For 1,960 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 73% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 25% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Steven Rea's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Chop Shop
Lowest review score: 0 A Little Bit of Heaven
Score distribution:
1960 movie reviews
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    For its amusing premise, Fanboys is scarily flat.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    No one is bad in The Big Wedding, but no one is remotely believable, either.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Dull plod.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    It is a good hour too long, although it does boast Christopher Walken.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A moody cyber-noir with not much on its mind but looking good, Blackhat is a must-see if you like your dialogue (romantic, dramatic, subtitled Cantonese) peppered with techspeak.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Less a Holocaust retribution fantasy than a messy homage to war movies, and to movies, period.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Manages to rocket along at full speed. At the same time, however, the movie feels as if it's not going anywhere at all.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    What Hannibal Rising is, mostly, is a hoot.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The real Radio, and the real coach -- seen together in the movie's feel-good epilogue -- deserve better.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Murky and grainy, and showing human beings at their grimmest - thievery, rape, betrayal, murder - Blindness is no barrel of laughs. But it IS a barrel of pretentious metaphorical musings.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Stephen King without the snap, David Lynch without the kink, teen horror without the teen hormones, Darkness Falls falls apart in a crescendo of creepy-crawly hoo-ha. It's more like Darkness Kerplunks.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Isn't as jaw-droppingly awful as its trailers suggest.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A thuddingly dull remake of the 1971 crime drama starring Michael Caine.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    There are tiny glints of humor and intelligence at work, and the action and animation rockets along slickly and stylishly. But unlike the protagonists of almost any and all of the Pixar titles, Astro Boy's namesake lacks even an iota of soul.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Epic piffle.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    There's nothing hip or ironic about Poseidon, which makes Russell and Lucas the perfect leading men.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    It's still a submarine movie, confined by the ship, the sea, and a convention-laden script.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    DePalma's movie offers its own doctoring and processing, without delivering an ounce of real humanity - good or bad - in the bargain.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A sloppy, sentimental story line and pivotal plot turns that are only sketchily realized undermine the life-on-the-road misadventures.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Feels like the cinematic equivalent of the BP disaster in the gulf: It's a big-screen oil spill, a needless gushing of macho bluster and wild set pieces, and a waste of millions and millions of dollars.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    At least an hour of Man of Steel's excessive running time is devoted to the sort of crash-and-burn, slamming-into-skyscrapers CG fight scenes that we've already seen in "The Avengers" and "Dark Knight," "Iron Man," and "Spider-Man." Man of Steel is just the same old same old.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Secret in Their Eyes is notable for its top-tier cast - Julia Roberts, Nicole Kidman, and Chiwetel Ejiofor are the leads - and for its utter lack of credulity and good sense.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Harry Connick Jr. acquits himself best of the lot.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    In truth, the only hazardous material to be found in Diana - the title role assumed bravely, if mistakenly, by Naomi Watts - is the screenplay.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Doesn't take itself seriously, and that's a good thing.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    For all its mayhem, for all the smashing windows and kabooming fireballs, the grenade launchers and giant helicopters, A Good Day to Die Hard not only fails to top its predecessors, it also forgets the basic Die Hard rules.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    This is not about a reluctant hero drawing courage from some deep personal well. It's not about dread and danger. It's about visual effects.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    City Slickers I managed to poke fun at the whole Iron John/discover-your- maleness movement at the same time the film was able to embrace it. But while City Slickers II tries for the same mix, it doesn't work. Instead, we get shots of three smelly, unshaven guys getting blubbery and hugging each other. [10 June 1994, p.03]
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The Island could be read as a metaphor for societal ills (commercialization, conformity, pharmaceutical overkill) if it weren't so shamelessly dumb. And dumb it is.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Filled with close-ups of Jesus and his apostles (all the better to hide the absence of elaborate period sets), mixing quotes from the Scripture with flat exposition, this low-budget affair is earnest and, alas, more than a little bit cartoonish.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Directed by Terrence Malick's editor and protégé, A.J. Edwards, The Better Angels abounds with Malick-ian moments: upward-pointing cameras capturing bodies wheeling through fields, plaintive voice-overs punctuated by Jew's harp and birdsong, a tendency to drift toward the sky and its moody tableau of clouds.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Aspires to the devilish crudity and unfettered social commentary of South Park. But Zwigoff's direction lacks the exaggerated cartoonishness necessary.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Thank goodness for Leslie Mann. If not for the nutball charm of this tight-wound whirlwind, the dispiriting Hollywood sex comedy The Other Woman would be close to unbearable.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Decidedly loopy and nonlinear, Mister Lonely is precious and artsy, but there are moments when Korine's, er, unique vision brings something bold and beautiful to the table.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The trouble with Alfie - apart from the film's existence, and the wrongheaded idea of remaking a minor classic - is that not a soul is likable.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Feels thoroughly canned.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The script appears to have been designed, created and produced entirely in 1-D: a mishmash of kidcentric antics, follow-your-dream cliches, and innocuously icky humor.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Has a low-key tone that works in its favor for a time.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    It works here and there. And then it doesn't.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    You'd think a movie about transplanting human consciousness would be smarter than this.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Shot in Panama, with a cast of local Indians and B-tier Latino and Anglo actors, End of the Spear has neither the marquee heft nor the artistic gravitas of "The New World."
