For 1,660 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 72% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 26% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Steven Rea's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Travelers and Magicians
Lowest review score: 0 A Little Bit of Heaven
Score distribution:
1,660 movie reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Boy
    Boy begins with an epigram from E.T.: "You could be happy here . . . . We could grow up together." That's what the film is about - finding happiness, growing up, feeling like a stranger in a strange world.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    An enjoyably clever and cartoonishly gory rom-zom-com.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Wahlberg does what Wahlberg does, bringing muscular conviction to his troubled, tough-guy role. The city may be broken, but the movie star's formula is working fine.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    And talk about transcendent parenting moments: When Lindberg's girls pull out their Barbies, the Pennywise singer goes and gets his Devo doll to play with them.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The filmmaker, whose career took off with a very different sort of Holocaust film, 1990's Oscar-nominated "Europa Europa," understands that most of these stories arrive at a point of unspeakable, incomprehensible horror.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A story of entrepreneurship, of family, of fighting for one's rights - the right to make white lightning, and money. It's as American as apple pie.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Writing with her sister, Karen, Jill Sprecher rigs up an elaborate cause-and-effect comedy of errors, with Kinnear's predatory protagonist as both perp and victim. I won't say more than that, but Thin Ice is deeper than it first appears.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    An economical thriller, both narratively and budgetarily, Sound of My Voice serves up moments of extreme dread and discomfort, but works a winning undercurrent of playful absurdity into the material as well.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Casa de Mi Padre is at its best (a relative term, mind you) when it's at its silliest and most surreal.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    By detailing the allegiance between Tutsi Muslims and Christian Hutus, and the fatwa issued by a Muslim leader forbidding his followers to participate in the massacres, the film is hopeful rather than horrific, even as it describes events of impossible savagery and hate.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Apart from Khodchenkova, who displays the acting acumen of a runway model and gives new meaning to the term Russian mole (she's the villainous vixen of the tale, suited up in high heels and slinky, scaly couture), the cast of The Wolverine is uniformly good.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Marley celebrates the fact that its subject is still among us in the way that perhaps matters most: His music not only survives, it thrives.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's about time: Aubrey Plaza gets her own movie!
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Tautou, who looks even smaller and more fragile alongside her towering leading man, conveys the hurt and hesitancy that are pulling at her character's heart - and does so with seeming effortlessness. It's as though she knows this woman, deep down.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Starlet sneaks up on you. Set in the same sun-dried, strip-malled precincts of the San Fernando Valley where "Boogie Nights" took place - and set, in part, in that same porn industry milieu - Sean Baker's low-key, low-budget indie traces the relationship that develops between a young actress and an isolated, elderly woman.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    RoboCop is a solid near-future action pic that poses moral questions about artificial intelligence and remote-control combat systems without getting too preachy or ponderous about it.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Amazingly, though, Brian Klugman and Lee Sternthal, cowriters and codirectors of The Words, have the audacity - and the skill sets - to pull this all off. They wrest emotional truth out of hokum. They also wrest intelligent, nuanced performances from their cast.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Phoenix's performance is one of such wild, intense abandon that it is not to be believed, and this, in fact, was my problem as The Master sailed into its momentum-less second hour.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    If you're going to take another stab at this tale of a taunted, traumatized teen who exacts fiery revenge on, well, everyone, then Kimberly Peirce is the director to do it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Darren Aronofsky's Noah is the Old Testament on acid. It's the movie equivalent of Christian death metal. It's an antediluvian Lord of the Rings, fist-pumping, ferocious, apocalyptic, and wet - very wet.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    42
    42 doesn't shirk from showing how daunting it was for Robinson to turn the other cheek, as Ford's Rickey tells him he must do, in the face of the insults and hostility.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Out-of-control hilarious.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's an Alzheimer's allegory, full of humanity, heart, and humor.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A Cat in Paris is thrilling, and a thrilling example of traditional ink and paint cartooning.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The momentum Stiller has built up - his character's globe-trotting derring-do, the care and consideration on display in his directing - carries the movie a long way. Falling short of fantastic, The Secret Life of Walter Mitty is still a fantasy to enjoy.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    In the end, Arbitrage disappoints a bit. The writing isn't as sharp, or sophisticated, as it needs be. And the cynicism exhibited by Miller and the circle of traders and tycoons he moves in seeps into the fabric of the story itself.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Deadpan and a bit dopey, Brooklyn Brothers Beat the Best has a shaggy charm, and the chemistry between the tuneful twosome's would-be Sal Paradise and Dean Moriarty makes up for the inevitable rock-and-roll road movie cliches.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Seydoux, no doubt best known for her kickboxing catfight with Paula Patton in "Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol," gives a quiet, watchful performance, suggesting fealty for her lady but also a strong independent streak.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's the cars, and the mega-horsepowered action, that matter most. With its driver-POV spinouts, wrong-way chases, and multilane median jumps, the movie is a roaring revel of an automotive fantasy.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Smart, funny, and gross (often at the same time).
