit, never tries to pluck your heartstrings. As it follows the Geldharts around New York, they are figures in a meditative dialogue on human values that reaches no easy conclusions.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    The movie's dramatic climax is a father-son confrontation of stunning cruelty. Although the movie stops short of outright tragedy, it is suffused with a grief born of rifts that may never be mended.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    An inspiring demonstration of that old saw about necessity being the mother of (in this case, artistic) invention.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    Ms. Hunt's eye for detail has the precision of a short story writer's. She misses nothing.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The spectacle of two mature stars forced to grovel in the bathroom for cheap laughs is pathetic.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    It mocks the absurdity of war, but between the chuckles, and especially near the end, it plucks the heartstrings.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Stephen Holden
    Belongs to a school of Central European surrealism that marries nightmarish horror with formal beauty.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    There are enough intersecting characters from different classes and backgrounds in Paris to evoke the city as a complex, healthy organism, whose parts are all connected. If it is too lighthearted to show the actual political and economic machinery behind it, its celebration of how well that machinery works produces a pleasant afterglow.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    A powerfully acted but strident road movie.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    Mr. Sarsgaard gives the riskiest screen performance of his career. Save perhaps for Sean Penn's outbursts in "Dead Man Walking" and "Mystic River," no actor in a recent American film has delivered as explosive a depiction of a man emotionally blasted apart.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    This misty-eyed Southern nostalgia piece, in treading the line between sappy and sanguine, winds up mired in tear-drenched quicksand.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Because Chutney Popcorn knows its characters deeply enough to let them determine events, it rises above formula. It is also unusually well acted.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    This is the exceedingly rare film that understands how lonely, insecure preadolescent children can become so consumed by their feelings that they lose sight of ordinary boundaries and unconsciously act out their parents' darkest fantasies of passion and revenge.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    Turns into a meticulously choreographed bang-by-the-numbers action fantasy that I would accuse of peddling evil if the film weren't so dumb and incoherent.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    As gamely as the movie tries to make sense of its title character, there remains a huge gap between the film's creepy, clean-cut Dahmer (Jeremy Renner) and fiendish acts that no amount of earnest textbook psychologizing can bridge.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    It would be foolish for a middle-class do-gooder confronting homeless children on the streets of Rio de Janeiro to expect conventional morality to have any meaning to them at all. That's one of the blunt, no-nonsense observations of Yvonne Bezarra de Mello, the Brazilian human rights activist profiled in Monika Treut's hard-headed documentary.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    By the end of this reflective, wise, often hilarious movie, you feel as though he (McElwee) has slapped a huge chunk of raw, palpitating life onto the screen.
    • 13 Metascore
    • 10 Stephen Holden
    A preposterous, prurient whodunit.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The Perfect Storm is no "Titanic."
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Had it taken a more hard-headed approach, 3 Needles, might have been to the AIDS epidemic what "Traffic" was to the drug trade.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Teenage horror-movie spoof, John Waters parody, No Nukes protest movie, twisted sex-education film, quasi-feminist fable, outrageous stunt: Mitchell Lichtenstein’s clever, crude comedy, Teeth, is all these and more.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    A supernatural thriller so mechanically inept and lacking in suspense that it doesn't even pass muster as lowbrow Halloween-ready entertainment.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    For all its visual zaniness and its aura of psychic imbalance, the movie, which won the Discovery Award at the Toronto International Film Festival last year, stays on the surface and never locates its own heart of darkness.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    The movie never recovers from its jarring turn into a rushed, unconvincing caper movie with a blasé, Robin Hood attitude.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    It is best appreciated as an immersion in a three-dimensional toyland outfitted with enough whimsical gadgetry to fill a thousand playrooms.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 100 Stephen Holden
    A lean and mean horror comedy classic.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    For Mr. Lurie, who specializes in political subjects, Resurrecting the Champ is an encouraging return to film following the rise and fall of his television series "Commander in Chief."
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    A business course on cutthroat capitalism disguised as a slacker comedy: That’s the kindest way to describe Michael Lehmann’s Flakes.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    Not a horror movie but a witty, expertly constructed psychological thriller.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Watching Paul Cox's impressionistic film based on the diaries of that legendary dancer and choreographer, it is impossible not to contemplate with a shudder the shadowy line between art, ecstasy and psychosis.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    The current of intellectual energy snapping through the ferociously engaging screen adaptation of Alan Bennett’s Tony Award-winning play feels like electrical brain stimulation.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    A movie that knows its audience. Its underlying philosophy might be: why try harder when this is all they expect?
