For 1,710 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 73% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 25% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Steven Rea's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 Hidden
Lowest review score: 0 Isn't She Great
Score distribution:
1,710 movie reviews
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The screenplay of Open Range, credited to one Craig Storper, is an awesome compendium of cowboy-movie cliches. It borders on parody, and often crosses the border, rustling up a drove of oater aphorisms.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Rourke and Roberts! Dueling kings of B-movie excess and cable-TV schlock, together again on the big screen! Talk about chemistry!
    • 22 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Yes, it's stupid. But sometimes it's stupid with a capital S, and it's in those moments of transcendent idiocy that you can't help liking Saving Silverman. At least, a little bit.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The best reason to see Along Came Polly is the supporting cast.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Heartfelt and artfully shot, the movie - with little Rodrigo Noya, wearing big eyeglasses, in the title role - is too sweet for its own good, even as some of its characters do things that aren't terribly sweet at all.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The beautiful Wright Penn has a harder time anchoring the free-spirited Clare in territory that feels honest and true - there's a stagey quality to the actress' performance that goes beyond the stagey quality of her character.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    While it flirts with "After School Special"-ness, at least has the courage to address racial and cultural cliches with a degree of honesty.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Yes, there's a hastily added new ending - an ending that doesn't make sense when you think about it. Not that it's worth the effort
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Christopher Walken has the best moments in the whole thing, portraying the wacked-out auteur of the Gwen-and-Eddie vehicle. Sadly, he's only in America's Sweethearts a few hilarious minutes.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A bit of a one-joke wonder.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's not just Hollywood convention that gets in the way of the story, it's the lack of depth, heft and heart at its core.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Its grossness knows no bounds, and you'd have to be dead not to laugh.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Despite some fine, nuanced acting (it's Lane's movie, to be sure), Unfaithful doesn't get much deeper than a romance novel.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Classy but ultimately unsatisfying film.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An entertaining history lesson. That is, a history lesson that synopsizes and simplifies a complex life and complicated times into easily digestible panels of action, intrigue, martyrdom and sticking it to the papacy.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Your body's sitting there in the theater, but it feels as if your head is someplace else.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Girl With a Pearl Earring is really about watching paint dry. S l o w l y.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Whether he's smacking into an iceberg or flopping topless onto a sandy beach, DiCaprio is still maddeningly lightweight.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Gyllenhaal, in the pivotal role, brings a scruffy, boyish charm to the proceedings, but his big scenes with Hoffman and Sarandon are one-sided - he's not in the same league, and comes off as a bit of a cipher.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A likable, low-budget high school comedy.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 30 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    This is an A-list cast toiling on a C-list screenplay.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's a hokey piece of melodrama in a movie that cheats its characters - and its audience - out of some emotional truth.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Starts having the same effect as one too many tequilas: the Hong Kong-style stunts, the goofy wisecracks, the foxy presence of Eva Mendes -- all of it becomes blurry and numbing.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Beautiful to behold but lacking in any kind of palpable dread or suspense.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A downer of a drama.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A handsome-looking movie that's full of the muted greens, browns and grays of the tony Hamptons, director Williams' tale never quite finds its footing.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Visually dazzling but ultimately dizzying ride, a trippy suspenser that gets tripped up on its own deja vu voodoo.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Too bad Chocolat isn't as seductive as its leading lady.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Very slight and, in the early going, slightly annoying, Coffee and Cigarettes is a long-borning Jarmusch project.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Never mind the cool, convincing effects (and they are cool), The Day After Tomorrow teems with illogical action, improbable coincidences. It's pure escapist fare, a popcorn gobbler.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Plot contrivances, including an ominous cowboy-hatted figure who stalks Bitsey and her tagalong intern (Gabriel Mann), undermine the story's serious political themes.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Visually, taking its cues (mostly) from Van Allsburg's Hopperesque art, The Polar Express is eye-popping. Storywise, however, it can be eyelid-drooping.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Ray
    It's a shame about Ray, because Foxx is trapped in a movie that takes the music icon's unique story and turns it into cheesy, sentimental American Dream cliches.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    As for Duff, she's bright-eyed and bubbly, though her singing talents are nowhere near as awesome as Raise Your Voice's who's-going-to-win-the-big-scholarship plotline requires.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A tale of disaffection, devastation and epiphanies of the catastrophic kind.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    But moving across this tableau is Frodo and his gang, and here the trouble lies...Not a one seems believable as conveyed by Wood, who forever looks to be on the brink of a good sob. Likewise, his hobbit sidekick Samwise Gamgee (Sean Astin) is a real wuss.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Salt offers a sloppy concoction of story elements from '70s espionage classics - the sinister black ops of "Three Days of the Condor," the nuclear dread of "Fail-Safe," the political-assassination scenarios of "The Day of the Jackal."