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A beautifully twisted, slow-burning psychothriller that may or may not all be taking place inside India's head.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Killer Joe is twisted pulp, and the actors chew on it bravely, boldly, and with varying degrees of success.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Paperboy is over-the-top every which way you look.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    An effectively spooky ghost story with Guillermo del Toro's imprimatur (he's executive producer), Mama is every adoptive parent's nightmare: What if the children you bring home start eating moths and toilet paper, and won't come out from under the bed? And when they do, it's only to do something hurtful?
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Mostly, Not Fade Away is a hit.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    And that, in the end, is what Quartet is about: determined engagement, embracing music and theater and the arts, and embracing the friends and loved ones you have around you.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The To Do List is sex-obsessed, to be sure, but it's a chick flick, too. And in what it says about women (or girls) and men (or boys) and what they want, maybe it's a movie for us all.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A parablelike melodrama with obvious symbolic meaning.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Jessica Biel is Vera Miles, the star who had the nerve to get pregnant when Hitchcock wanted her for "Vertigo." He feels betrayed, and she feels relieved, consigned to a supporting role in Psycho as Marion's sister. And Toni Collette, in glasses and a dark wig, is Hitchcock's long-suffering secretary, Peggy. Both Biel and Collette are very good, engaging.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Saving Mr. Banks, set in 1961, is smart, delightful.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Delivery Man, with its democratic band of half-siblings and its feel-good view of humankind, is what it is: a reproductive remake that will make you laugh. More than once or twice.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Director John Crowley trots his crew around London, working up a suitable amount of suspense. And paranoia.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The pair are scrappy and smart and riff off each other like a no-budget, indie version of Tracy and Hepburn. It's impossible not to like them, and there's absolutely no reason not to.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    John Dies at the End isn't deep. But it is deeply amusing, in the sickest possible way.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    No manner of bizarre distraction can keep Anchorman's hapless hero from his mission: "I'm going to do what God put Ron Burgundy on this earth to do," he declares. "Have salon-quality hair and read the news!"
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    For all its faults - and there are many, from shameless compression of events to milk the drama for all it's worth, to the gimmicky miscasting of several commanders-in-chief (Robin Williams as Eisenhower is especially egregious) - The Butler is an inspiring and important summation of the black struggle.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The scene when she's (Blanchette) babysitting Ginger's boys and takes them to a diner - and confides about her electric shock treatments ("Edison's medicine"), her breakdowns, about the side effects of Prozac and Lithium . . .. it's genius.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Directed in steady fashion by Redford, The Company You Keep manages to keep its multiple strands of plot - and the people caught in them - from collapsing in a jumble of confusion. This alone, given the whirl of personal and political history going on, is an accomplishment.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Based on reports of a real 2005 incident, it is a film that asks its viewer to consider the nature of good and evil, love and trust - and trust that turns into something like blind faith.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Bling Ring is Sofia Coppola's energetic, elegant, and entertaining take on this real-life story - a comedy, of sorts, if what it says about our obsession with the famous and the frivolous weren't so totally depressing.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Spectacular Now feels genuine in almost every respect, from the unflashy cinematography and the sparingly deployed music cues to the natural, unhurried performances of its two stars. They will get to you, truly.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A conventional biopic made anything but conventional by the magnitude of its subject's life and accomplishments, and by Idris Elba's imposing performance in the title role.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Populaire plays like a musical - you expect anyone, at any time, to break into song.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    An epicurean dream where the dishes conjured up by the characters are as essential to the experience as the characters themselves.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Brosnan is good, and he and Dyrholm erase any and all signs of contrivance in the plot, the script.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Don Jon is about a man's unwitting search for intimacy, for real connection in a world where everyone is connected - by social media, by the Internet, by TV and computer and smartphone screens. That's not exactly an original idea. But Gordon-Levitt goes at it with gusto, and style. Give the guy some props.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Hunt offers a powerful, provocative study of mob mentality and the fabric of trust.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    At a certain point, Bujalski - the mumblecore meister, gleefully pushing the envelope of credulity here - jettisons the mock-doc pretense for a Christopher Guest-like glimpse into a strange subculture of the everyday.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Cooper, who steered Jeff Bridges through his Oscar-winning turn in Crazy Heart, gets fiercely committed performances from just about everyone in Out of the Furnace.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The middle 40 minutes of Lone Survivor have to be some of the toughest battle scenes in Hollywood history - an epic, close-range firefight that finds the SEALs throwing themselves down rock faces like superheroes. Only they aren't superheroes - they bleed, they break.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Kill Your Darlings is a tale of inspiration, then, but also a tale of jealousy, obsession, homophobia, and homicide. It's a whirlwind. Even if it doesn't all hang together, it's worth the ride.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Jones (Like Crazy) gives Nelly's tragic plight a palpable anguish. There is no doubt that Dickens - who was mad about theater, about acting, about inhabiting other lives onstage and in the pages of his books - was in love with Nelly.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Joe
    This world feels studied in its "authenticity": the rusted GMC pickup, the tumbledown shack, the boozy brothel, and angry Joe Ransom guttin' deer and tending to his own gunshot wounds with a grimace and a bottle of alcohol.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Let the Fire Burn does not glorify MOVE. What it does do is force us to consider why and how this surreal event - a city bombing its own citizens, leaving innocent children dead - occurred. And ask, could something like it ever happen again?
