Tom Huddleston

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For 222 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 37% higher than the average critic
  • 8% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Tom Huddleston's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Lowest review score: 20 Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 63 out of 222
  2. Negative: 11 out of 222
222 movie reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Tom Huddleston
    At once an investigation, a polemic and, in its final sequences, a tribute to human endurance. A remarkable film.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Tom Huddleston
    What 12 Years a Slave is really interested in is creating an honest, believable experience: in culture and context, place and people, soil and skin. The result can, at times, be alienating.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Tom Huddleston
    It’s the most haunted and dreamlike of all American films, a gothic backwoods ramble with the Devil at its heels.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Tom Huddleston
    It’s impossible adequately to describe the haunting intensity of It Follows: this is a film that makes a virtue of silence, that lives in the shadowy spaces between the splattery kill scenes that punctuate your average stalk-and-slasher.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Tom Huddleston
    Jennifer Peedom’s film is stunningly photographed (how could it not be?) and brilliantly sly: she gives the tour guides and their rich, self-absorbed charges just enough rope to hang themselves, and they duly oblige. But it’s also a heartfelt tribute to the resilience of a people.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Tom Huddleston
    Best of all is Steven Spielberg’s direction: the camera moves like a predatory animal, gliding eerily across the surface of the vast Atlantic, creating sequences of almost unbearable suspense.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Tom Huddleston
    It’s one of the most insightful films ever made about the British class system.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Tom Huddleston
    This is quite simply one of the saddest movies ever made, a tale of loss, grief and absolute loneliness, an unflinching stare into the darkest moral abyss.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Tom Huddleston
    [A] calm, reflective, gorgeously uneventful slice of nostalgic romance.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Tom Huddleston
    The word "personal" is bandied around a lot in film reviews, but it’s hard to think of a work that better fits the description than avant-garde icon Chantal Akerman’s intimate swansong No Home Movie.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    It may lack its predecessor’s lofty ambitions, but once the bullets, spears and hairy fists start flying you’ll be too wrapped up to care.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    Overall this is giddy, ridiculous fun, a witty, wacky and wonderfully generous sugary gift of a film.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    The overall impression is one of unbridled enthusiasm on the part of the film’s makers, both for its predecessors and for the brave new universe Abrams and his crew are exploring.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    Low key and occasionally frustrating it may be, but Computer Chess is a supremely intelligent, beautifully constructed film, interweaving comedy and character, satire and subtext, and loaded with more ideas than some filmmakers manage in a lifetime.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    A nagging sense of incompleteness means that Civil War isn’t quite as satisfying as the first ‘Avengers’ (it’s all building up to the ‘Infinity War’ two-parter in 2018). But overall, this is Marvel at their best: a pacey, intelligent super-sized blockbuster and a roaringly fun night out.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    Director Athina Rachel Tsangari keeps things brisk, maintaining an almost nature-doc distance from her subjects. Her affection for them is plain, but that doesn’t mean she lets them off the hook.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    An enormously satisfying film: carefully observed and consistently compelling, it feels like an instant American classic, if a minor one.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    This isn’t just the best-looking film of the year, it’s one of the most awe-inspiring achievements in the history of special-effects cinema. So it’s a shame that – as is so often the case with groundbreaking effects movies – the emotional content can’t quite match up to the visual.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    In the closing act, the film sharpens and becomes something far more compelling.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    We Are the Best! is a joyous celebration of youth, friendship and rebellion, and if there’s a nagging note of regret and bitterness it never manages to undermine the overwhelmingly compassionate tone.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    For this slick, beautifully paced documentary, director Marc Singer was given unprecedented access to everything from police tapes to trial recordings to Dunn’s own private phone conversations, and the result is a uniquely compelling real-life legal thriller.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    This is all fun all the time, a dizzying carnival of wisecracks, fisticuffs, explosions, chases and truly eye-popping effects.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    This is a forceful, initially uplifting, ultimately sobering illustration of how much protest matters, how far those in power will go to stifle it, and how ugly and criminal those efforts look in hindsight.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    The action sequences are wild, the jokes relentlessly dumb-but-smart, and the sheer sense of anything-goes daftness...is glorious.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    The Commune may veer towards sentimentality in the final act...but overall this is a warm, sharply characterised and absorbing melodrama.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    The visuals are painstaking and horribly beautiful – shades of Hitchcock, Carpenter, even Spielberg – while the gore scenes are truly outrageous, knocking cheap imitators (hey, Nicolas Winding Refn, this is how it’s done) into a cocked hat.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    This isn’t quite tense or funny enough to become the masterpiece some Hawks lovers claim. But it is smart, incisive and often very funny.