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The Twilight star's line-readings have become like Edward and his bloodsucking kin: They lack a pulse.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It lacks the resonances of Gilbert's book.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Stymied by a clunking script, crammed with expository exchanges and urgent blather.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Mediogre at best.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Forte and company have managed to make crude and lewd dunderheadedness laugh-out-loud funny here and there, and that, I guess, is something of an achievement.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Doesn't run very deep, or resonate with profound meaning. But as a thoughtful fable, laced with humor, the picture has its charms.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 32 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Some of the most tasteless and un-PC comedy in the film is also the funniest - Farrelly Brothers-style humor that plays off the Bateman character's physical limitations.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's not that Fay Grim isn't amusing. It is, in that deadpan, skewed way that indie auteur Hartley's pics always are. But there's not much else going on here.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Finding Amanda isn't bad, and there is some smart, jagged humor.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There's a lot of rambling and shambling going on in these overlapping stories, often to the point where Explicit Ills no longer feels like it has a point.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Gritty and compelling up to a point, but cheaply exploitive as well.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's a vivid way to contextualize Hypatia's astronomical musings, but it's kind of out there, too.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    This based-on-real-life tale of artistic aspirations and international politics is packed with more corn than an Iowa silo.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    RED
    Too long, too busy, too loud, and too reliant on slam-bang stunt work, Red's glib dialogue and sinister government scenarios begin to wear.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Has an empty, soulless feel.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    If there's a psych ward for motion pictures, It's Kind of a Funny Story should check itself in. Boden and Fleck's film suffers from bipolar disorder: manic and silly one minute, moody and muted the next.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There's a loose, vérité vibe here, and times when both Williams and Gosling root down deep to deliver something resonant and true. But this modern-day kitchen sink drama is ultimately too painful, too labored, to care much about at all.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Scott shoots and edits Unstoppable with roller-coaster momentum and an eye (and ear) on that roaring tonnage of steel.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There's no adroitness, no grace in the handling of the pitching emotions - funny, sad, icky - that such a story presents.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Wild Target is the sort of farce where nothing, essentially, is at stake, even as cars crash (including an original Mini Cooper), bullets rip, and knives get hurled with deadly velocity.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Mostly The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest belongs to Mikael Blomkvist (Michael Nyqvist), the tall and intrepid magazine journalist who is determined to clear Lisbeth's name, and who goes about doing so - and making espresso and checking his e-mail - with zeal.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    When it works - and it doesn't half the time - it's as if Monty Python were back, putting its merrily imbecilic stamp on the dark world of terrorism.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    As Hopkins himself goes wild-eyed and FX-ed with popping veins, The Rite gives up on asking us to take it seriously.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Grisly stuff. The movie, shot in Australia with an Aussie and British cast, makes "127 Hours" look like a walk in the park.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The meaning - and irony - of Kaboom's title doesn't become clear until a beat or two before the end credits roll, and even then it's hard to say what exactly Araki is getting at.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    For genre geeks, this can be fun - although nothing in Scream 4 is quite as clever as the filmmakers seem to think it is.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    If your idea of a fun night out is to be manipulated by freaky sound effects, jumpy edits, and point-of-view shots of ceiling fans whooshing menacingly, Insidious is the film for you.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Frankly, the wow factor isn't that great.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Easily the trippiest and goofiest of the five addled adolescent vampire romances based on the Stephenie Meyer books.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Neither fish nor fowl (nor extraterrestrial), and that's a problem. Craig, handsomely craggy, plays it straight, and like Eastwood's Man With No Name, he doesn't have much to say.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Instead of gleaning something from real life, the great minds behind Friends With Benefits slapped their ideas together based on screwball classics, "Sleepless in Seattle" bits, and a keen analysis of Hollywood hackery.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An elaborate origins story with more datelines than an issue of Condé Nast Traveler (Oxford! Miami! Argentina! Poland!), X-Men: First Class has some fun trying to explain how Professor X, Magneto, and all those mopey mutants came to be.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Don't come to The Amazing-Spider-Man looking for originality.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It also smells very much like a movie with money on its mind - not altogether successfully balancing its loftier ideas with a sense of superficial whimsy and Vegas-meets-Wizard of Oz production design.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A raunchy comedy that's funnier to think about than to watch.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Too cute for its own good, Larry Crowne is nonetheless hard to dislike.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    With the exception of a few stakes and crosses jumping from the screen, some bloody sprays here and there, and one creepy, claustrophobic car ride, the 3-D glasses are a hindrance, not an enhancement.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    As remakes go, Footloose is fine, serving up slightly fresher batches of cheese and corn. But why? Why?
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's hard to feel compassion for these Masters of the Universe. I'm not even sure Chandor wants us to, but if he doesn't, then what's the point?
