Todd McCarthy

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For 1,541 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Todd McCarthy's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Million Dollar Baby
Lowest review score: 0 Showgirls
Score distribution:
1541 movie reviews
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Despite its indie-flavored shooting style, first-rate visual effects, reasonable intensity factor, nihilistic attitude and post-9/11 anxiety overlay, this punchy sci-fier is, in the end, not much different from all the marauding creature features that have come before it.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Harris' first directorial outing since his impressive and entirely different "Pollock" biopic bears echoes of many genre predecessors, especially Howard Hawks' "Rio Bravo" -- but echoes they remain.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Impressively rendered but oddly uninviting adventure.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The film represents the director in a more pensive, even philosophical vein, less interested in propulsive cinema and more reflective about what would seem to mean the most to him—dreams, and the ability to make them come true. This is what The BFG is about but, unfortunately, that is basically all it’s about and by a considerable measure too explicitly and single-mindedly so.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A protracted parade of woefully familiar motifs from the Amerindie playbook, Happy Endings comes off like an undernourished Paul Thomas Anderson wannabe.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Columbus' approach is intended to cloak such topics as mortality and human identity in the warm glow of greeting card sentiment, which renders the prescription palatable for mass consumption but hopelessly diluted.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Desperately uncertain in tone and able to generate only sporadic laughs, pic decks out its meager story of revenge and comeuppance with a vulgar, flashy shimmer that will no doubt attract teenage girls, or the core "Clueless" audience.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A compelling and little-known story of the Civil War period is studiously reduced to a dry and cautious history lesson in Free State of Jones.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Like many action stars, Statham is good at cool brooding, but West's frantic style works against this.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The season's first comet-targets-Earth special effects extravaganza is spectacular enough in its cataclysmic scenes of the planet being devastated by an unstoppable fireball, but proves far from thrilling in the down time spent with a largely dull assortment of troubled human beings.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    This first dramatic feature by "Hoop Dreams" director Steve James has one foot still squarely planted in the docu aesthetic and notably lacks any psychological interest or emotional depth.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A nice looking but heavily formulaic DreamWorks animation entry.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Surprisingly lacks a feeling of personal urgency and insight that would have made it a distinctive, even unique contribution to the considerable number of films that deal with the war in general and Holocaust in particular.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Nothing about the project's execution inspires the feeling that this was ever intended as anything more than a lark, which would be fine if it were a good one. As it is, audience teeth-grinding sets in early and never lets up.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Beautifully crafted and highlighted by an arresting change-of-pace perf by Meg Ryan as an English teacher erotically awakened by a homicide detective. But the story's unpalatable narrative holes and dramatic missteps will hold sway over the pic's better qualities.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A low-impact romantic comedy-drama from James L. Brooks in which the central characters are strangely disconnected from one another as well as from the audience.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Entombs its characters so thoroughly in a prison of palpably predestined tragedy that one knows from the outset that the very worst that can happen most certainly will.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The Bronze is a strident comedy made in accordance with the sole guiding principle of, when in doubt, go even more vulgar.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    In trying to merge this alarmist theme with an old-fashioned murder mystery, the filmmakers throw at least one plot-twist sucker-punch too many, leaving the viewer with an “Oh, come on” reaction to the entire film.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Simultaneously contrived and genuinely felt.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Has absolutely nothing to say about its characters and their lamentable actions.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    If the story is meant to represent a microcosm of the immigration problem, it’s woefully reductive. If it’s meant to be first and foremost an action thriller, it does have a few nice moves to offer.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The demoralizing slide of the relationship between Francois Truffaut and Jean-Luc Godard, from artistic comrades-in-arms during the thrilling creation of the nouvelle vague to name-calling enemies from the early '70s onward, is charted in overly academic and constricted fashion in Two in the Wave.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    This quite mediocre spawned-from-television feature feels like a Jesus film designed primarily for true believers, meaning that the faith-based public that has already been put on alert by seal-of-approval-dispensing church leaders that this is a film to see will make the Fox release into a significant Heartland attraction.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    What they have done is taken a few second-hand ideas from noir and speculative fiction and mixed them in occasionally striking ways, even if, in the end, the result isn't all that much fun.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Something less than monumental, The Monuments Men wears its noble purpose on its sleeve when either greater grit or more irreverence could have put the same tale across to modern audiences with more punch and no loss of import.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    An attempt to merge a semi-jokey buddy movie with a more realistic account of cops' messy private lives, Hollywood Homicide falls short on both counts.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    As much a trifle as its title suggests, My Blueberry Nights sees Hong Kong stylist Wong Kar Wai applying his characteristic visual and thematic doodles to a wispy story of lovelorn Yanks.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    That the film mostly falls flat has far more to do with the largely unconvincing material rather than with the co-stars, who are more than game for often clownish shenanigans Black and his co-writer Anthony Bagarozzi have concocted for them; in fit and starts, the actors display a buoyant comic rapport.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    It all ends up being a half-hour too much of a just okay thing.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    For all its clever design, beguiling creatures and witty actors, the picture feels far more conventional than it should; it's a Disney film illustrated by Burton, rather than a Burton film that happens to be released by Disney.