For 303 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Tom Russo's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 88 Creed
Lowest review score: 25 Big Mommas: Like Father, Like Son
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 50 out of 303
303 movie reviews
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    It’s all a fair attempt, but Aselton isn’t going to make anyone forget Kathryn Bigelow.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    A sequel that has some snappy interplay, typically courtesy of Malkovich, but mostly feels like a cast working to manufacture what came naturally the first time.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    Instead of all-seeing, it’s more like seen it all before.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    It’s another brightly rendered effort, but, as the title indicates, a lot of the real creativity seems to have been used up the first time around.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    The guys in Metallica are here to remind us that there’s a band behind the rage rock. The IMAX 3-D release Metallica Through the Never is all about reasserting their relevance, loudly.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    Rodriguez does a fair job of keeping the zaniness coming: Vergara’s machine gun bra, Gibson delivering exposition in a “Star Wars” prop, bad guys offed by helicopter blades in dementedly creative ways. It’s enough that you’ll hope Rodriguez makes good on that new faux trailer — for “Machete Kills Again . . . in Space.”
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    In one amusing bit of dialogue, Stallone and Schwarze-negger kid each other about being smarter than they look. For a little while at least, we thought we might be able to say the same about Escape Plan.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    It’s clear To is striving to keep the action gripping and creative. Modestly inspired is more like it.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    First-time director Nick Ryan isn’t entirely up to the challenge in The Summit, but he does deliver some dramatic and visual highs in the attempt.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    Stallone and De Niro simply don’t generate enough combative spark to make this anything more than an amiably mediocre diversion.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    It’s a brutal bit of screen poetry that’s matched too infrequently by the aching human stories director Fedor Bondarchuk is so anxious to tell.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    It’s fun in stretches, but also busily forced.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    The thematic stuff, while well-intentioned, is also clunky, and ultimately beside the point. Action, obviously, is what you’re after.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    Best, probably, to appreciate the movie for what Slattery, Hoffman, and the cast do most effectively: craft a pervasive atmosphere of tired people trudging through tired circumstances that only seem to grow more, well, tiring.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    Funny thing, though: The sunnier that Barrymore gets in her scenes with Sandler, the more the iffy elements and leaden bits seem to just melt away.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    It makes for a structurally glitchy inspirational exercise whose climax carries all the goosebump-making drama of a Pats preseason game.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    The problem with this adaptation of Lawrence Block’s detective yarn isn’t that it casts Neeson in a role we’re seeing him play again and again. It’s that no one else in the movie makes a character feel nearly as broken-in and fully inhabited as he does.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    The dialogue also reflects the material’s stage origins in ways that don’t always translate well.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    Unfortunately, as the story builds toward tenderness, it’s undercut with slathering tongues and bare-chested stud-muffin shots.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    It’s a movie content to stay within the show’s comfort zone, changing things up mainly with flashier, 3-D visuals, a couple of which are dazzlers, and a theme that doesn’t connect in any notable way.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    The story loses its convincingly scaled sense of jeopardy in the late going, and it ultimately unravels.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    An Australian crime yarn with a solid cast and tone, but not enough freshness — or enough of Pegg’s waggishness — to be memorable.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    Max
    These promising themes aren’t given much more than surface treatment, making for a movie as conveniently tidy as some coming-home schmaltz on basic cable.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    But, oh, the action. Tommila and Jackson have a couple of escape sequences that are exhilaratingly choreographed, never mind that one employs a meat freezer as its key prop. Kids should dig these bits. After all, off-kilter as Helander’s sensibility continues to be, he’s got a passion for popcorn-movie energy that can be contagious — especially when he’s not trashing Santa.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    You’ll have to appreciate what fleeting cleverness you can here.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    The film is slow going with its mix of stilted political discourse and restless village folk just looking to celebrate life and dance. At times, it’s like “Footloose” gone didactic.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    Director and Team Besson member Camille Delamarre (“Brick Mansions”) speeds us from one action sequence to the next with a style that alternates between routine, clunky, and modestly inspired.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    The movie may feel tonally consistent with the first, but it’s also overlong and thoroughly routine.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    Wilson has some fun lampooning ’80s action tropes, but he’s also just doing Dwight Schrute with a twang at times. McBrayer and Garcia barely get to play one-note characters, let alone ones that you’ll remember.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    For the haters out there, you could see where Sandler reprising his role as a cartoon Dracula in Hotel Transylvania 2 might just be the perfect metaphor: Yep, there he goes again, evilly sucking the lifeblood out of decent entertainment. Now come on, let’s grab the torches!

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