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Devoting more time to the setup than to the follow-through, Tower Heist doesn't really build suspense so much as it builds impatience - for the thing to be over.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A big, kabooming sequel that plays sleight-of-hand with its audience.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Unfortunately, David Koepp - the A-list Hollywood screenwriter (Jurassic Park, War of the Worlds) and decidedly less-successful director (Ghost Town, Secret Window) - can't find the right Looney Tunes-ish tone for his immersion into bike-messenger culture.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Ready-made for Valentine's Day, The Vow is, like the offerings at Cafe Mnemonic, a total sugar overload.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Lockout is genre all the way. The film wears its colors proudly, but it also, alas, wears out its welcome.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    That's kind of the aesthetic that Stanton is going for: over-the-top pulp. But there's something generic about the digitally rendered Martians, and there's a corniness to the dialogue that keeps the audience from any kind of emotional attachment to the Tharks and Zodangans and their ilk.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The chaos and carnage here is just a pumped-up take on a tradition that harks back to Godzilla, and harks back, of course, to the Marvel comics from which all these heros originally sprang.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A jukebox musical that's astonishingly cornball one minute, winkingly sardonic the next.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It is Rapace, the Swedish actress who gained worldwide recognition as Lisbeth Salander in the original adaptation of "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo," who ends up the true heroine of Prometheus.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Peter Jackson devotees may not like to hear this, but Jack the Giant Slayer is far more accomplished, visually speaking, than The Hobbit: An Unexpected Snooze, I mean, Journey.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Strip away the video-game visual effects, the endless chases and zero gravity shootouts, and Total Recall comes down to this: What is reality?
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Circumstance is more interesting for its cultural views than for its insights into love, sex, family angst, and rebellious youth.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The paper's motto is "All the News That's Fit to Print." But all that news doesn't necessarily fit neatly into a 90-minute doc.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    In some ways, American Reunion is the Charlize Theron indie "Young Adult" all over again: In both, a small-town high school reunion is the setting for a lot of nostalgia and narcissism and nasty behavior.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Not only eight minutes shorter than its forebear, it's at least eight minutes better - less twee, less chatty, more action, more Elvish.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Is Django Unchained about race and power and the ugly side of history? Only as much as "Inglourious Basterds" was about race and power and the ugly side of history. It's a live-action, heads-exploding, shoot-'em-up cartoon. Sometimes it crackles, and sometimes it merely cracks.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    By the end of the film, Leo is beginning to sound suspiciously like HAL in 2001: A Space Odyssey. Robotic, and more than a little peeved.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Most disappointing, Eastwood's decades-spanning portrait reveals little about the man himself.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    One of the problems with The Dark World is that its monsters and angry armies and visual effects are interchangeable with Peter Jackson's Tolkien pics, with Clash of the Titans, with The Avengers, with Man of Steel, and on and on. These superhero movies. These Middle Earth movies. These mythic god movies. It's getting hard to tell them apart.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Fragmented, dreamlike, a whir of memories and misery, We Need to Talk About Kevin is unsettling, but also somehow unnecessary.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There isn't a real, flesh-and-blood figure in the bunch. Everything about Red Tails - the breaking down of racial barriers, the military achievements, the courage and sacrifice - is diminished in the process.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Lacks the origin-story freshness of its predecessor (even if the inaugural Garfield Spider-Man came only five years after the final installment of the Sam Raimi-directed Tobey Maguire Spider-Man trilogy). It lacks a charismatic central character, too.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Taylor Hackford directs crisply, unpretentiously. Patti LuPone goes Latina, playing Lopez's soap opera-addicted mom, and Bobby Cannavale is a Palm Beach cop with an eye for Leslie. The action is fast and furious.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The Grey, whose clipped title, grim swagger, and lost-in-the-outback themes conjure up visions of that Alec Baldwin/Anthony Hopkins classic, "The Edge," devolves into a predictable man-against-nature, and man-against-fellow man, affair.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Efron, who wears an "All glory is fleeting" tattoo on his back and a soulful look on his face, gets to be more of a grown-up in The Lucky One than in most of what he's done before.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    In truth, despite more corn than Mel Gibson grows on his farm in "Signs" (another Shyamalan effort), After Earth is worth a look.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Arnold's Wuthering Heights has its doom-laden moments of urgency and heartache, but vast swaths of the (longish) film just seem to meander across the muddy hills.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Penn's over-the-top tirades and bullying threats are still there - it's a wild and woolly performance that isn't always as menacing as perhaps the actor intended it to be.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Oh so slight and forgettable.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There are big, jaunty gusts of music, and there are big, jaunty gusts of acting: the Heath Ledger-esque Alexander Fehling pumps up his Johann Wolfgang von Goethe with brash, boyish verve and stormy emoting.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There's a great movie out now about magicians, sleight-of-hand maestros, illusionists, card and coin tricksters. Now You See Me is not that movie.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An odd and entertaining mix of backstage melodrama, indie verite, and "Showgirls" kitsch, the usual gender stereotypes are upturned.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There's lots of zero-g action in Ender's Game - even old Han Solo takes a whirl.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The humor and chops are there, but the story isn't quite.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Barnz tries, at least a bit, to acknowledge the heroic and historic legacy of the union movement and its rightful place in the contemporary labor landscape. But much of the blame for the sorry state of Adams Elementary, and the school system at large, is placed at the union's feet.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A likable if not exactly groundbreaking comedy.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Beautiful Creatures tries terribly hard to establish its own mythology of magic and witchcraft and Southern-fried adolescent angst. This isn't Hogwarts, though, and it's not even Forks High from Twilight, but boy, you know Warner Bros., the studio behind Beautiful Creatures, wants it to be!
