Metascore
83

Generally favorable reviews - based on 6 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 6 out of 6
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 6
  3. Negative: 0 out of 6
  1. Sep 11, 2013
    91
    As it stands, this very likely is the best PC fighting game available, period – and doubly so for the money. And not only that, but buying the game gives you access to the Skullgirls Beta, so you can test out changes in advance of their going live in the game proper.
  2. Sep 13, 2013
    90
    An atypical fighting game, but one of the best that you can play to introduce yourself to the genre.
User Score
7.6

Generally favorable reviews- based on 96 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 18 out of 25
  2. Negative: 4 out of 25
  1. Aug 27, 2013
    4
    Skullgirls is a fighting game envisioned by fighting game community celebrity: Mike-Z. Because of Mike's pedigree, there is a stark similarity between this game and the Marvel vs. Capcom franchise (in terms of how the game is played). Players can choose from a current roster of 9 characters, and can form a team of 2 or 3 characters, or simply go solo (damage/health adjusts accordingly, depending on your team number). Allow me to say some good things about Skullgirls..

    The animations are pretty to look at. They are very fluid and when looked at in slow-motion you can appreciate how smart certain moves look. The style? The crazy 1920's art-deco noir? It's fantastic and peaks the interest of the player. Most of the music is great, not memorable, but pleasant to listen to. And of course, the characters themselves exude both good character design and zany sex appeal. It's a very sweet looking game with a great concept. However..

    The fighting game itself is both disconcerting and unpalatable for competitive play. When you boot the game up, you're treated to a simple (but effective) tutorial mode, teaching new players about the basic of basics: high, medium, low attacks, blocking, movement, hit-stuns and recovery time, block-strings and tech-ing out of throws. It also teaches the formula/play-style of all 9 of the characters. It succeeds in giving the player a warm welcome both to the game, and the fighting game genre. But that's about it.

    As mentioned above, the game plays similar to marvel vs. capcom, a game which is known for it's long combos and fast-paced footsies. In skullgirls, you get just that. Unfortunately, because of it's relative ease, the hit-stun gauge (pocket of time you have to follow-up your combo) is too large, while in other games, the gauge is a lot tighter, forcing the player to get the timing just right to execute high-damaging and drawn out combos. What this means, is that though the game's mechanics is well-presented to the newcomer and the execution is easy on the fingers, the entire learning curve becomes drastically low.

    More often than not, your opponents will hit-confirm you with one of the 6 pokes, and carry it into a 20-30 second combo that will deplete anywhere between 60 70% of your life-bar. And if you're like-minded and rehearsed your combo, you can counter in turn with one of your own. Essentially, the meta-game boils down to: ''Whoever gets first hit, wins.'' This is doubly true for relatively new players who haven't rehearsed such a combo.

    This is where the game is crippled. The competitive nature of the fighting game genre revolves around trying to read your opponent, and to play mind-games. However, in skullgirls, they have neglected this element. Which is by far, the most important element. Though the game does a fantastic job at first-impressions and presentation; teaching newcomers and brushing veterans to the genre on the basics, the premise of competitive spirit is subsequently destroyed by the rather abhorrent combo mechanic.

    In closing, skullgirls is a pretty game with a fun concept. However, it is let down by the game's inability to balance fast-paced combat with controlled, precise mechanics, but instead, makes the mechanic loose for the newcomer, which subsequently scares such players off when it's exploited to it's full extent. For this reason, I rate it a 4/10. Below average. If you're new to the fighting genre, and wish to pick up a fighting game? Avoid this one.
    Full Review »
  2. Oct 5, 2013
    0
    I found this game to be rather derivative of a large number of other fighting games, and it also seems to have a rather tacky deco art style, which further detracts from the experience. Plus, the are charging £11.99, which I feel is quite an exorbitant price for this game, it seems as though it would be worth around £4.99. Plus, they are charging £3.99 for a DlC which ONLY CHANGES A FEW COLOURS, which seems to be very overpriced... Full Review »
  3. Sep 6, 2013
    0
    derivative as hell fighter. Does absolutely nothing new and everything worse than other games. Its much touted "originality" stops at the character design. I suppose if you couldn't care less about any of that and just want to masturbate to some faux-anime, then go for it I guess. There's even a tutorial in there that's been hailed as amazing by people too lazy to use google.

    In short, absolutely nothing special. If you want to play a good fighter, play pretty much anything else. If you want to play a good fighter that's also pretty, play KoF XIII. If you want to play a barely competent attempt at the genre with janky animation, play Skullgirls. Though I guess Netherrealm's spawn falls into that category too.
    Full Review »