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Bakri, a newcomer to acting, has presence and power. His intensity and determination become Omar's.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Strange and gloomy.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Unlike "Caché" and "Code: Unknown," where Haneke's investigations into societal and spiritual despair resonated with poetic force, The White Ribbon doesn't resonate at all.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A Single Man is like a big coffee table book on grief, loneliness, and loss - and mid-20th-century home design.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There is a lot of shield-your-eyes ickiness in District 9, a lot of violence and gore. What there is not a lot of, however, is humanity - even in the film's depiction of the inhumanity humans are capable of.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    For all the film's gritty verisimilitude, The Messenger is not the great Iraq War movie that Kathryn Bigelow's "The Hurt Locker" is.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    That the film, directed in swift strokes by F. Gary Gray from a screenplay credited to Kurt Wimmer, doesn't really work - unrelentingly grim, unintentionally funny - is almost beside the point. It's a wild concept.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Ultimately, the movie's a bust.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A mix of coolheaded cultural satire and anxiety-inducing workplace and marital shenanigans, Extract is an odd project. It's smarter than most of the comedies out there right now, but that doesn't necessarily make it funnier.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A dark-and-stormy sci-fi shoot-'em-up directed by McG, T4 has enough hardware and havoc to satisfy the crowd of action junkies and gamers who sped to "X-Men Origins: Wolverine" on opening weekend. (Terminator Salvation is a couple of liquid metal drops' more satisfying, but only a couple.)
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's earnest, but it feels beside the point. Blood Diamond's real point: box office.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Duplicity zips from one elaborate piece of hugger-mugger to the next. But at a certain point (for me, it was Rome), boredom sets in.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Diaz gets her own voice-over monologue, as does Patric - the different points of view functioning like stanza refrains, born in shared familial anguish.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's not dull, exactly, but neither is it much fun.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Moderately compelling and clinical. This isn't "Breakfast at Tiffany's"; this isn't even "Klute."
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Like "Mr. Holland's Opus," only in French, with an all-boy cast in white shirts and short pants, The Chorus is the kind of sugary, crowd-pleasing fare that only the most curmudgeonly moviegoer can frown upon.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A loving, dopey documentary about the bird man of a place with a view of Alcatraz.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Flipping his cigarette lighter and snapping deadpan retorts, Reeves plays the demon-hunting detective with Keanu-esque panache.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Has the arc of a Shakespearean tragedy, and all the essential components therein: loyalty and betrayal, conspiracy and delusion, self-destruction.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The dialogue rings tinny in the ear, as if enunciated in the phony arc of a stage light.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Where My Wife was offbeat and original, Happily Ever After gets bogged down in midlife-crisis cliches.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Lost in a time warp of its own doing (or non-doing), Hitchhiker's Guide just doesn't seem terribly original.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    For soccer aficionados, Kicking & Screaming boasts some fairly cool play, courtesy of Alessandro Ruggiero and Francesco Liotti, two kids who play "the Italians."
    • 35 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Ma Mere, with its sun-drenched sense of dread and band of reckless, unlikable characters, isn't very good, but that doesn't stop the actors -- especially the intrepid Huppert -- from going all the way.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The film doesn't hold together in any compelling way.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Mr. & Mrs. Smith kicks off with panache and star power - and quickly wears out its welcome.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    5x2
    Cool, clinical and not altogether convincing.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Loses itself in melodrama, caricature and narrative missteps.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Saraband, flat and static both visually and thematically, doesn't begin to approximate the austere beauty of the director's art-house classics.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's the emotional equivalent of a big shrug.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Stylishly spooky and featuring a hammy, cigarette-sucking performance from Gena Rowlands.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    If The Brothers Grimm flies apart like a badly designed airplane (and it does), it still has more going for it than most of the movie fare this summer.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An enjoyably cheesy teen melodrama with a touch of indie edge.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Everything about An Unfinished Life's screenplay is cliched and predictable, but the actors manage to elevate the proceedings above and beyond shameless soap.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A mild and merry romp about family, friends and sexual identity.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A black comedy, a character study, and a thriller, Lord of War lacks the gritty, hell-bent hilarity of David O. Russell's contemporary war pic, "Three Kings."
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's "The Deep" reimagined as an Abercrombie catalog.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It says in the beginning of the film that Two for the Money is "inspired by a true story." Problem is, it's just not that inspired.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's a harrowing tale, but one that gets phonied up with unnecessary slo-mos, manipulative soundtrack cues, and unrestrained thespianism.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's all very deep, but in a tricked-up, art-directed sort of way.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Steeped in attitude - a smart-alecky, insider sarcasm that can be pretty clever at times, but also pretty insufferable.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Illuminated by dim candles and the rare glimmer of sun, the movie is grainy, closed-in, and likely to cause spasms of claustrophobia.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The menagerie of mythological beasties in Narnia don't seem quite genuinely, three-dimensionally real.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Hoodwinked may be a poor cousin to the Shrek franchise, but this made-on-the-cheap computer-animated feature still has more style and snarky gags than Disney's recent CG hit, "Chicken Little."