    • 35 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    In some ways, Identity Thief is a raunchier variation on another recent odd-couple road pic: Barbra Streisand and Seth Rogen as overbearing mom and nebbish son in "The Guilt Trip."
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's fun to watch Keaton and Kline together, bickering and (of course) bonding all over again.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's the classic odd-couple buddy movie setup, only it'll pull at your heartstrings, whether you want it too or not. And you won't want it to, because it's sap.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Meta and messy, Seven Psychopaths does not hang together like "In Bruges."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The problem with Captain America: The Winter Soldier is that there's too much going on: the Marvel Universe stuff, the WikiLeaks-ish paranoia stuff, the video game-ish CG visual effects stuff, the epic John Woo-ish everybody-pointing-a-weapon-at-everybody-else face-off stuff.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Casting herself (as the proprietor of the local cafe) along with a mix of professional and nonprofessional actors, Labaki tries to get across her give-peace-a-chance message with humor, with song, with melodrama.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    At a certain point in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, you expect Caesar to say, "Et tu, Koba?" Maybe a bit obvious, but it would have shown some wit.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The Internship itself would be kind of charming, too, if this Google-recruitment film, this 119-minute commercial for Googliness, weren't so downright creepy.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    With border crossings and familiar buddy-cop movie tropes (think Lethal Weapon, think 48 HRS, think The Heat), the Wahlberg-Washington express hits lots of comfortably familiar notes. And more than a few viciously uncomfortable ones, too.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Little White Lies wants to capture something momentous and meaningful in these people's lives. But ultimately it's hard to care.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Too much of the action in Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit takes place on laptops, thumb drives, and video monitors.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Directed by veteran stuntman Ric Roman Waugh, Snitch is shot with a mix of nervous close-ups and weirdly vertiginous angles.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Admission works in stops and starts.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An innocuously smutty road comedy.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Any semblance of seriousness and verisimilitude suggested by the marketing campaign is quickly forgotten once director Antoine Fuqua's enjoyably tacky Die Hard-on-the-Potomac gets under way.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    More a deification than a documentary.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Jobs is a just-the-facts - and fiddling-with-the-facts - dramatization, forgoing any kind of deeper psychological exploration of the man and his motivations, his demons and dreams.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    McCarthy's screenplay, a tangle of doublecrosses and dead men, has just been published. Those who really want to know what's going on would be advised to buy a copy.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's bleak business, and as it hurries toward its explosive, expository conclusion, the film becomes nonsensical, too.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Despite the charismatic efforts of the British actor Ahmed, The Reluctant Fundamentalist gets bogged down in proselytizing and plot.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Been there, done that. As thrilling a filmmaker as Martin Scorsese continues to be, and as wild a performance as Leonardo DiCaprio dishes up as its morally bankrupt master of the universe, The Wolf of Wall Street seems almost entirely unnecessary.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Echoing the lessons learned from "HAL in 2001: A Space Odyssey," the message of Transcendence is that computers should not be allowed to become sentient.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Disconnect is an Eleanor Rigby movie. Look at all the lonely people. A "Crash" for the Internet age, Alex Henry Rubin's topical opus swoops down like an alien spaceship to investigate a disparate group of Earthlings living in close proximity in the suburbs of New York City.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    August: Osage County is the movie equivalent of Denny's Lumberjack Slam breakfast. If eggs, bacon, and toast aren't enough, throw in some ham, some sausage, pancakes, and hash browns. And then throw in more ham.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Black Nativity offers a whopping serving of Yuletide emotion. And it's a musical - with plenty of wailing and rapping on the side.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An atmospheric Argentine thriller starring Viggo Mortensen in twin roles (literally), Everybody Has a Plan is in the vein of, if not on the same plane as, Michelangelo Antonioni's "The Passenger."