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Chicken Little is entirely lacking in anything "Disneyesque."
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Shortbus suffers from a vague, ad lib-y script and a cast that, while hardly shy, isn't exactly charismatic.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The trouble with The Last Kiss comes down to Paul Haggis' screenplay.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    An alarmingly charmless attempt to evoke the elegant romance and jaunty, jet-setting intrigue of the aforementioned titles, The Tourist is notable for the total absence of movie-star heat that movie stars are paid unseemly sums to radiate.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Until Seven Days in Utopia sucker punches you with a surfeit of faith-based platitudes, its upbeat brand of golf mysticism isn't altogether unappealing.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The film never gives you a real sense of what drove Darin on, fighting a heart ailment (from childhood rheumatic fever) and fighting an industry and press that wanted to pigeonhole him.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The folks at Disney's Touchstone Pictures would have been wiser, however, just to have forgotten all about this hyperactive farce.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    From its jungle forays to its waterfall tumbles to its deadly spider bites - is entirely, utterly unoriginal.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A handsome Holocaust melodrama hobbled by a transparent and cartoonish script.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A strange mix of showbiz whodunit and soft-core eroticism, with a couple of fine actors - Kevin Bacon and Colin Firth - wandering around stunned and stoned-looking, as if someone slipped them a mickey.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Seyfried holds the camera's attention, playing this storybook business pretty much straight, although David Leslie Johnson's script puts the actress sorely to the test.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A dark, shaky, standard-issue superhero picture.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Does the world really need another movie about a married guy wandering blindly into an affair, or the married gal who can't decide whether to remain faithful or fool around?
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Knowing has about a half-dozen screenwriter credits, which may explain why scenes crash up against one another - smart, stupid, far-fetched, compelling. And the trouble is that Cage walks (or runs) through them all, treating each with the same level of intensely goofy seriousness.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A mildly scary, totally meaningless excursion into the realms of psychological horror and alien-abduction conspiracies.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    If Manglehorn is to be remembered at all, it shall be for the excruciating first date that its title character goes on with a chirpy bank clerk he has long been chatting up. Her name is Dawn, and she is played by Holly Hunter.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Where Mike Figgis' film, with Nicolas Cage and Elisabeth Shue, bore deeply and darkly into emotional territory, The Center of the World turns out to be just as fake as its setting.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    In Time is that kind of movie: Philip K. Dick for knuckleheads.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The big shift between Carpenter's B-movie and filmmaker Jean-François Richet's comic book-style remake is that instead of a troop of bloodthirsty gang members encircling the precinct, the bad guys here all look like good guys.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    High-Rise feels like a throwback to a time when this kind of social commentary, in literature and film, seemed shocking and true. Not sure whether it's progress to say that in 2016, High-Rise doesn't shock at all.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Alas, Brick, from writer-director Rian Johnson, isn't as clever as its conceit.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Eva Longoria brings a crisp swagger and fluent Spanish to her role.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The problem with NATM:BOTS is that Stiller, Adams, and company seem to be pretending that they're having fun, too.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Am I crazy, or are Spring Breakers and "Oz the Great and Powerful" essentially the same movie? James Franco stars in both - a tattooed, gun-totin' gangsta in one, a charlatan magician in the other (you figure out which is which), and, in both, he's encircled by a bevy of Hollywood babes determined either to get witchy on him, or get that other witchy-rhyming word on him.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Almost certainly, The Last Stand will not be Schwarzenegger's last. For better or for worse (and this is somewhere right in the middle), he is back.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The film feels long, the editing is choppy, and the plot strands are at once convoluted and cliched.