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An old-style mob movie based on a real court case and a real character - a colorful character - Find Me Guilty is about loyalty, family, and a bunch of good fellas.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    T Bone Burnett's soundtrack has the appropriate twang to give Wenders' Hopperesque tableaux a nice, filmic poetry. But as arresting as the images are, Shepard's clunky, soap-opera banter brings most everything, and everyone, crashing down to earth.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Nunez's dialogue, and the paces he puts this threesome through, just don't ring true. Coastlines is the stuff of pulp, seriously at odds with what the writer-director has always done best. That is, show the inner workings of people, their needs, their fears, their small dreams.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An international caper with James Bond and Tom Clancy overtones - and Austin Powers undertones, too.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Occasionally clicks into full-speed farce mode, but never for long - or for long enough.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    This is the slightest and slimmest of sex comedies.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Take "Honey, I Shrunk the Kids," throw some "Antz" on it, and you have The Ant Bully.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The fundamental problem with The Night Listener is the manner in which the boy, Pete, is depicted. Rory Culkin gets the tricky job of bringing the role to life, and he does it well, but it's still a trick. Or is it?
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A whodunit, a whydunit, and an excuse for Adrien Brody to mug it up like nobody's business.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's not easy being macho while you're shivering like a frozen puppy, but Kutcher pulls it off.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Taken for what it is - 'tweenage escapism - Stormbreaker is moderately fun.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Baked and half-baked, Tenacious D does manage to give the term potty humor a new meaning. That's some kind of genius, right?
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Nasty stuff. It's xenophobic (message: Americans, steer clear of the Third World); it's photogenic (the Sports Illustrated-likeswimsuit issue beach scenes, the colorful villages, the lush landscapes); it's gruesome (operating table POV shots); and it's violent.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Breaking and Entering is smart and smartly done, as it describes these inter-circling worlds - the well-to-do Brits and the newly deposited foreigners, trying to shake off their homeland tragedies and start anew.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    What it lacks, though, is any sense that these people - are real.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There's more voyeurism going on here, and less insight into a certain culture (the young and the wasted), than the filmmakers would probably admit to, but the performances are scarily real, and the outcome, well, is just scary.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Someone should check Joe Carnahan for performance enhancement drugs. Smokin' Aces, the wild ride of a movie he scripted and directed, is so pumped up, manic and mayhem-packed that it practically shoots sweat off the screen.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The Situation deserves credit for not trying to reduce the events in Iraq to facile equations. There is corruption and cynicism on all sides: the U.S. diplomats and military, the Sunni leaders, the thugs in cop uniforms, the local powerbrokers.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Has a breezy, Altmanesque air, as it tracks the mini-dramas of its crisscrossing characters.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    As stories go, The Astronaut Farmer is engaging, even if it serves up a kind of Plains State brand of Rocky-esque hooey.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A roiling, boiling mix of blaxploitation, sexploitation, Tennessee Williams and the Tennessee outback.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    TMNT has a cool, noirish sheen. There's an attention to detail in the visuals and sound design that pushes it up several notches above most kiddie fare. It's not art, dude, but it will do.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Dumb with a capital D, Blades of Glory takes its (almost) fleshed-out sketch-comedy idea as far as an ice-skating buddy movie with we're-not-gay jokes and a psycho stalker can go.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    In a way, The TV Set suffers from the same syndrome as the industry it's parodying: bland and compromised, it feels as if it's been fine-tuned and focus-grouped within an inch of its life.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    This mildly amusing tale of infidelity, blackmail, class differences and corporate greed not only strains credulity - it strains for laughs.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It is possible to bring substance, as well as poetry, to the vignette form, but more often Paris, Je T'Aime is merely mundane.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The Hip Hop Project, a documentary about Kazi and the young men and women he mentors, isn't quite as successful as Kazi himself - a Bahamian orphan and teenage street hustler who turned his life around, and got folks like Queen Latifah, Russell Simmons and Bruce Willis to help out him and his project.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Despite all the stock characters and scenarios, Fox and company manage to bring things to life. And cut some hair.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    What's maddening about Angel-A is that Besson is so brilliant with his visuals - and so in love with his two leads and the city they're parading around - that you desperately want the story, and the characters, to make some kind of emotional sense. This, however, does not happen.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Directed in workmanlike style by Underworld: Evolution's Len Wiseman, has its share of wild stunts and spectacular carnage, but it feels pokey and predictable, too.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Sunshine can be seen as a story about science and religion, about the rational mind and the mad. But at a certain point, like a dying star about to pop into eternal nothingness, the movie can't be seen as anything - it just implodes.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Gretchen Mol stars as a 35-year-old virgin deflowered in lusty romance-novel fashion on a trip to Mexico. Her hunky lover-boy's name? Jesus Christ (played by Justin Theroux). The segment? "Thou shalt not take the Lord's name in vain."