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It is by turns illuminating, exasperating, sloppy, redundant, a head-spinner, and a headache.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    22 Jump Street's scattershot approach to comedy is rooted in the belief that for every anatomical, scatalogical, sexual, or pop-cultural reference and pun gone awry, another will stick to the wall like, um, bodily fluid.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Like Liam Neeson's "Taken" series, Costner's 3 Days to Kill finds its absentee-dad action hero facing off against hordes of goons and gorillas - not to rescue his loved ones, but to prove himself to them, and maybe get a little extra quality time, too.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Luckily, Statham is up to the task. Which is a surprise, because he's never, ever done anything like this before.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The movie devolves into a kind of high-tech Flash Gordon, with Ra as a cross- dressed Ming and Russell and Spader as the heroes required to chase big lugs with ray-guns around the inside of a pyramid. Things get pretty brainless before it's over, although Russell does get to deliver a great send-off line. [28 Oct 1994, p.5]
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Then Death feels the need to intrude again. And again. If his accent weren't so charming, his voice so resonant, it would be depressing, all this meddling and mortality.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Ultimately, it's the romance that feels forced and phony, not the group meetings, the confessions, the anguished moments alone.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There is a lot of finger-pointing. Assertions are made, theories offered, but not much in the way of certainty.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Wood, for her part, can appear sad, or seductive, or mysterious, or happy, or lovestruck, or deeply troubled. Gabi is also very good with a gun, so look out.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    With his sleepy, So-Cal inflections, Costner is an actor who summons urgency and drama with, well, I'm not sure exactly how he does what he does. He's the least dynamic of stars, but still, he is one.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A kind of Tracy/Hepburn rom-com with a "Dead Poets Society" backdrop and dollops of human failing for added drama, Words and Pictures stars Clive Owen and Juliette Binoche - a matchup that makes you want to like Fred Schepisi's film, even when it becomes impossible to do so.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It would be curmudgeonly to count all the ways in which The Hundred-Foot Journey is unsurprising, unrealistic, unnecessary.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Any movie that considers the possibility of an afterlife, or the possibility that there isn't one, without first getting all postapocalyptic about it, merits some respect. Stay, Mia, stay!
    • 23 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Stephen King without the snap, David Lynch without the kink, teen horror without the teen hormones, Darkness Falls falls apart in a crescendo of creepy-crawly hoo-ha. It's more like Darkness Kerplunks.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    With a clamorous soundtrack and a whirl of elaborate chases and busily choreographed fight scenes, this is Sherlock Holmes with Attention Deficit Disorder.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Less a Holocaust retribution fantasy than a messy homage to war movies, and to movies, period.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Ultimately, 44 Inch Chest has very little on its mind.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    An uninspired computer-animated feature that may satisfy undiscriminating pipsqueaks and nearly no one else, Planet 51 is a low-IQ E.T. in reverse.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A syrupy and extraordinarily ridiculous adaptation.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A mildly scary, totally meaningless excursion into the realms of psychological horror and alien-abduction conspiracies.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    There are tiny glints of humor and intelligence at work, and the action and animation rockets along slickly and stylishly. But unlike the protagonists of almost any and all of the Pixar titles, Astro Boy's namesake lacks even an iota of soul.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Knowing has about a half-dozen screenwriter credits, which may explain why scenes crash up against one another - smart, stupid, far-fetched, compelling. And the trouble is that Cage walks (or runs) through them all, treating each with the same level of intensely goofy seriousness.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    300
    300 is "Gladiator" for the gamer set.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Awash in nostalgia and amped-up male camaraderie, Richard Curtis' Pirate Radio takes a great story - the hugely popular offshore radio stations that illegally broadcast pop and rock in 1960s Britain - and turns it into an aggressively irritating floating frat-party romp.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Harry Connick Jr. acquits himself best of the lot.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Has a low-key tone that works in its favor for a time.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    "Kill Bill" without irony, and without Quentin Tarantino's flair for cool dialogue and chop-socky action (and without Uma Thurman, for that matter), Elektra is a pretty-looking, pretty dull adaptation of the Marvel Comic about a dishy, deadly assassin.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The big shift between Carpenter's B-movie and filmmaker Jean-François Richet's comic book-style remake is that instead of a troop of bloodthirsty gang members encircling the precinct, the bad guys here all look like good guys.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The movie's main purpose seems to be to make audiences squirm uncomfortably. Yelp and shriek in armchair-clawing glee? Not likely.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A creaky, cliched, feel-good family drama about learning to stop and smell the roses - and planting a vegetable garden while you're at it - Uncle Nino is shameless, sappy fare.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The film feels long, the editing is choppy, and the plot strands are at once convoluted and cliched.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    For the casual viewer who feels like maybe all the Sith hoopla is worth checking out, well, it's like tuning in to the season finale of "24" without having watched a minute of its lead-up episodes.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The Island could be read as a metaphor for societal ills (commercialization, conformity, pharmaceutical overkill) if it weren't so shamelessly dumb. And dumb it is.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Manages to rocket along at full speed. At the same time, however, the movie feels as if it's not going anywhere at all.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Alternately tedious, cliched and unintentionally funny.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    For high-speed action, eye-popping locales, and chopsocky fight-fests galore, watch The Transporter - on video.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A silly melodrama.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A strange mix of showbiz whodunit and soft-core eroticism, with a couple of fine actors - Kevin Bacon and Colin Firth - wandering around stunned and stoned-looking, as if someone slipped them a mickey.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The Weather Man belongs to a school of earnest, artsy Hollywood flicks that includes the Michael Douglas-goes-bonkers "Falling Down," and a lineage that goes back to revered 1970s pics like "Five Easy Pieces."
