Todd McCarthy

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For 1,650 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Todd McCarthy's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Traffic
Lowest review score: 0 Being Human
Score distribution:
1650 movie reviews
    • 27 Metascore
    • 20 Todd McCarthy
    A sense of heaviness, gloom and complete disappointment settles in during the second half, as the mundane set-up results in no dramatic or sensory dividends whatsoever.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Todd McCarthy
    The formula of ingredients is familiar and time-tested, to be sure, but some cocktails go down much better than others and McQuarrie and company have gotten theirs just right here.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 40 Todd McCarthy
    At isolated moments a tolerably amusing send-up of alien invasion disaster movies in which the attackers are video arcade-era renegades arrived to gobble up as many famous landmarks as possible, this one-note comedy runs out of gas within an hour (it is based on a short film) and should have been trimmed to a neat 90 minutes.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Todd McCarthy
    The clear-eyed film dedicates itself to breaking through the debris of cliched, one-dimensional public impressions of vets, bikers, immigrant wives and kids and trailer-park lifestyles as it fashions an involving portrait of a deeply scarred man sustained by certain rituals and an unextinguished sense of empathy for others’s problems.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Although the story dynamics are fundamentally silly and the family stuff, with its parallel father-daughter melodrama, is elemental button-pushing, a good cast led by a winning Paul Rudd puts the nonsense over in reasonably disarming fashion.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    In its considered, neatly packaged way, the film occupies a safe and solid middle-class middle ground in teen storyland, between crass gross-out comedies and mawkish romance on one side and edgy, exploratory indie fare on the other.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Todd McCarthy
    Magic Mike XXL is ridiculously entertaining.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Todd McCarthy
    Action scenes are accumulated as if mandated by a stop-watch and almost invariably seem like warmed-over versions of stuff we've seen before, in Terminator entries and elsewhere.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Todd McCarthy
    An enthrallingly intimate look at the brilliant, troubled and always charismatic screen legend.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Intensely self-conscious of its status as a cultural commodity even as it devotedly follows the requisite playbook for mass-audience blockbuster fare, Jurassic World can reasonably lay claim to the number two position among the four series entries, as it goes down quite a bit easier than the previous two sequels.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Todd McCarthy
    Hakonarson observes all this with the practiced eye of a good documentarian but, in the compositions, the rigorous timing of the editing and the performances of the two leads, he lifts the material beyond the observational to a modestly accomplished work that not only neatly observes an obscure lifestyle but brings to life a most peculiar sibling relationship.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 30 Todd McCarthy
    Gus Van Sant’s sticky, gooey side — previously on display in the likes of Finding Forrester and especially in the 2011 Restless — oozes out once more in the woefully sentimental and maudlin The Sea of Trees.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Todd McCarthy
    The violence of the inter-American drug trade has served as the backdrop for any number of films for more than three decades, but few have been as powerful and superbly made as Sicario.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 100 Todd McCarthy
    Youth is a voluptuary’s feast, a full-body immersion in the sensory pleasures of the cinema.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    The sensitive macho Schoenaerts is pretty much center-screen throughout this sleekly made suspense piece based on a script more loaded with holes than the numerous bad guys he either shoots or stabs to death.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 Todd McCarthy
    Blanchett makes an indelible impression as a woman who, through breeding, intense personal cultivation and social expectations, has brilliantly mastered the skill of navigating through life.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Todd McCarthy
    It’s an audacious concept, and Docter’s imagination, along with those of his numerous collaborators, is adventurous and genially daft enough to put it over.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 90 Todd McCarthy
    All hands on both sides of the camera do outstanding work. Clooney seems to be enjoying himself thoroughly as the old grump whose creative flame hasn’t been entirely extinguished, but it falls more to Robertson to carry the film, which she does with great energy and appeal.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Todd McCarthy
    The first two Max features ran barely 90 minutes and it takes guts and real confidence to dare push a straight chase film with very little dialogue to two hours. But Miller has pulled it off by coming up with innumerable new elements to keep the action compelling.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 30 Todd McCarthy
    The film is essentially nothing but little and ineffectual bits of recycled shtick with no sense of freshness of invention. And the women never bond in even the most rote or superficial way that's expected in this sort of claptrap.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 Todd McCarthy
    In every sense, The Great Museum (Das grosse Museum) imparts a feeling of privilege — privilege on the part of those (the Hapsburgs) who built and opened Vienna's extraordinary Kunsthistorisches Museum in 1891, privilege among those lucky enough to work at such a rarified establishment and privilege on the part of any viewer of Johannes Holzhausen's wonderfully evocative and droll documentary.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Todd McCarthy
    Avengers: Age of Ultron succeeds in the top priority of creating a worthy opponent for its superheroes and giving the latter a few new things to do, but this time the action scenes don't always measure up and some of the characters are left in a kind of dramatic no-man's-land.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Todd McCarthy
    Just as the basic plot points are hard to swallow, even the most rudimentary aspects of the characters' interactions feel forced, artificial and unspontaneous.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Todd McCarthy
    Given the challenge of solving a problem like Bathsheba, Mulligan succeeds, more than Christie did, in providing an answer.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Todd McCarthy
    Clever enough to provoke a few abrupt laughs along the way, this big screen debut for two television stalwarts, director Matt Shakman (It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia) and writer Robert Patino (Sons of Anarchy, Prime Suspect), is sabotaged by some frightfully on-the-nose expository dialogue and an adamantly prosaic visual style.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Todd McCarthy
    The story keeps everyone in motion all night long, and frantically so, to the point that it could easily have been titled Non-Stop 2.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Todd McCarthy
    The spectacle of a dissolute hedonist suddenly acquiring a heart and a conscience late in life is shamelessly, and shamefully, contrived in its emotional trajectory.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 30 Todd McCarthy
    With unappealing one-note characters, retread concepts and implausible motivations, Chappie is a further downward step for director Neill Blomkamp.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    This ultra-slick, fantasy-inducing visit to an international wonder world of wealth and deception plays more like an inventory of thieving and gambling techniques than a captivating diversion, even if it's hard not to be voyeuristically pulled in by some of its ruses.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Todd McCarthy
    Malick's most distinctive ambition here is his attempt to create an almost pointilistic portrait of a man by evoking acute moments of his past and present, and this sustains real interest for a while, as you wait to see how it all might come together. But as the film just keeps offering more of the same...it doesn't build or pay off with what it seems designed to do, which is to provide either a dramatic or philosophical apotheosis.

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