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    With so many good Austen adaptations out there (the Keira Knightley Pride & Prejudice, the Colin Firth Pride and Prejudice, Emma Thompson and Ang Lee's splendid Sense and Sensibility), Becoming Jane seems a bit flimsy by comparison.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Brings too much of EVERYTHING to the table: It's the cinema equivalent of a long, winding, run-on sentence.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Mostly about delivering thrills, and chills, and this it does with moderate success and a bunch of fast, no-nonsense edits.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Even at just 90 minutes, Balls of Fury - with its caricatures of the Asian underworld, with its G-man malarkey and gay jokes (Feng keeps an all-boy bevy of sex slaves) - begins to outstay its welcome.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A bizarre counterculture jukebox musical.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The movie would pour nicely onto a thick stack of pancakes.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Trade comes off like TV-movie sensationalism, sidetracked by distracting backstories and hard-to-swallow plot twists.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    As a meditation on the vicissitudes of love, on the need for people to connect, and the struggles that come by both making and missing those connections, the movie is wading-pool deep.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There's a sign on the way into Norway, or at least a sign that somebody from the film crew put up: "On the eighth day, God created baseball." If amen is your answer to that, then The Final Season is the movie for you.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    By movie's end, it seems like the only one giving a truly genuine performance is Bianca. Mouth-agape, steadfastly mum.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    At times solid and suspenseful, at times dopily implausible and woefully familiar.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The filmmakers' narrative device of framing Quinn's tale as a feature-length flashback doesn't pay off - we get a goody-two-shoes moral lesson at the end, and a look at movie studio aging makeup gone wild.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    I Am Legend is essentially "28 Days Later" . . ., or "28 Weeks Later" . . ., only with millions more for special effects, and with nothing approaching the heart-pounding, bloodcurdling power and smarts of the two British-made yarns.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Emily Watson, looking at home in her '40s frocks, plays Angus' mother - coping not only with her son's obsession with what she believes to be an imaginary friend, but also with her own worry and grief about her husband at war.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Much scampering, yelling, quaking and crying is required of the actors, and they acquit themselves well enough, even with oozing fake wounds and prop rebars piercing their shoulder blades.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    None of these elements quite come together, and while the clothes and props look authentic, the acting doesn't.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There are winning scenes between Wilson and the three teens as they train in various martial arts (like Mexican Judo - "as in Ju-don't know who you're messing with!") and get tips from clips of "Fight Club" and "The Untouchables."
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    How do you say "tearjerker" in Spanish?
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A larky throwback to the breakneck screwballs of Frank Capra and Preston Sturges. Problem is, it isn't breakneck enough.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Despite Scorsese's efforts to pump up some drama - the director, with his signature glasses and Groucho brows, gets huffy about not receiving a set list - drama is sorely lacking. This is just a concert film.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The special effects are effective, though not terribly special. While director Minkoff pays homage to past masters of the genre, the past masters were better at this game than he.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The best thing about The Life Before Her Eyes, a somber meditation on fate and friendship, is the way it captures the close relationship between two teenage girls.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The romanticized image of the tortured artist - never mind how warranted his or her angst might be - is the stuff of stereotype unless it's leavened with humor, or limned in art. In Fugitive Pieces, neither element appears in sufficient quantity.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The film is just middling. A clever line here and there, a debonair Dempsey wink, a cute Monaghan nod, and another Bill and Monica reference to tie things all together.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    One of the problems with the way Mamet resolves Mike's predicament is that it's ridiculously implausible - even in the context of a far-fetched fight story.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Lacking in subtlety and nuance, Broomfield's nerve-jangling movie nonetheless succeeds in showing the war from various vantage points. And from wherever one's standing, the view is profoundly disturbing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    While the production values are top-notch, and the action artfully choreographed, in the end - and quite well before the end - a sense of tedium sets in.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    As scripted by Cathy Rabin and directed by Santosh Sivan, Before the Rains is never less than compelling, but never more than adequately realized.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Don't run off before the credits start to roll, though: The Incredible Hulk ends with a jokey cameo by a certain movie star with his own newfound superhero franchise.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Wanted is head-spinning stuff, and it's easy to get caught up in its masterfully manipulated mayhem. Visually, and viscerally, it's pretty awesome.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Goes somewhere the first "Hellboy" never ventured: into the Realms of Tedium.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The movie's too long - and the violence and mayhem are unexpectedly harsh and heavy - but Franco's inspired, looped performance is right up there in the annals of reefer filmdom with Jeff Bridges' the Dude in "The Big Lebowski."