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Chicken Little is entirely lacking in anything "Disneyesque."
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Owen is all right as the harried husband whose relationship at home has turned frosty, but the essential heat between him and Aniston is missing. The actress succeeds in shedding her "Friends" persona, but there's something missing here, especially as things get knottier.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A lush, lovely snooze-fest.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Jeremy Irons slithers on board with a haughty sneer and papal vestments, playing Bishop Pucci.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Shot in Panama, with a cast of local Indians and B-tier Latino and Anglo actors, End of the Spear has neither the marquee heft nor the artistic gravitas of "The New World."
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    For a while, Firewall whips up the accordant dollops of suspense and dread, but it's not long before the timely issue of identity theft takes a backseat to old-fashioned Hollywood villainy, unnecessary (and nonsensical) red herrings, and STUFF THAT DOESN'T MAKE SENSE.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Alas, Brick, from writer-director Rian Johnson, isn't as clever as its conceit.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Shaquille O'Neal and Dr. Phil open Scary Movie 4 with an achingly unfunny couple of minutes of severed limbs and errant hoop shots.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Eva Longoria brings a crisp swagger and fluent Spanish to her role.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    McKellen, Hanks and Tautou - and Alfred Molina, as a bishop with an agenda - are no slouches when it comes to emoting, but screenwriter Goldsman's rigorously faithful interpretation of Brown's flatfooted prose stylings is the filmic equivalent of putting big chewy baguettes in the actors' maws.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    There's nothing hip or ironic about Poseidon, which makes Russell and Lucas the perfect leading men.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Over the Hedge isn't by any stretch bad. It's just banal.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    And did I mention that it's long? It's long.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A long, tedious and convoluted follow-up to 2003's rollicking high-seas hit, The Curse of the Black Pearl, this second installment in the promised trilogy lacks the swash and buckle of the original. And then some.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Lady in the Water boasts an eclectic cast - almost entirely squandered.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A merrily macabre things-we-do-for-love yarn.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Does the world really need another movie about a married guy wandering blindly into an affair, or the married gal who can't decide whether to remain faithful or fool around?
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The trouble with The Last Kiss comes down to Paul Haggis' screenplay.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    In essence, a wild soap opera disguised as a political allegory, it's a movie, with its over-the-map performances, that is worth catching only for the inadvertent laugh or two.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Shot like a Disney period piece (prettily, with spiffy props, shiny vintage vehicles, and costumes just back from the cleaners), Flyboys introduces its squadron the old-fashioned way: with character-establishing setups.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Shortbus suffers from a vague, ad lib-y script and a cast that, while hardly shy, isn't exactly charismatic.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Alas, something happened on the book-to-screen operating table: Yes, Running With Scissors is rich, twisted, insane, mordant and ridiculous, but it is not funny. Not at all.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Jonathan and Christopher Nolan's adaptation of this novel by Christopher Priest offers three acts of exasperating muddle.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Filled with close-ups of Jesus and his apostles (all the better to hide the absence of elaborate period sets), mixing quotes from the Scripture with flat exposition, this low-budget affair is earnest and, alas, more than a little bit cartoonish.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Bobby has its heart in the right place (on its sleeve). But it doesn't have its screenplay anywhere - or at least, anywhere near the heft that its subject demands.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A noisy, not particularly charming collection of skits and skirmishes.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    What Hannibal Rising is, mostly, is a hoot.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Isn't as jaw-droppingly awful as its trailers suggest.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Premonition is an odd little thing, with a protagonist in a protracted fugue state and a plot that doesn't know whether its coming or going. Or maybe it does.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    If only the screenplay had more going for it than hackneyed homilies and living-in-the-ghetto stereotypes. If only first-time director Sunu Gonera had a surer hand, a knack for something bolder, wilder, goofier.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Vacancy, in the end, simply offers a particularly aggressive brand of couples counseling.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The closest FF:ROTSS gets to wit is when Johnny convinces a reluctant Reed to attend a bachelor party, after promising the uptight groom-to-be that there won't be any "exotic dancers."