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    In a role that Tom Hanks might have played a decade or so ago, Perry is pretty bland and doesn't provide any hints as to why Alex is so emotionally stymied.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Pfeiffer tackles the part with obvious dedication, but she's thwarted from the get-go by the heavily proscribed nature of the role as written.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Shortchanging traditional animation by literalizing it while robbing actors of their full range of facial expressiveness, the performance-capture technique favored by director Robert Zemeckis looks more than ever like the emperor's new clothes in Disney's A Christmas Carol.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The souffle falls a little flat in The Ladykillers, a Coen brothers black comedy in which the humor seems arch and narrative momentum doesn't kick in until the final third.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A woefully predictable imperiled-yuppie-family-under-siege suspenser that hardly seems worth the attention of its relatively high-profile participants.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Feels slight and pretty ordinary by the end, with no edge or compelling insights, just a reasonable feel for teen attitudes and banter.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A partly smart, mostly dumb addition to the teen horror sweepstakes -- smart in how it neatly catches the petty, hurtful, sexy and druggy aspects of high school life, dumb in how it makes absolutely no sense once its resolution is known.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Half-intriguing, half-tedious.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Director David Gordon Green has created some fresh, penetrating, beautifully drawn scenes of one-on-one intimacy…But some of what surrounds these interludes is variously misguided, fuzzy and borderline pretentious.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Well-wrought individual scenes and sharply focused acting provide Rebecca Miller's third feature with a measure of gravity, but too much abrupt, even melodramatic behavior and undigested psychological matter leave nagging dissatisfactions.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A sort of maritime Donner Party, In the Heart of the Sea is a rugged but underwhelming true-life drama of a cursed 19th century whaling voyage.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Feels like a film that should have been made at least 25 years ago. Or made as a period piece. Heavy, doom-laden and, unfortunately, entirely predictable.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The Client is a satisfactory, by-the-numbers child-in-jeopardy thriller that will fill the bill as a very commercial hot weather popcorn picture.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Nowhere to be found is any dramatic surprise, heightening of the pulse or genuine pulling of heartstrings. Gary Winick's direction consists of button pushing, and the mechanics are palpable at every step.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Even with the addition of new characters, such as the ones voiced by Brad Pitt and Matt Damon, George Miller's animated sequel just isn't very funny.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Despite its undeniably pure and earnest intent, Solaris is equally undeniably an arid, dull affair that imposes and maintains a huge distance between the viewer and what happens onscreen.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Although the humor helps, the Groundhog Day-like repetition gets tedious; it makes you feel more like a hamster than a groundhog — or rather a hamster's wheel, going round and round, over and over again.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The gaps between the hipster comedy of the star, the incipient sentimentality of the story and the gravely depressing reality of the setting provide tonal abysses simply too vast to bridge in Rock the Kasbah, an intermittently amusing but dramatically problematic mish-mash that careens all over a rough and rocky road.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Compared with high-powered action specialists like James Cameron, director Charles Russell seems content to accomplish just one thing per shot, getting the essentials on the screen but creating no special dynamic or look.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    There is a sense of bloat and where-do-we-go-from here aimlessness to this unconscionably protracted undertaking.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Nicely cast and made with as much conviction as can be brought to something so intrinsically formulaic.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The film is offbeat, silly, disarming and loopy all at the same time, and viewers will decide to ride with that or just give up on it, according to mood and disposition.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    More than even the most faithful of the earlier episodes, this film feels devoted above all to reproducing the novel onscreen as closely as possible, an impulse that drags it toward ponderousness at times and rather sorely tests the abilities of the young actors to hold the screen entirely on their own, without being propped up by the ever-fabulous array of character actors the series offers.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Anthony and Joe Russo place too much faith in the ability of their talented thesps to carry the day over precariously thin material.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Although arresting in spots, it falls far short of bringing out the full values of the play, and doesn't approach the emotional resonance of Franco Zeffirelli's immensely popular 1968 screen version.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    For those always on the lookout for the "funny" Allen, this one definitely has its moments, but too much of the picture is flat, dispiriting and frankly unbelievable in fundamental ways that defy the granting of poetic license.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Routine, superficial manhunt stuff.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A creakily old-fashioned comedy that forgot to pack the laughs along with the nudging and kvetching.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    When Coppola finds creative nirvana, he frequently has trouble delivering the full goods. Tetro represents something of a middle ground in that respect.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates rates medium on the grossness scale (an all-body, pre-marital naked-Indian-guru-administered massage for the bride with a happy ending, anyone?), and pretty high in crude talk. But it's kind of a dud when it comes to endurance and imaginative moves.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A moderately amusing but very uneven revisionist adventure with franchise and theme park intentions written all over it...This attempt by Verbinski and producer Jerry Bruckheimer to plant the flag for another Pirates of the Caribbean-scaled series tries to have it too many ways tonally, resulting in a work that wobbles and thrashes all over the place as it attempts to find the right groove.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Comes across in muted fashion, with uninvolving characters and lack of genuine excitement or fright creating a second-rate, second-hand feel.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Pfister, who, like his mentor Nolan, adamantly continues to shoot on film (not digital), shows a sure hand at staging scenes, creating visuals and setting a tone -- if only all the diverse elements here fit comfortably under the same tent.