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The Rocker can be amusingly dopey, with its "Spinal Tap"-ish lampooning of rock idioms - and idiots.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    What Eagle Eye wants to do is show us technology's dark side: all the stuff that's there to make our lives easier - ATMs, PDAs, iPods, GPS, cell phones, PCs, "smart" houses - turned against us in a vast conspiracy.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    While Choke, adapted for the screen and directed by Clark Gregg, is by no means a disaster, it is disappointing - and oddly dull.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Impossibly arty and, at times, narratively incoherent, Filth and Wisdom still has its goofy charms.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An OK sports doc that owes as much to reality TV competitions as it does to the genre of nautical cinema.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A testosterone-fueled road movie that displays the same Apatow-ian obsessions, and raunch, as "Pineapple Express," "Superbad," and "The 40-Year-Old Virgin."
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    All the running, the hiding, the escaping (from giant moles, from giant Murray) are decidedly less exciting, and compelling, than City of Ember wants to be.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A smart aleck-y kidnapping caper that whooshes around to a thumping electronic beat.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The tiny, intrepid rodent is so cute it's impossible not to ooh and aww, just looking at him. Which is a good thing, because you'll need something to get you through the long stretches of fairytale pastiche that make up this overwrought yarn.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Bedtime Stories does have a comic buoyancy, even as its plot trots on a predictable course. Perhaps the different accents and sensibilities have something to do with that.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Sappy, sentimental and redeemed only by the quiet radiance and fidgety intelligence of its leads, Last Chance Harvey is a fantasy about mopey middle-agers getting a second chance at love.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Offers a gripping mix of sexual heat and nasty menace. It's "Dead Calm" meets "Very Bad Things," with English accents.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An enjoyably goofy hybrid of extraterrestrial sci-fi and Iron Age action, Outlander boasts a super-serious Jim Caviezel in the title role
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    With visual nods to Stanley Kubrick's "The Shining" and a fairly faithful adherence to the tenor and tone of the Korean scare genre, The Uninvited doesn't startle and shock so much as it lulls you into a series of unsettling, hallucinogenic set pieces.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Where "Run Lola Run" was like a perpetual-motion machine, The International seems to forever be stopping in its own tracks. Tykwer takes coffee breaks to explain the convoluted and dicey plot.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Like Mickey Rourke in "The Wrestler," Malkovich plays a star long past his glory days in The Great Buck Howard, but continuing to do the only thing he knows. The tone of the two films couldn't be less alike, but the story arc of the central characters graphs the same.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A campy homage to those days of malt shops, drive-ins, and saucer-shaped UFOs - you know, the ones that go crashing into nearby buttes, unleashing terrible terrors from another galaxy.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The Spanish actress Marina Gatell is exotic and engaging as a young writer drawn to Lorca and puzzled why he is not drawn to her in return.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Washington offers another of his rock-steady performances, playing a career civil servant with a couple of secrets of his own, but confident, diligent, ready to go the distance for the city he loves.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    At best diverting, at worst an almost self-parodic compendium of French film cliches.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It can be argued that Adam uses Asperger's as a kind of metaphor for the barriers that people erect to fend off strangers, to guard against intimacy. It can also be argued that writer/director Mayer is shamelessly manipulative.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Teeming with socially awkward misfits, Gentlemen Broncos is not without its absurdist charms, although Hess (who co-scripted with his wife, Jerusha) pushes the envelope in ways it doesn't need pushing.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Olyphant has a cool, amiable vibe, kind of postmodern Jimmy Stewart, while Mitchell brings intelligence and quietude to yet another role that doesn't deserve such consideration.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    In the wake of the Oscar-winning "The Hurt Locker" - a far better film, and one with a less strident, less obvious agenda - Green Zone arrives looking strangely anachronistic.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Charged up with stormy melodrama.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Clash of the Titans is ancient Greece at its cheesiest. It's a big hunk of feta comin' at ya in 3-D.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Invincible works, simply but provocatively, as a parable about the oppressed and the oppressors, victimhood and fanaticism.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    They has a low-budget, generic feel -- but also enough sense to know that unseen menace is a lot creepier than explicit gore.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    This In-Laws feels, in the end, formulaic and unnecessary, especially when the original is yours for the renting at the video store.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Lacks an essential sense of purpose.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The film only occasionally comes to life - it's too literal (and literary), too studied, too still.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Corny and blubbery as it is, still packs an emotional wallop.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    O
    Stripped of its poetry, some of the devices of the tragedy of the Moor come off here as woefully contrived.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Now in his late 40s and hairier than ever, Jeremy seems a simple enough, likable guy, and he has no pretensions about what he does. And no apologies either.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Long and lugubrious.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Laced with a venomous wit, and turning progressively creepier as it unfolds, writer-director Jon Reiss' movie offers a black-humored study of suppressed rage, sexual gamesmanship, domination and subordination.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Empire, with its double-barreled shoot-outs, its predictable carnage and conflict, and a rush-job of a resolution, is ultimately just one more urban gangland genre flick.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    One moment it's farcical comedy, the next it's gruesome melodrama. The movie never finds the right tone.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The perfect film for anyone who likes their headbutting and kickboxing dressed up in gold brocade, frilly collars, and tri-cornered caps. And isn't that all of us?