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Mary Lambert, who directed the original Pet Sematary, has returned for the sequel, which, like its forerunner, is much better at special effects than at creating characters or telling a coherent story.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    If Down Periscope, directed by David S. Ward, has the ingredients for a lively spoof of everything from Mutiny on the Bounty to Crimson Tide, they are slapped together so crudely that nothing gels, including any sense of a coherent ensemble. The tone of the acting, which is set by Mr. Grammer's blandly laid-back performance, is all wrong for a genre that demands over-the-top hamming.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    It may sound facetious, but Winged Migration provides such an intense vicarious experience of being a flapping airborne creature with the wind in its ears that you leave the theater feeling like an honorary member of another species.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The movie's staunchly liberal point of view extends to the 2000 presidential election, which is shown unfolding in the background. Al Gore's concession speech is used to suggest that the systemic racism in Melody is a symptom of a broader climate of injustice.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    Despite its occasional flashes of brilliance (every Rudolph film has them), this unsavory stew never comes to a boil.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    What saves Train of Life from sinking into sudsy Holocaust kitsch is its sustained comic buoyancy.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Because Kids in America can't decide whether it wants to be a stock teenage comedy or something more, it ends up stranded in the middle of nowhere.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The gay, independent comedy Adam & Steve is as crude and nonsensical as any number of B-list studio equivalents, with the added disadvantages of a low budget and shaky direction by Craig Chester, who wrote and also stars.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    In A Family Thing, an earnest upbeat fable about the meaning of brotherhood in America, first-rate film acting infuses a contrived story with enough flesh, blood, wrinkles, warts and beads of sweat to make it intermittently surge to life.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    As Shadows vacillates between the historical and the occult, you may snicker at the way hackneyed horror movie conventions are redeployed for more serious ends. But you won't be bored. The movie is well acted (especially by Ms. Stanojevska) and very sexy.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Too elliptical and poetically structured to cohere as more than an intense mood piece with social ramifications. The movie is so enraptured with its own romantic desolation that its narrative drive becomes sidetracked.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    A fascinating double-edged portrait of 1950s Los Angeles.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    As in all her screen performances, Ms. Blanchett immerses herself completely in her character, a damaged, high-strung woman determined to live the straight life while surrounded by temptation.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Has a lavish ceremonial gloss. It is also a very erotic movie.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    It all feels utterly real and banal. You could describe The Trouble With Men and Women as a comfortable armchair to come back to: too comfortable.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    In this sweet, funny wisp of a movie, Mr. Allen shucks off his fabled angst and returns in spirit to those wide-eyed days of yesteryear, before Chekhov, Kafka and Ingmar Bergman invaded his creative imagination.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    The suds that cascade through Tyler Perry’s The Family That Preys more than equal the cubic footage from nighttime soaps like "Dallas," "Dynasty" and their offspring.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    It works just fine as a sophisticated wildlife documentary with a submerged narrative. But if you enjoy the challenge of solving difficult mysteries, Hukkle presents a tantalizing case waiting to be cracked.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    A wispy pubescent comedy.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 10 Stephen Holden
    Ludicrous, impenetrable and headache-inducing.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Its rich, wide-angle view of Italian politics and society stays with you. The details may vary from nation to nation in the industrialized West, but the big picture is pretty much the same everywhere.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Like most movies that examine specific ailments, this gawky, occasionally touching film has the feel of a dramatized case history whose purpose is to educate as much as it is to tell a story.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 0 Stephen Holden
    Putrid comic stew.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    This comic jigsaw puzzle is crammed with deliriously funny little bits.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    Even more than Jerry Lewis, Robin Williams or Pee-wee Herman, Mr. Carrey, now 41 (pretty old for an overgrown kid), sustains a maniacal energy that explodes off the screen in blinding electrical zaps. Those jolts don't always feel pleasant.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Although neither Ms. Berry nor Mr. Del Toro can be faulted in their scenery-chewing moments, these star turns make you uncomfortably aware that they are Oscar-conscious auditions for the Big Prize. Their naked ambition subtly contaminates a movie that, despite its fine acting, has the emotional impact of a general anesthetic.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Today few would dispute Trumbo's assessment of that very dark period: "The blacklist was a time of evil, and no one who survived it on either side came through untouched by evil."