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Malick's exalted visuals and isolated metaphysical epiphanies are ill-supported by a muddled, lurching narrative, resulting in a sprawling, unfocused account of an epochal historical moment.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Individual scenes in actor Justin Theroux's directorial debut possess a certain flair, but the central issue on which the story turns -- how obnoxious and mean-spirited can you be and still get someone to love you? -- presents a forbidding obstacle.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Mismatched marriage of offbeat character study and unimaginative horror riffs. Most compelling element by far is Bruce Campbell's inspired performance as a nursing home patient who insists he is the real Elvis Presley.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Sports some tasty scenes, mostly in the first half, but also pushes 007 into CGI-driven, quasi-sci-fi territory that feels like a betrayal of what the franchise has always been about.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The sensitive macho Schoenaerts is pretty much center-screen throughout this sleekly made suspense piece based on a script more loaded with holes than the numerous bad guys he either shoots or stabs to death.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A pale reworking of its predecessor.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Like his previous efforts, Jarmusch's sidelong take on Western conventions relies upon quirky tone, hipsterish performances and a highly refined visual style to put it over.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    If you’re going to attempt a quasi-farcical look at the behavior of thirtysomething strivers in Hollywood, you need to cut more sharply and dig more deeply than does L.A. Times.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    This franchise-hungry champion of the underdog brings no sense of fun to his pursuit of bad guys; it's just the fate he's stuck with.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    As an exercise in style, it's diverting enough, but these mean streets are so well traveled that it takes someone like Eva Green to make the detour through them worth the trip.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The Basketball Diaries is a weak-tea rendition of Jim Carroll's much-admired cult tome about his teenage drug addiction. Leonardo DiCaprio's committed lead performance deserves a better context than this gloss on the source material.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The Rum Diary remains a relatively mild diversion, not at all unpleasant but neither compelling nor convulsive.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    On their own, individual scenes are effective enough in semi-farcically portraying the ignorance, avoidance and/or downright denial by the practitioners of bad loans. Together, however, they are wearying in their repetitive nature.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A junior-league "Superbad" with an aftertaste of "The Pacifier," Drillbit Taylor is a just passable pubescent comedy with a modest laugh count by Apatow factory standards.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Penn's magnetism and hesitant line delivery create what interest there is, although the whole picture suffers from a central figure who can never get it together on any level.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Once you realize the film is just going to be a string of encomiums against a backdrop of frantically edited archival material in which few shots are allowed to stay onscreen longer than three seconds, it's clear that no meaningful analysis of the woman's career or political agenda will be forthcoming.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    With Melissa McCarthy playing a one-woman demolition team who, for 95 percent of the running time, is a genuine affront to nature, there are unavoidably some laughs here, although the gifted comic actor got more of them in less screen time in her previous films than she does in this starring role.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Visually, the film is without flair or ambition, conveying no sense of atmosphere or mood. But the performances put it over.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Earnest and well-intentioned.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A superficially diverting but substance-free concoction, a would-be thriller as evanescent as a magic trick and one that develops no suspense or rooting interest because the characters possess all the substance of invisible ink.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Dazzlingly designed and staged in a theatrical setting so as to suggest that the characters are enacting assigned roles in life, this tight and pacy telling of a 900 page-plus novel touches a number of its important bases but lacks emotional depth, moral resonance and the simple ability to allow its rich characters to experience and drink deeply of life.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The imaginatively illustrated but precariously precious film offers up a string of minor pleasures but never becomes more than moderately amusing or involving.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Lacks the special creative spark needed to lift it to an uncommon imaginative level.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    An attractively designed but narratively challenged, one-note film.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Laura Linney’s beautiful performance is most of the story in p.s.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The picture serves up intermittent pleasures but is too raggedy and laid-back for its own good, its images evaporating nearly as soon as they hit the screen.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    What might have been an effective fantasy if handled with sophistication and insouciance is instead weighed down by ponderous pacing, overstuffed production values and an instance of miscasting.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    An intriguingly plotted mystery that unfortunately forgets to put the noir in film noir. A drab, pale-looking affair without a trace of visual style, this cross-country pursuit yarn fights a losing battle to sustain viewer attention via narrative alone, so much does it flounder for lack of imagistic flair.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    A game and winning performance by Melinda Page Hamilton is the only saving grace.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Shows the sort of edge in places that will be appreciated by horror fanboys of all ages, but is mostly too overwrought and over-the-top.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Aside from spasms of brutal violence, however, there's nothing rousing or new here.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The Pact demonstrates both why people respond to horror and why it's so routinely scorned.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    At best an honorable failure, an intelligent and ambitious picture that crucially lacks dramatic flair and emotional involvement.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Predictable, cutesy and nowhere near hot-blooded enough.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    As easy on the eyes and ears as it is embalmed from any dramatic point of view.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Despite her (Judd's) efforts and those of a generally talented cast, picture just pokes along and offers nothing out of the ordinary in terms of drama, characterization or insight. Judd's presence notwithstanding, this one would be more at home on small than on big screens.

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