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Has its effectively nasty, chilling moments -- and it also brings body piercing to new heights of ickiness.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A harmless and mildly amusing family comedy.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Somewhat fleeter and more engaging than its predecessor.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Chan's signature mix of screwball comedy and gymnastic derring-do landed him his own cartoon series a few years back, and The Medallion -- with its bumbling spies and bounding star -- is about as cartoonish as live action gets.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    As a character study, City by the Sea is engaging. As a police thriller, it's not all there.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Despite its haunting artistry and its winning eccentricities, The Shipping News is a vehicle that's still very much at sea.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An enjoyable throwback to the way monster movies used to be made.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Never as much fun as (Woo's) old Chow Yun Fat-starring Chinese pics.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Scott and Davis bring heart-rending sadness and telling detail to their roles, and imbue Secret Lives with something real and true.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Lightweight, likable buppie romantic comedy.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Funny and not-funny, slapstick and slapdash, Welcome to Collinwood is a seriously uneven caper comedy in which a bunch of really fine character actors get to act really, really silly.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Sweet-natured but overdone, over-long film.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Hackman's in it a lot, and he is, as almost always, great fun.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A wholesome little drama aimed at the pre- and early-teen crowd.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Terminator 3 moves at not-quite-breakneck speed, and the shape-shifting, metal-melting special effects aren't exactly spectacular.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Williamson's screenplay doesn't match the cleverness of his conceit; it lacks the requisite archness and wit.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Tries too hard to be playful and sensual, wacky and romantic, and comes away feeling fake and prefabricated instead.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's low-grade Casablanca - an ill-fated love affair, rife with murder and deceit, with World War II as a backdrop and a farewell scene that has something to do with getting to Paris.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Although the sequel retains its predecessor's breezy retro spirit, The Mummy Returns is a mite darker and scarier and the effects a little spiffier.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Terribly slight and a little off.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Krueger's comedy doesn't always spark, but its underlying intelligence - not to mention Graham's eyes - shines through.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A squirmingly strange and brutal study of sexual power, masochism and mother-daughter madness.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Elevated beyond its cutesy contrivances and mawkishness by some extraordinarily good performances.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Femme Fatale is glossy, glamorous cinema as collage. Maybe all the pieces of a truly good film noir are here, but the filmmaker has opted simply to toss them into the air and let them fall where they may.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The good thing about The Company is that nothing much happens. The bad thing about The Company is that nothing much happens.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Fails on a couple of levels. It never really gives you a sense of the psychology, the root causes behind Glass' elaborate frauds... And since we don't know the why, the how becomes considerably less interesting.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Perhaps to compensate for the absence of compelling drama and tension (and a few continuity gaffes), Scott has retreated to his TV commercial roots and crammed Hannibal full of busy, art-directed visuals.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An interesting choice for a Valentine's Day outing, He Loves Me is a weird, bubbly cocktail -- effervescent charm and troubling pathology, shaken together.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Never going to be remembered as a tying-the-knot screwball classic (it probably won't be remembered past March), but one could do worse.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Beyond turbocharged. It whooshes along at warp speed. And still, despite some awesomely choreographed stunts and the two stars' pedal-to-the-metal appeal, the movie seems endless.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Boasts exceedingly high levels of improbability and an embarrassment of continuity and character shortfalls, but still has a certain bubbleheaded charm.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Plays around with some interesting notions, such as the nature of reality, the nature of humanity, and the nature of spiffy apartments with sleek bathroom fixtures.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A yawning affair that would be a perfectly fine video rental but doesn't really require the big screen.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Clones makes the Frodo-speak of "Lord of the Rings" sound like Noel Coward.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Not as consistently or uproariously funny as "American Pie," but it does have a Zen zaniness that gives it center as well as edge.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    This violently comic caper has some spunky charm going for it -- but has a lot of self-consciously hip, studied wackiness going against it.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Clunky and unsurprising.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Skarsgard's performance is bold and raw (and reminiscent of vintage Jack Lemmon in its earnestness).
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Doesn't have the dramatic heft to warrant all its angst and anguish.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A massive compendium of youth-movie/pedal-to-the-metal cliches. But man, is it fast!