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A crude but irresistibly effervescent movie cut from the same sequined cloth as "Fame," Camp couldn't be better timed to ride the coattails of "Chicago" to cult popularity.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    It begins with a montage of devastating black-and-white news clips interwoven with flashes of the flight of a terrified young widow and her two children. After that, the movie softens somewhat, but it never succumbs to sentimentality.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    If “(Untitled)” shrewdly hedges its bets about the value of it all, it is ultimately on the side of experimental music and art and their champions, no matter how eccentric. For that alone this brave little movie deserves an audience.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Written and directed by the husband-wife team of Kieran and Michele Mulroney, Paper Man is so unsure of itself that its symbolic edifice feels like a desperately erected defense system.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Takes such pains to avoid narrative and verbal cliches and anything that could remotely be construed as sentimental or romantic that it feels curiously flat.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A juggling act between high soap opera and low comedy, Maybe Baby manages to keep its pins in the air until very near the end.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Watching it is like a slow injection of a numbing anesthetic. It may send a chill to your heart, but along with it goes a warning signal to your brain not to believe a word of this hooey.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    A small, mildly entertaining documentary.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Veber's giddy social comedy The Closet finds more delicious, chortling fun in the spectacle of obsequious hypocrisy than any movie I've seen in ages.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Somersault, which the Australian Film Institute garlanded with 13 awards, including best film, director, actor and actress (for Ms. Cornish's astonishing performance), is a movie about the looks on people's faces and the disparity between the surface and the roiling chaos beneath.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    It has the loose-jointed feel of a bunch of sketches packed together into a narrative that doesn't gather much momentum. Its conspiratorial eager beavers are so undeveloped that they could hardly even be called types. You don't care for a second what happens to them.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    For all its political button pushing, Machete is too preposterous to qualify as satire. The only viewers it is likely to upset are the same kind of people who once claimed that the purple Tinky Winky in "Teletubbies" promoted a gay agenda.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    As the film veers uncertainly between meticulous historical recapitulation and shameless hokum, it brings enough characters to populate a mini-series. When the historical details become too clogged, the movie shamelessly overcompensates by wallowing in cheap sentimentality.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Holden
    This disjointed, desperately whimsical film is simply not funny: not for a minute.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    With a director, screenwriter and star who have deep roots in the theater, Off the Map is more than anything an actor's film.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The screenplay evokes this psychosexual power struggle with perfect accuracy and finely tuned performances.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A passionate ground-level examination of home childbirth.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    For its courage to address a ticklish subject with warmhearted humor, Breakfast With Scot, adapted from a novel by Michael Downing, deserves a light round of applause.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Couldn't have succeeded had it been cast with movie stars. Its authenticity derives not only from the streets on which it was filmed but also from its able Colombian cast.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    Quickly curdles into a nasty variation of the one-last-score genre.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    The film is so flat that it leaves you wondering if Mr. Kaniuk's book is ultimately untranslatable to the screen.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Holden
    Although the movie takes on many of the characteristics of a conventional thriller, it refuses to go for cheap, vicious shocks, and the adults are seen through the curtain of Michele's trust.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    A skillfully organized account of Mr. Rogowski's life and of the sport's boom period. But despite the earnest testimony of two former girlfriends, the movie maintains a chilly distance from its subject.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Gets lost in a fog of indecision and compromise.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    A mediocre gross-out movie that barely pushes the envelope.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    So soft-hearted it wouldn't hurt a fly.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    The concert scenes find the stage awash in such intense joy, camaraderie and nationalist pride that you become convinced that making music is a key to longevity and spiritual well-being.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    This agreeable, lightweight movie, written and directed by Georgia Lee, turns the malaises of a suburban family into bittersweet farce that teeters between cheeky humor and surface pathos.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    The dialogue may be crisply idiomatic, but there's finally nothing realistic about the speed with which the characters hurtle through their mood swings and power plays.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Holden
    Like "Cruel Intentions," Swimfan is entertaining enough to be considered a guilty pleasure. But to transcend the teenage movie genre both movies would have needed a baby Glenn Close, and both came up short.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Just below the movie’s attitude of pep-rally cheer is a mood that approaches despair. Mr. Gelbspan has probably amassed as much hard evidence of climate change as anyone alive.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    A larger problem is the film's attempt to piece together a hard-boiled crime drama with a soft-boiled soap opera, ultimately giving precedence to the suds and adding a sickly lemon scent.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Blessed by Fire, a bitter remembrance of the Falklands War in 1982, captures battlefield chaos and confusion with a visceral force you won't forget.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Holden
    A bleak, static mood piece about adolescent emptiness. There's little dialogue, and what there is offers the scantest information about Gerardo, who, as played by Mr. Ortuño, conveys an impenetrable blank-faced melancholy.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    Small, smart, off-kilter comedy.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Holden
    Escape From L.A., which the director wrote with Mr. Russell and Debra Hill, is much too giddy to make sense as a politically astute pop fable. As amusing as some of its notions may be, none are developed into sustained running jokes. [09 Aug 1996, p.C5]
    • The New York Times
    • 44 Metascore
    • 10 Stephen Holden
    More than sad, it's slightly sickening to consider the technology, talent and know-how squandered on Hostage, a pile of blood-soaked toxic waste dumped onto the screen in an attempt to salvage Bruce Willis's fading career as an action hero.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Holden
    So good it leaves you starved for more.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    What gives the film a chilly authenticity is the creepy performance of Arno Frisch in the title role. Cool and unsmiling, with a dark inscrutable gaze, his Benny is the apotheosis of what the author George W. S. Trow has called the cold child, or an unfeeling young person whose detachment and short attention span have been molded by television.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Holden
    The exquisitely coordinated performances elicit an empathy as powerful as anything I can remember feeling in a recent film.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Holden
    An ensemble piece developed from an improvisational workshop, the movie exudes a haunted melancholy that recalls such early Alan Rudolph films as "Choose Me" and "Welcome to L.A," and it includes several flashy performances.

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