    • 14 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Much of the dialogue is the silliest sort of fantasy mush, and a good deal of the picture appears to have been shot while the lighting guys were out to lunch.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Never mind the facts. True Story, slick and shaky, doesn't know where the truth lies.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Hemsworth, who is Gale Hawthorne in "The Hunger Games" and the brother of the Hemsworth who stars as "Thor", has maybe one arrow in his acting quiver - he can look engaged.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Intermittent moments of mild amusement ensue.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Flat and predictable.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Eisenberg (who starred in director Fleischer's far better Zombieland) does his usual Eisenbergian thing, more slacker and less hacker, but still hitting the same notes. And Ansari squawks and yelps, like a parrot with a grudge.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    An elaborately worked-over opus that's as tarted-up and artificial as Scorsese's '70s classic Mean Streets was gritty and real, Gangs of New York feels like a movie musical without the songs.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A knuckleheaded period piece.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Shaquille O'Neal and Dr. Phil open Scary Movie 4 with an achingly unfunny couple of minutes of severed limbs and errant hoop shots.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    It'd be nice if Jason Statham and Ben Foster, The Mechanic's mentor/protege duo, could crack a smile. Once.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Bobby has its heart in the right place (on its sleeve). But it doesn't have its screenplay anywhere - or at least, anywhere near the heft that its subject demands.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Sandler, shambling and smirky, delivers another of those one-take performances of his - likable and lazy, forever on the verge of cracking himself up.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Let sleeping bros lie.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The closest FF:ROTSS gets to wit is when Johnny convinces a reluctant Reed to attend a bachelor party, after promising the uptight groom-to-be that there won't be any "exotic dancers."
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    It's a sorry spectacle, watching garden gnomes being robbed of their dignity.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Obama, it is implied, is deliberately making America more vulnerable to attack from Muslim extremists. No mention is made of the fact that it was under Obama's watch that Osama bin Laden was killed.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    If that sounds a lot like Rushmore, it is, except that the heart has been sucked out of the thing -- replaced by glib chatter, gratuitous Baudelaire references, and distracting product placement.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    300
    300 is "Gladiator" for the gamer set.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Despite some jaunty performances and its pretty Cotswolds locale, the film, in the end, is hardly a pleasure at all.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Lakeview Terrace's pretense at exploring racial intolerance has been exposed for what it really is: a B-movie copout.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Full of forced jocularity and drawing-room hissy fits, with its cast parading around in vintage threads and antique cars, Easy Virtue is a close-to-insufferable souffle based on the 1925 Noel Coward play.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    If Taking Lives starts off with a modicum of wit and creepy-crawly scares, it winds up somewhere else altogether: in the cliche-strewn land of preposterous red herrings.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Catastrophically overdone.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Feels downright ancient.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Boy, can Harvey Keitel be bad -- and not bad like "Bad Lieutenant," bad like bad acting.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Elegiac and corny and not really convincing on any level (especially when it comes to its treatment of women - be they hookers, or waitresses, or girls on the town), Stand Up Guys nonetheless holds some fascination just for the off-the-charts affectedness of Pacino's performance.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Fails to provide one essential ingredient: suspense.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    It's a big stuffed turkey of a movie, just in time for the holidays.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Satire should be knife-sharp and whip-smart, and The Nanny Diaries never is.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Gimmicky artifice.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    In Don McKellar's remake of "Seducing Doctor Lewis", a 2003 French-Canadian comedy, the charm feels force-fed.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Hesher has its genuinely affecting scenes, but too much of the time it feels false and shallow.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Joltingly graphic and atmospheric (Nixey and his crew at least know how to set up a few good shocks), Don't Be Afraid of the Dark fails to involve us in any meaningful way with its characters.

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