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Generally favorable reviews - based on 49 Critics What's this?

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8.9

Generally favorable reviews- based on 80 Ratings

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  • Summary: Warring clans struggle for supremacy over the Valerian Isles in this tactical role-playing game.
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 49 out of 49
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 49
  3. Negative: 0 out of 49
  1. Feb 9, 2011
    100
    Without question, the finest classic remake I've ever played. It helps that the source material is so strong, of course, but what really makes this PSP rendition stand out is the way its creators have addressed every single sticking point that frustrated me all those years ago.
  2. Mar 22, 2011
    92
    What you are getting with Tactics Ogre is a beautifully told story, a game that plays quite well and, truth be told, is accessible to everyone thanks to the Chariot Tarot system.
  3. Feb 15, 2011
    90
    Tactics Ogre: Let Us Cling Together may be a remake, but it's one of the best remakes out there
  4. 90
    Tactics Ogre: Let Us Cling Together is a phenomenal strategy RPG, and feels like a breath of fresh air for a genre that's felt a little stale lately.
  5. Feb 11, 2011
    88
    Tactics Ogre almost initiated its genre, and it still retains that magic of the golden era of JRPGs, when every new game became an instant classic.
  6. Mar 17, 2011
    81
    Tactics Ogre Let Us Cling Together meaningfully expands on the original game's deep interactive story and dynamic battle system, showing as much respect to prospective players as it does to its source material.
  7. Feb 10, 2011
    80
    Lengthy battles embedded in a great story will bring joy to players. But be warned, to enjoy this one to the fullest, you should possess love for micro management, tactical fighting as well as lots of patience.

See all 49 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 9 out of 11
  2. Negative: 1 out of 11
  1. Mar 25, 2011
    10
    If you have been waiting since Final Fantasy Tactics for the next-thing and have been disappointed by everything released since then (including Disgaea and Agarest), your wait is over.

    Tactics Ogre for PSP literally picks up where FFT left off and is without a doubt the spiritual successor.

    Again, if all the tactical/strategy RPGs out lately have been total let downs for you, this is the game you've been waiting for. This game also has the added bonus of not being polluted with schoolyard scenes and juvenile themes to appeal to a younger crowd. This is a game you can play without feeling like a total molester.
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  2. Feb 18, 2011
    10
    Let me start off by saying the original Tactics Ogre is on my top 5 favorite games of all time -- And the remake is even better. If you are a fan of Strategy RPGS, BUY THIS GAME. The story is by far my favorite of any SRPG. When I first heard about a remake, I figured it was going to be like all the other remakes and have very little new content. This game feels almost completely different, with tons of changes, additions, and notably the removal of the training mode. This review will focus mostly on the changes.

    One of the most noticeable changes is the fact that you level jobs instead of individual characters. So what I always did was have 1 character per job so that you can keep all your jobs leveled. Because of this change and the fact that there is no training mode, I found the first couple battles (after your training buddies leave you) very difficult. Also, experience is gained throughout the battle and at the end it's divided up through all your characters. This is great, because when you begin leveling a new job they can basically stand in the back at level 1 and not risk getting killed.

    Another change during battle is the fact that you can retrace your "steps" or character moves. If you've played the original you understand the fact that sometimes these battles can last an hour, and one wrong move can cost you the battle and lose a vital character. So in order to aleviate a lot of the frustration you are now actually able to backtrack to any move you want (up to 50 moves) by pressing and holding the "L" button. A lot of people will consider this cheating, but this is just an option, and if you're a die hard fan -- just ignore it.

    Another important change is the fact that you can customize each individual character by buying spells and abilities. This feature resembles Final Fantasy Tactics and the use of Job Points. The difference is that you are only able to hold a specified number of skills and abilities. Because of that, each character is unique -- sorta. This feature was probably the first feature I did not like. It grew on me as the game progressed, but originally I felt like I was basically buying the same skills for my melee and the same skills for my mages. The act of trying to make unique characters ended up just being repetative for the first few chapters. The fact remains that these skills are crucial. Without knowing what you're doing, the first few battles were difficult to me until I mastered the purchasing of these skills.


    Probably the most important change to me is the fact that you can replay the game by going back to specific points where you have to make game changing choices and pick a difference choice to see the other outcome. Now die hard fans like me, already did this on the original but this was done by restarting a new game and losing all your hard work. In this remake you can take your party of characters and go back to those important moments. This basically allows you to recruit all those members you were unable to get to form the perfect party. One other sidenote is the music. The music and sound effects are AMAZING. I remember when I was a little kid, whenever I heard music from FFVII or Xenogears it would have a great effect on me. I would get so excited to play it, and even to this day there's a sense of nostalgia. This game has THAT type of music.

    Although this game isn't for anyone, if strategy rpgs like Final Fantasy Tactics, Disgaea, Advanced Wars, Jeanne d'Arc, etc. are appealing to you, then you have to try this game. And if you loved the original, but you're still debating about buying the PSP remake, just remember -- It feels like a new game, plus there's characters you always wanted to recruit in the original, that you can get in the remake. I won't give it away in this review, but a simple Google and you should be able to find it.
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  3. Mar 28, 2011
    10
    I may not of played the original, so I don't know how much of the game's mechanics are new to the PSP release, but if SRPGs were this good back then, why hasn't anyone learned and improved? In a lot of ways it seems like it tries to improve and upgrade modern SRPGs. Units grow and become more powerful as they become skilled, offering the player plenty of customization options. However fresh recruits are far from useless. The story is open-ended, well written, and the characters are believable. The art style also really fits the theme. Forgive me if I fail to articulate what aspects of the game really make it for me, but it's been a long time since I felt like I played a game this substantial. Expand
  4. SBM
    May 19, 2014
    10
    I realize this review is a bit late, but this game really resonated with me as being a high quality classic, and I'd recommend it to anyone looking for not just a good strategy game, but one of the best games ever. Tactics Ogre: LUCT is a remake of Tactics Ogre for the SNES, with more content and a much improved translation (seriously, the dialogue would not be out of place in a fantasy novel.)