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A modest and obviously heartfelt endeavor.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's a cinematic feat, an art lover's dream, but as a moviegoing experience, Alexander Sokurov's Russian Ark is something of a letdown.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Easy to like, and easy to forget.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Max
    This film is a philosophical musing -- a humanitarian speculation, not a drama about real people, historical figures or not, who seem fully formed.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A stage-y but likable ensemble piece.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A pumped-up, plotless montage of extraordinary landscapes, colorful wildlife, and interesting people performing feats of derring-do.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    As a thriller, In the Cut, with its red herring characters and plot twists, turns dopey and predictable. As a portrait of a single woman, burned by love and wary of what's in store, Campion's movie has its trenchant, telling passages.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Fans of swooping helicopter shots, alleys filled with backlit geysers of steam, and jump-cut editing that makes MTV look like Ingmar Bergman will relish the intercontinental intrigue and huggermugger that is Spy Game.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    There are chases that feel way too long, and dialogue that feels flat. Affleck and Thurman make a handsome duo, but there's no spark between the actors.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Despite a strong cast and a willingness to lampoon the fundamentals of fundamentalism, Saved! isn't as funny, or as wicked, as it should be.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Brought to the screen with a mix of jaunty humor and jagged violence that should have worked more effectively than it does.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Quite possibly the biggest ego trip ever to play Cannes, or anywhere else, at any time.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Too freewheeling for its own good, like a Robert Altman ensemble piece without a gravitational core. But Hawke's actors are a talented troupe, and even when things get self-indulgent and fuzzy-headed (and boy, do they!), interesting stuff is going on.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A meditation on guilt, remorse and redemption -- is unrelentingly heavy.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The screenplay of Open Range, credited to one Craig Storper, is an awesome compendium of cowboy-movie cliches. It borders on parody, and often crosses the border, rustling up a drove of oater aphorisms.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Rourke and Roberts! Dueling kings of B-movie excess and cable-TV schlock, together again on the big screen! Talk about chemistry!
    • 22 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Yes, it's stupid. But sometimes it's stupid with a capital S, and it's in those moments of transcendent idiocy that you can't help liking Saving Silverman. At least, a little bit.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The best reason to see Along Came Polly is the supporting cast.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Heartfelt and artfully shot, the movie - with little Rodrigo Noya, wearing big eyeglasses, in the title role - is too sweet for its own good, even as some of its characters do things that aren't terribly sweet at all.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    The beautiful Wright Penn has a harder time anchoring the free-spirited Clare in territory that feels honest and true - there's a stagey quality to the actress' performance that goes beyond the stagey quality of her character.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    While it flirts with "After School Special"-ness, at least has the courage to address racial and cultural cliches with a degree of honesty.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Yes, there's a hastily added new ending - an ending that doesn't make sense when you think about it. Not that it's worth the effort
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Christopher Walken has the best moments in the whole thing, portraying the wacked-out auteur of the Gwen-and-Eddie vehicle. Sadly, he's only in America's Sweethearts a few hilarious minutes.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A bit of a one-joke wonder.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's not just Hollywood convention that gets in the way of the story, it's the lack of depth, heft and heart at its core.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Its grossness knows no bounds, and you'd have to be dead not to laugh.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Despite some fine, nuanced acting (it's Lane's movie, to be sure), Unfaithful doesn't get much deeper than a romance novel.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Classy but ultimately unsatisfying film.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    An entertaining history lesson. That is, a history lesson that synopsizes and simplifies a complex life and complicated times into easily digestible panels of action, intrigue, martyrdom and sticking it to the papacy.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Your body's sitting there in the theater, but it feels as if your head is someplace else.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Girl With a Pearl Earring is really about watching paint dry. S l o w l y.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Whether he's smacking into an iceberg or flopping topless onto a sandy beach, DiCaprio is still maddeningly lightweight.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Gyllenhaal, in the pivotal role, brings a scruffy, boyish charm to the proceedings, but his big scenes with Hoffman and Sarandon are one-sided - he's not in the same league, and comes off as a bit of a cipher.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A likable, low-budget high school comedy.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    This is an A-list cast toiling on a C-list screenplay.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    It's a hokey piece of melodrama in a movie that cheats its characters - and its audience - out of some emotional truth.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Starts having the same effect as one too many tequilas: the Hong Kong-style stunts, the goofy wisecracks, the foxy presence of Eva Mendes -- all of it becomes blurry and numbing.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Beautiful to behold but lacking in any kind of palpable dread or suspense.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A downer of a drama.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A handsome-looking movie that's full of the muted greens, browns and grays of the tony Hamptons, director Williams' tale never quite finds its footing.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Visually dazzling but ultimately dizzying ride, a trippy suspenser that gets tripped up on its own deja vu voodoo.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Too bad Chocolat isn't as seductive as its leading lady.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Very slight and, in the early going, slightly annoying, Coffee and Cigarettes is a long-borning Jarmusch project.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Never mind the cool, convincing effects (and they are cool), The Day After Tomorrow teems with illogical action, improbable coincidences. It's pure escapist fare, a popcorn gobbler.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Plot contrivances, including an ominous cowboy-hatted figure who stalks Bitsey and her tagalong intern (Gabriel Mann), undermine the story's serious political themes.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Visually, taking its cues (mostly) from Van Allsburg's Hopperesque art, The Polar Express is eye-popping. Storywise, however, it can be eyelid-drooping.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    Ray
    It's a shame about Ray, because Foxx is trapped in a movie that takes the music icon's unique story and turns it into cheesy, sentimental American Dream cliches.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    As for Duff, she's bright-eyed and bubbly, though her singing talents are nowhere near as awesome as Raise Your Voice's who's-going-to-win-the-big-scholarship plotline requires.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Rea
    A tale of disaffection, devastation and epiphanies of the catastrophic kind.