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Ultimately, Evan Almighty is too sappy, too sanctimonious.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Satire should be knife-sharp and whip-smart, and The Nanny Diaries never is.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Death Sentence's message - that vengeance is ultimately futile, spinning out a vicious circle of rage and hate - may be commendable, but there's nothing noteworthy about the way Wan, Bacon and their troops go about delivering it.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    What are you going to do when your lead actress offers a performance that's as unlikable as the woman she's portraying? Maybe it's the script (flimsy, formulaic), or filmmaker Alejandro Gomez Monteverde's conspicuous direction, but Tammy Blanchard's Nina, a waitress with a dour disposition and an unwanted pregnancy, pretty much sucks the life out of this well-meaning melodrama.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Dull plod.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Zemeckis, who blazed trails mixing live-action with animation in "Who Framed Roger Rabbit," blazes not even a footpath here.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Dizzyingly incoherent and subversively surreal, this sophomore effort from the man who made the great, strange "Donnie Darko" is certain to have its fans. I'm not going to be one of them.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    DePalma's movie offers its own doctoring and processing, without delivering an ounce of real humanity - good or bad - in the bargain.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    There's not a believable character, nor line of convincing dialogue to be found.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Intermittent moments of mild amusement ensue.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Moderately scary, moderately amusing, intermittently dull and obvious, Diary of the Dead is not groundbreaking, nor even ground-quaking.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A bummer.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The playwright, actor, director and drag queen (yes, his bewigged and be wild Madea makes a brief and totally gratuitous appearance in his new film) knows how to give human dimension, and a dimension of humor, to the cliches and stereotypes.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Decidedly loopy and nonlinear, Mister Lonely is precious and artsy, but there are moments when Korine's, er, unique vision brings something bold and beautiful to the table.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Piles dumb gag upon dumb gag - it's like benign pummeling. Occasionally, you just have to laugh.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Anderson, who's turned Brit in a number of TV series and films, including "Bleak House" and "The Last King of Scotland," is compelling in her white lab coat and surgical scrubs, and she brings some real tenderness to her tete-a-tetes with Mulder.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Epic piffle.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The movie bogs down in tiresome good guys vs. bad guys action cliches.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A great story - and a true one, more or less - Bottle Shock nonetheless fails to deliver much in the way of entertainment.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The script appears to have been designed, created and produced entirely in 1-D: a mishmash of kidcentric antics, follow-your-dream cliches, and innocuously icky humor.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Full of clunky humor, battle-of-the-sexes musings and spicy accordion music, Everybody Wants to Be Italian is relentless - but not necessarily relentless fun.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Lakeview Terrace's pretense at exploring racial intolerance has been exposed for what it really is: a B-movie copout.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Feels downright ancient.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Murky and grainy, and showing human beings at their grimmest - thievery, rape, betrayal, murder - Blindness is no barrel of laughs. But it IS a barrel of pretentious metaphorical musings.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    If only RocknRolla's characters were at all believable - even in the context of its own cartoon universe.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Gritty, jumpy and rife with cliches.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Although its low-key realism is admirable, Eden doesn't really work: the long silences, the aching stares, the telling props, Breda's quivering blues, Billy's drunkenness, his distraction. There might as well be a sign stuck to the Farrells' front door: Dysfunctional family lives here.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Level of humor: subteen.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    For its amusing premise, Fanboys is scarily flat.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    There's little of the seen-it-all, wise-guy acerbity that made his character in the X-Men trilogy stand apart from his fellow mutants. Here, he just glowers.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Not exactly a hundred million dollars' worth of classic comedy.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Full of forced jocularity and drawing-room hissy fits, with its cast parading around in vintage threads and antique cars, Easy Virtue is a close-to-insufferable souffle based on the 1925 Noel Coward play.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The problem with NATM:BOTS is that Stiller, Adams, and company seem to be pretending that they're having fun, too.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Just about the only folks likely to find this humdrum hybrid of "Mission: Impossible" and "The Wind in the Willows" worthy for consideration are non-discriminating pip-squeaks.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Although Will Ferrell materializes for a goofball cameo, The Goods: Live Hard, Sell Hard lacks a key element that his "Talladega Nights" and "Anchor Man" both had - that is, somebody to like.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The film veers between cutting parody and cliche, threatening to become interesting at any moment, but never quite doing so.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Around the Bend doesn't inspire one to care.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Not even Halle Berry, emerging from the blue Caribbean in an orange two-piece -- can bring this thing to life.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Shows glimmers of great drama, but jettisons too much essential cargo (character development, relationships, plot, common sense) in an effort to be lean and clean.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    It's old, old hat.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Cold and stylish, slick and violent.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 22 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Has its compelling moments, and its playfully inventive ones, too.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A squirmy mix of therapy-session slogans, pop psychobabble, and lots of crying, yelling and pouting on the part of its two stars, who appear in various alarming hairpieces.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    It's nothing if not predictable.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    It has its moments of swaggering camaraderie, but more often just feels generic, derivative and done to death.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Despite some jaunty performances and its pretty Cotswolds locale, the film, in the end, is hardly a pleasure at all.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Fuzzy, feel-good movie about baseball, babes and believing in yourself.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    It's still a submarine movie, confined by the ship, the sea, and a convention-laden script.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Travolta, a bit portly (or is it starboardly?), phones in his performance from his place in Maine; Vaughn is ice-cool but not especially convincing; the kid is OK, and Polo is a blank.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Too cute by half (or maybe three-quarters).