    I can really like a game that has excellent gameplay, or a fantastic story. Few games, in my opinion, pull of both at once. I believe Tactics Ogre does, I'll break it down below.

    Gameplay: If you've played Final Fantasy Tactics you're in for (roughly) the same gameplay experience, but with some noticeable differences. It should be noted FF Tactics was the spiritual successor to Tactics Ogre. I think it's a damn shame the Tactics Ogre series has been laid to rest, but I digress. The game both on and off the battlefield requires lots of micromanagement, and in the later game you might spend more time than you'd like grinding levels or crafting powerful weapons. These facets might seem unappealing and to many they likely are, but you get out of the game what you put in. You could speed through the story with minimal grinding and still enjoy it, but the side quests and optional characters are just as engaging and worth your time. I will warn you some of the sidequests can be very long, at least one of the optional dungeons has over 100 levels contained within. I found the game challenging but fair, the hardest levels in the game are the ones where you must keep a friendly NPC alive, as they prone to suicidal charges into the enemy's frontlines.

    The story: I could gush about how much I loved the story but I'll try to keep the fanboyism down. The story is mature, dark and surprisingly real. I won't include a synopsis as you could find one elsewhere and I don't want to risk any spoilers. Just be prepared, friends may die, they may betray you, they may leave you because they disagree with your decisions. The men you fight may be more honorable than the ones you serve, and as the main character comes to realize, "To lead is to stand alone." Additionally, the characters are excellent and have three dimensional personalities. The decisions you make have REAL consequences, and they will dictate who lives and dies. There are also multiple endings, and I will admit my ending on my first play through was not ideal, but it was pretty cool to see such a dark ending in a JRPG.

    Will all the content, the excellent story and just general grade A quality, this is an easy game to recommend. I have inducted Tactics Ogre into my top 5 games of all time, and while Final Fantasy Tactics is very good I would venture to say TO is superior. I bought it off of PSN and play it on my Vita, do yourself a favor and check it out!
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  5. Jan 5, 2012
    10
    Final Fantasy Tactics - but so much more. Tactics Ogre: Let Us Cling Together is a incredible good Strategy RPG. The game works similar to Final Fantasy Tactics(What to expect from pretty much the same developers). Tactics Ogre, just like FFT is about medieval politics, warfare, the split between races and different classes in society(Nobles and the rest).

    What makes Tactics Ogre more fun, and also increases the replayability is the fact that there is several routes and several different endings. Not to mention that you usually can have up to 12 units on the battlefield(Comparing with Final Fantasy Tactics 6 unit cap) You get plenty of choices in-game, but most of them are just whether x guy will join you or not. i.e not that important choices.

    The exp system also works well. The exp is well divided between the characters and the class level is shared between all the characters. So basically if you recruit a new warrior, so will his warrior class level be the same as every other warrior you have. This however is a bit annoying when you unlock a new class and see that it's level 1. Though they level up fast so it isn't really a major issue.
    There are however a few things I dislike, or rather prefer how it is in other games.

    First off - the class / job unlocking system. You unlock new classes by either buying or looting class cards. You can alternatively recruit someone with that class on the battlefield.
    But basically - I prefered the FFT system were you leveled up your classes and unlocked new ones. Instead of getting new classes the further you reach the game.

    Second - The crafting system is incredible slow. It is nothing game breaking, nor do you need to use the crafting system. But it just felt like a waste of time to buy alot of ores and then sit there and watch the crafting animation for the next thirty minutes.(But it was so worth it having upgraded weapons for your ninja) Graphics - Good, the sprites, art, effects,etc are all well made and fits in very well.

    Gameplay - excellent. The combat is fun and very smooth.

    Sounds/Music - Also very excellent. Story - Glorious.
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  6. Nov 11, 2011
    9
    story is amazing, probably the best medieval fantasy I've seen in a videogame with subtle, well done political intrigue and a great cast of characters

    warren report encyclopedia is dynamic and grows as the story moves along, I can lose myself for hours going through and reading the intricacies of the story

    main problems is some facets of the battle
    -AI is sometimes stupid, casts the same ineffective spells over and over
    -large armies and large levels means you will spend a few turns just moving your units across the map, can be time consuming
    -level up system is a hassle when you find a character with a unique job, as you must level them up from zero by having them tag along in fights where they cannot be of much use
    Expand
  7. Aug 12, 2011
    1
    Guest characters (AI characters) are suicidal - simply the worst AI (or scripting) in recent years. This became a deal breaker for me when on one level I was giving the choice to save a AI-controlled character in an impossible situation. After several hours of trying and searching internet for tips, I found out the only way is to cheat the system or let her die by making an out of character choice. The illusion that I was in control of "battle tactic" is but all broken at this point and the rest of the game matters little. Don't call it a tactic/strategy game if the only way to play is by developer's design. Expand

See all 11 User Reviews

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