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    Scorsese never digs too deeply under the skin of these reprehensible playboy douchebags, and there are times where the swooping photography, smash-and-grab editing and toe-tapping soundtrack conspire to almost – almost – make us like them. But when the film’s cylinders are firing, it’s impossible not to be dragged along.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    Role Models isn’t trying to reinvent the wheel, just polish it up a little. What emerges is a memorable slice of modern slapstick, with charm to spare and just a touch of soul.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    Focusing on the personalities rather than the historical context, directors Robert Gordon and Morgan Neville illustrate how both men’s lives were changed by the debates, and how neither could let it go even decades later. The result is perhaps better suited to TV than the big screen, but it’s a timely, thoughtful piece of work.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    It’s a dour, at times glacial film that perhaps takes itself just a little too seriously, but it’s also grimly convincing and, in a remarkable final scene, shockingly effective.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    This is a woman who has been through hell and come out kicking, and the result is as much a celebration of her life as it is a documentary.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    There may be little here we haven’t seen before – glassy reflections of Michael Mann’s Heat pop up everywhere you look – but it’s all carried off with brashness and momentum by a director who genuinely seems to be having a blast.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    Unique and intoxicating, an art movie that grips like a thriller.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    Berberian Sound Studio is like nothing before – and whether or not it ‘works’ seems almost irrelevant. In this era of cookie-cutter cinema, Strickland’s deeply personal moral and stylistic vision deserves the highest praise.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    Ida
    Pawlikowski’s film may be bleak and unforgiving, but it’s also richly sympathetic and deeply moving.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    Cameraman and director Michael Heineman has created a riveting story of how, with awful inevitability, power always corrupts.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    With gorgeously crisp photography and pitch-perfect performances from the two leads, this is one of the most intriguing and thoughtful American films of the year.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    This hugely entertaining oddity could never be mistaken for the work of any other filmmaker.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    A startling examination of how artistic principles translate into real-world actions, and a moving portrait of a genuinely, unexpectedly brave man.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    Any film that teams up gruffer-than-thou icons Shepard and Johnson is bound to go heavy on the testosterone, but Mickle undercuts all this strident manliness with a rich vein of self-mocking wit and paternal angst.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    This is a film built on sensation, misdirection and randomness. The result can be maddeningly obtuse, but it’s also breathtakingly lovely and genuinely unsettling.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    The result is entertaining and insightful, balancing cold statistics with real-life stories of success and tragedy, presenting a broad, clear-eyed view of an increasingly complex issue.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    A lusty ballad of love and heartbreak sung with passion and power, and just a handful of off-key notes.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    A title like that needs balls of brass to back it up. Luckily, this fiery college comedy from feature-debuting writer-director Justin Simien, loosely inspired by a series of scandalous black-face parties at all-white fraternities, is full of punchy intelligence and barely concealed anger.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    An empathetic, often heartbreaking piece of work, at times tough to watch – one party scene is particularly grim and confrontational – at others calm and contemplative.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    This might be the most downbeat blockbuster in memory, a film that starts out pitiless and goes downhill from there, save for a fleeting glimmer of hope in the final moments. It’s a bold statement about the unforgiving nature of war, unashamedly political in its motives and quietly devastating in its emotional effect.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    This is a tighter, smarter film than either Shaun of the Dead or Hot Fuzz, and buried beneath all the blue-goo aliens and terrible punning is a heartfelt meditation on the perils and pleasures of nostalgia.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    The LEGO Movie is sheer joy: the script is witty, the satire surprisingly pointed and the animation tactile and imaginative.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    Abrahamson has pulled off something quietly remarkable: a study of morality which never feels like a treatise, a bracingly realistic film about teenagers which never becomes patronising and a gripping melodrama which swerves sentiment. He may also have unearthed a genuine star.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    This is a confident, terrifically enjoyable film, superbly written, shot and performed.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    It’s infuriatingly irresistible.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    What emerges is a sympathetic portrait of a genuinely idiosyncratic, outrageous individual whose towering musical talent never stood a chance against his rampaging personal demons.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    Using home-video footage and talking-head interviews, Dinosaur 13 dramatically depicts the thrill of archaeological discovery. But the overbearing soundtrack and shots of weeping palaeontologists do feel a touch manipulative.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    The film can feel truncated, as if only a longer film or TV series could do proper justice to the details of the story. But it’s a sensitive and moving tale nonetheless.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    Folman’s vision is just too personal and obtuse, and the result can feel rather like watching someone else drop acid, enjoying their giddy descriptions of all the pretty colours but unable to fully engage.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    Riz Ahmed is superb as Changez (pronounced Chan-Gez, not like the Bowie song),