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Yes, bestiality in a PG-13 movie. It's the end of life as we know it.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A knuckleheaded period piece.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The real problem isn't with the actors, it's with 1) the source material, a highfalutin romance novel with a clever literary conceit, and 2) LaBute's clumsy, uncomfortable efforts to telescope Byatt's book into a workable movie.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A tad more character development would have been nice.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Has a dark, low-budget feel and an incongruous combination of self-consciously jokey patter and gross-out gore.
    • 14 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Much of the dialogue is the silliest sort of fantasy mush, and a good deal of the picture appears to have been shot while the lighting guys were out to lunch.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 25 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    At this point in her career, Lopez can clearly bend the universe -- but no amount of bending can make Enough anything more than formulaic.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Has the disjointed feel of a bunch of strung-together TV episodes.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Gimmicky artifice.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Stiff but handsome film, there's little sense of the conflict and complexities that drove Alma Mahler.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The film's intimations of bisexual romance have a certain innate drama that no amount of bad acting or cornball rugby matches can completely erase.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Rock Star sinks into a morass of melodrama.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    xXx
    Less a movie than a collection of pretty cool action set-pieces, linked together with some seriously awful acting and dialogue that even Dr. Evil couldn't deliver with a straight face.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The folks at Disney's Touchstone Pictures would have been wiser, however, just to have forgotten all about this hyperactive farce.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    If that sounds a lot like Rushmore, it is, except that the heart has been sucked out of the thing -- replaced by glib chatter, gratuitous Baudelaire references, and distracting product placement.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Far-fetched and utterly humorless, with a literally tacked-on conclusion (yes, more text on the screen), the only thing that's surprising about Unbreakable is how lame it is.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A collection of double entendres that would make a stevedore blush.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A thuddingly dull remake of the 1971 crime drama starring Michael Caine.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The real Radio, and the real coach -- seen together in the movie's feel-good epilogue -- deserve better.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Catastrophically overdone.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    If Taking Lives starts off with a modicum of wit and creepy-crawly scares, it winds up somewhere else altogether: in the cliche-strewn land of preposterous red herrings.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A by-the-numbers extravanganza that journeys from London to Venice to Siberia to Cambodia without ever really going anywhere.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Feels thoroughly canned.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Doesn't take itself seriously, and that's a good thing.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Despite its penchant for the crude and lewd, is gooey in ways that have nothing to do with bodily fluids.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Where Mike Figgis' film, with Nicolas Cage and Elisabeth Shue, bore deeply and darkly into emotional territory, The Center of the World turns out to be just as fake as its setting.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 26 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    By Twisted's final twist, though, it's all Judd can do to keep a straight face.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    It's simplistic and reactionary and designed to get hearts pumping but not minds thinking.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Fails to provide one essential ingredient: suspense.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Unravels in a series of spooky dream sequences, dopey detective work, and a couple of richly hambone-ian De Niro soliloquies.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    The real problem is that there's nothing to George but the movie's props.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Dumb, dumb, dumb - borrowing scare tactics from Hitchcock and other suspense masters, but forgetting basic story.telling essentials such as character development and logical exposition.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    Utterly charmless - there's not even a glimmer.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    There are, to be sure, some impressive special effects here, and whoever Warner Bros. hires to make the new Superman movie should take notes.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    There's nothing Disneyesque about this bomb except the forced levity of its musical score.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    War is hell, war is cruelty, war is toil and trouble, war is just a shot away. But is war a snooze? Well, by the time Enemy at the Gates has run its course — it sure seems that way.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 23 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A messy fish-out-of-water gangland romp.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    A woefully thin and pointless musical comedy boasting the no-chemistry coupling of Cuba Gooding Jr. and Beyonc?
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    In Jersey Girl, Kevin Smith wears his heart on his sleeve - and on his pants, socks, boxers and backward-facing baseball cap.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Rea
    This glum and grandiose new King Arthur has little to do with the Camelot monarch we've come to know through books and film.