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    It’s a wild, at times exhilarating watch – but an exhausting one.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    It’s disappointing when Starred Up begins to lapse into soapy cliché.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    This is a solid take on the material, but it could have done with a little less narrative incident and a little more cinematic sparkle.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    There’s only so many times an audience will fall for the same manipulative editing tricks. Still, with fine performances and a rich sense of place, this is a promising start.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    Asking far more questions than it could ever answer, Exposed ends on a note so flat and predictable that it undermines all that went before. But there are strange and memorable moments here, and a mood of eerie foreboding that’s hard to shake.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    The film does approach Milius with a certain reverence, but it can’t disguise the fact that he’s a troubling, divisive figure: bull-headed, almost cartoonishly macho, staunchly right-wing and dangerously self-obsessed.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    If you enjoy improbable plot twists, overcooked dialogue and Hollywood legends champing on scenery, this adaptation is a highly entertaining slice of American Gothic.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    The photography is starkly lovely, the slow drip of information is smartly handled and the central performances are appealingly ambiguous.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    Dante plays the early scenes perfectly, racking up the clammy dread without tipping over into outright nastiness. But somewhere along the way, the tension dissipates.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    This ridiculous, highly watchable, at points startlingly psychedelic action thriller is probably Luc Besson’s best film since ‘Léon’ (which isn’t saying a great deal).
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    Greater conflict (or simply more probing interviews) might have made for a more gripping movie. But what’s here will delight anyone who dreams of living free, sleeping rough and scoffing beans around the campfire.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    This is an unambitious, old-school thriller, nothing more and nothing less.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    It’s undeniably entertaining – and worth seeing for Kingsley alone – with the misfires never fully overshadowing the moments of glory.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    This is a messy, poorly structured film, riddled with plot holes and lacking any kind of satisfying conclusion.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    It’s always fun to watch scaly, skyscraper-size behemoths lay waste to civilization, but a bit more human drama wouldn’t have gone amiss.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    Give Northern Soul its due: this feisty, frequently amusing chronicle of one young man’s journey through the dancehalls of Lancashire nails its time and place.... A pity, then, that the story is so tiresomely familiar.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    The film has plenty to recommend it, thanks to a string of memorable one-liners and Coogan’s unmatched knack for skin-crawling physical comedy. But this is a long way from the back-of-the-net strike it should have been.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    The chassis may be slick and speedy, but under the hood Focus lives up to its Ford-produced namesake: sturdy but not exactly stimulating.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    The sheer sense of ludicrous, punch-the-air joie de vivre is impossibly infectious.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    All three actors work hard... and when the melodrama hits fever pitch, Crimson Peak lurches into life. But overall this lacks weight and intensity: a Brontë-esque bauble smeared in twenty-first-century slickness.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    Taken 3 scores over its predecessor on almost every level: the stakes are higher, the LA locations are nicely photographed and, best of all, there’s an actual plot, with twists and everything.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    Overall, there’s just not enough going on in Disorder: largely plotless and set almost entirely in a single, bland location, it doesn’t have enough atmosphere to compensate for the lack of action.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    Ascher’s aim isn’t simply to inform. The Nightmare wants to be the first properly scary documentary, employing time-honoured horror movie techniques in a concerted effort to spook the viewer. But it’s here that Ascher slightly oversteps himself.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    A little too rough around the edges to fully engage.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    An overlong, at times almost plot-free soap opera that introduces a wealth of characters and dips into a wide variety of subplots but never comes together as a story.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    The first half of Magic Magic is greatly enjoyable... Sadly, director Sebastián Silva isn’t sure where to take his characters.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    Good Kill is a dour, claustrophobic film, offering an acute and stunningly photographed exploration of middle-American banality and moral ambivalence.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    There’s wit, integrity and insight here, but it cries out for a lighter touch.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    The dramatic scenes are a touch overcooked, and there are moments when it feels like a particularly high-end school play, with everyone shouting “Avast!” and “Ahoy!” like they really mean it. The action, though, is consistently impressive: When man and beast go toe-to-tail, your timbers will be truly well shivered.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    Never less than slick, precision-tooled multiplex entertainment, Kingsman hews close to the formula Vaughn and his co-writer Jane Goldman established in their superficially similar "Kick-Ass": hyperspeed action, pithy one-liners and grotesque ultraviolence.

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